Navigation Links
Cost concerns prevent many cancer survivors from getting medical care

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Monday, June 14, 2010 A new study led by a Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center researcher shows that millions of cancer survivors are forgoing needed medical care because of concerns about cost.

Published early online today in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study raises the concern that the long-term health and well-being of cancer survivors could suffer because patients have financial worries about their care.

A team led by Kathryn E. Weaver, Ph.D., M.P.H., an assistant professor in the Division of Public Health Sciences and lead author on the study, examined the prevalence of forgoing different types of health care due to financial concerns. Researchers sought to determine whether cancer history and race or ethnicity were associated with individuals' likelihood to go without care.

The investigators analyzed information from the annual U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an in-person, nationwide survey of 30,000 to 40,000 households in the civilian, non-institutionalized population that is used to track trends in illness and disability in the United States. Data from 6,602 adult cancer survivors and 104,364 individuals with no history of cancer, who were surveyed in the 2003 to 2006 NHIS, were included in the study.

The analysis showed that among cancer survivors, the prevalence of forgoing care in the past year due to concerns about cost was 7.8 percent for medical care, 9.9 percent for prescription medications, 11.3 percent for dental care, and 2.7 percent for mental health care. Cancer survivors under the age of 65 years were one and a half to two times more likely to delay or forgo all types of medical care than their same-age peers without a history of cancer. Hispanic and black cancer survivors were more likely to go without prescription medications and dental care than white survivors.

"Although the large number of survivors going without care was somewhat surprising, it has long been recognized that cancer can have a negative impact on the financial health of survivors," Weaver said. "This is important because cancer survivors have many medical needs that persist for years after their diagnosis and treatment. The implications of this financial stress for their ongoing medical care are just beginning to be recognized."

The analysis revealed that 18 percent of U.S. cancer survivors, which represents more than two million individuals, did not get one or more needed medical services because of financial concerns.

"Future research needs to examine the impact of forgoing care on survivors' quality of life and survival," the authors wrote. Weaver added that it was not clear from this study what specific types of medical care were not being received and whether the services were cancer-related. She also noted that it will be interesting to observe how recent health care reform efforts might impact access to care for cancer survivors in the coming years.


Contact: Jessica Guenzel
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center

Related medicine news :

1. Poll finds concerns about pace of medical and health research
2. Concerns over radiation exposure may overshadow life-saving benefits of cardiac imaging tests
3. NOW Foods Response to Fish Oil and PCB Concerns
4. Registered Nurses from Public Health - Seattle & King County Hold Informational Picket to Highlight Public Safety Concerns
5. Home palliative sedation checklist may ease concerns
6. Fire Protection Online Resolves Safety Concerns with CO2 Fire Extinguishers
7. Alternative chemicals ease safety concerns about nonstick, repellent coatings
8. Steritech Retains Leavitt Partners to Advise the Company on Emerging Food Safety Concerns and Regulation
9. Diabetes patients rank health concerns differently than their doctors, U-M survey shows
10. Actuaries Detail Health Care Reform Concerns to Congressional Leaders
11. CHIME Voices Concerns About Proposed ARRA Regulations
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Wimbledon Health Partners, ... new Wimbledon Athletics Facebook page to educate the public, parents and ... abnormalities. About 2,000 people under the age of 25 die from sudden cardiac ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... ... Smiles by Stevens is pleased to announce the addition of Botox® for the ... of the benefits of Botox® in the treatment of moderate facial wrinkling, few have ... pain as a result of Jaw Tension, TMJ (temporo-mandibular joint) disorder, and Bruxism (the ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Brillianteen, McGaw YMCA’s student-produced musical show, will ... Anniversary Brillianteen Revue, scheduled for March 4-6, 2016. Auditions for this final production ... been a treasured tradition for numerous families in the Evanston community. Over the ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... D.C. (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... Today, ... fatalities on our nation’s roadways has dropped below 10,000 for the first time since ... 10,076 in 2013. , According to data released by the National Highway Traffic Safety ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... "When I ... regular bras were incredibly uncomfortable," said an inventor from Bronx, N.Y. "In order ... developed the patent-pending RECOVERY BRA for added comfort and support. The bra is ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... 2015 --> ... combineert immunotherapie met Bremachlorin-photodynamische therapie voor de ... ) --> ... ) Uit een ... (LUMC) blijkt dat ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 ... addition of the "2016 Future Horizons ... of Abuse Testing Market: Supplier Shares, Country ... report to their offering. --> ... the "2016 Future Horizons and Growth ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... November 26, 2015 ... addition of the  "2016 Future Horizons ... Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) Market: Supplier ... Emerging Opportunities"  report to their offering.  ... announced the addition of the  "2016 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: