Navigation Links
Costly blood clots more common than expected among cancer patients
Date:9/20/2011

DURHAM, N.C. An analysis of more than 30,000 cancer patients has shown that blood clots are a more common complication than doctors may realize, causing additional hospitalizations and driving up the cost of care, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher.

The study, which will be reported Sept. 26 at the 2011 European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress in Stockholm, found that as many as one in five patients risk developing a blood clot called venous thromboembolism, or VTE, within a year of getting treatment for some types of cancers.

In up to 2 percent of cases the complication is deadly. Clots that form in veins deep in the legs or pelvis can travel to the arteries of the lungs and block blood flow. VTEs are also costly. Cancer patients who develop the clots require medication and hospitalizations that contribute to an average care bill of $110,362, compared to $77,984 for those who do not have VTEs, the study authors reported.

"Direct medical costs of healthcare are significantly greater among cancer patients experiencing a VTE and still do not include caregiver expenses, out of pocket costs and the intangible costs of pain and suffering," said lead author Gary H. Lyman, M.D., M.P.H., a professor of medicine and director of the Comparative Effectiveness and Outcomes Research Program at Duke.

In conducting the study, Lyman and colleagues analyzed 30,552 cancer cases from the InVision Data Mart Multiplan/ Integrated Health Care Information Solutions, a large cache of data on more than 17 million U.S. medical patients. The records were of ordinary cancer patients, not participants in clinical trials who tend to be enrolled because they have fewer health issues and therefore develop fewer complications.

The researchers focused on diagnoses of lung, pancreatic, stomach, colon/rectum, bladder and ovarian cancers among patients who began chemotherapy during a four-year period ending in 2008.

Among those in the study group, the risk of developing a VTE within 3.5 months of starting treatment varied widely depending on the type of cancer diagnosed. Bladder cancer carried the lowest risk, at 4.8 percent, and pancreatic cancer had the highest risk, at 11.9 percent. (Colon/rectum 6.1 percent; ovary 6.2 percent; lung 8.5 percent; stomach 8.5 percent)

After a year of treatment, risks nearly doubled across many of the six cancer types, with 9.9 percent of bladder cancer patients and 21.5 percent of pancreatic cancer patients developing clots. (Colon/rectum 11.9 percent; ovary 11.4 percent; lung 14.8 percent; stomach 16.7 percent)

Lyman said scientist don't fully understand why VTEs form during cancer treatment, but have identified certain contributing factors, including blood clotting agents released by tumors, side effects of chemotherapy, and pre-existing health conditions such as obesity and anemia.

He said knowing which patients are at highest risk of developing blood clots could lead to better preventive use of blood thinners. But the preventive use of blood thinners comes with its own risk of potentially dangerous bleeding. A risk score for identifying high risk patients for VTE is based on the type of cancer they have and the other known contributing factors.

"We need more data from randomized control trials in the higher risk populations that would demonstrate a favorable benefit-to-harm ratio from such preventive measures," Lyman said. "Further studies are also needed on the complications of cancer treatment and the associated costs in real-life cancer patients to guide future clinical decisions and more personalized supportive care in patients starting cancer chemotherapy."


'/>"/>

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study Suggests Low-Consuming Medicare Beneficiaries With Chronic Disease Are More Costly to Program
2. Why do physicians order costly CTs? Ultrasound yields better diagnosis, safer, less costly
3. Costly tests may not help detect bladder cancer recurrence, M. D. Anderson study finds
4. Does the U.S. Need to Ration Costly End-of-Life Care?
5. Mental health leaves most costly disability to Canadian employers
6. Patients Who Swallow Foreign Objects a Costly Burden to Health Care
7. For HIV-positive patients, delayed treatment a costly decision
8. Evidence lacking for widespread use of costly antipsychotic drugs, says Stanford researcher
9. Knee replacement surgeries take more time, are more costly in overweight individuals
10. Adverse drug events costly to health care system: Vancouver Coastal Health-UBC research
11. Portable, less costly peritoneal dialysis shows no additional catheter risk factors
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 26, 2016 , ... Cabot Corporation, Pfizer, and 3M are ... court documents and SEC filings. A jury has returned a verdict of ... Corporation, Case No. BC588866, Los Angeles County, California. The jury awarded $22.8 million ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... ... On Memorial Day, Hope For Heroes and USA Medical Card ... the country. The nonprofit Hope For Heroes partnered with the leading provider of ... disabled military veterans, as well as police, firemen, and EMS professionals across the country, ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... MadgeTech will be showcasing its ... manufactured in Warner, New Hampshire at the MadgeTech headquarters. With products sold in more ... trusted by government agencies, including NASA. , In 2012, NASA strategically set up ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... ... an effort to provide hair restoration information to the widest possible audience, Dr. Parsa Mohebi ... use the app. Dr. Mohebi, the founder of Parsa Mohebi Hair Restoration, is making all ... Dr. Mohebi says, “The positive response to the Snapchat videos we started last month has ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... The Lung Institute ... six-week smoking cessation class starting June 6 at their clinic in downtown Tampa. The ... , Additionally, the Lung Institute has created a free downloadable 4 Week Smoking ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/26/2016)... Since its commercial introduction in ... life science tool for conducting genetic studies in a ... in its new report that the industry sits on ... by a range of new applications in the clinical ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140723/694805 ) , Since the Human ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... and GERMANTOWN, Maryland , May 25, 2016 ... ; Frankfurt Prime Standard: QIA) today announced that the company ... Diagnostics GmbH to develop and commercialize predictive assays in oncology. ... as a marker to predict effectiveness of anthracycline treatment in ... "We are pleased to partner with Therawis, which developed the ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... Florida , May 25, 2016 ... Conference & Expo earlier this month, the numbers and ... revenues continue to climb into the billions, more research ... newly released 4th Edition State of Legal Marijuana Markets ... a cannabis-focused data-analysis firm, much of the increase in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: