Navigation Links
Coronary calcium distribution tied to heart attack risk

OAK BROOK, Ill. A new calcium scoring method may better predict a persons risk of heart attack, according to a new multicenter study published in the June issue of the journal Radiology. Calcium coverage scoring takes into account not only the amount of calcified plaque build-up in the coronary arteries, but also its distribution.

Now we know that the location of the calcium in the arteries is particularly important in estimating a patients potential risk, said the studys lead author Elizabeth Brown, Sc.D., research assistant professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. Each year, 700,000 Americans die of heart disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The most common form of heart disease in the U.S. is coronary artery disease, which is caused by a build-up of calcific plaque in the coronary arteries leading to the heart. The current standard of coronary calcium measurement gauges only the amount of calcium present in the arteries, not its spatial distribution.

Currently, physicians only see the result in terms of an overall score designed to measure the amount of calcified plaque, Dr. Brown said. This new approach will provide physicians with a measure of the proportion of the arteries affected.

The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) began in July 2000. The prospective study included 6,814 men and women between the ages of 45 and 84. The researchers compared CT image data for 3,252 participants with calcific plaque to data collected from 3,416 patients without calcific plaque. (Due to lack of sufficient CT image data, 146 additional MESA participants were excluded from this analysis.) A calcium coverage score was developed to estimate the percentage of coronary arteries affected by plaque.

The patients were then followed up for a median period of 41 months to determine if there was a relationship between the distribution of calcium shown in the CT images and the likelihood heart attack or other cardiac event.

The results showed that diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia (abnormal concentrations of lipids [fats] or lipoproteins in the blood) were highly associated with calcium coverage score. The study also found that the calcium coverage scorewhich takes into account the location of the calciumwas a better predictor of future cardiac events than currently used measures that gauge only the amount of calcium present. On average, compared to patients without diabetes, patients with diabetes had 44 percent more of their coronary arteries affected by plaque. A twofold increase in calcium coverage score indicated a 34 percent increase in risk of heart attack or other serious cardiac event and a 52 percent increase in the risk of any cardiac event.

Calcium coverage scoring has the potential to improve our estimate of a patients risk for adverse clinical outcomes, such as heart attacks or death, Dr. Brown said.


Contact: Linda Brooks
Radiological Society of North America

Related medicine news :

1. When statins arent enough: New trial drug points to better management of coronary heart disease
2. MAQUET Cardiovascular Launches HEARTSTRING III Proximal Seal System for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery
3. Extremely low dose CT coronary angiography shows promise in assessing cardiac function
4. Clopidogrel reloading worthwhile in acute coronary syndromes
5. New Drug Shows Promise in Use With Coronary Stents
6. Calcium Scans Help Predict Coronary Risk
7. Acute Coronary Events Drop After Italys Public Smoking Ban
8. Triglycerides Linked to Coronary Disease Risk
9. Acute coronary events decreased after public smoking ban in Italy
10. UMass Medical School study finds patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease continue poor diets
11. Cardicas C-Port Anastomosis Systems for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Procedures to be Used to Train Cardiothoracic Surgeons at Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) University
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/28/2015)... ... , ... Pixel Film Studios is back again with ProPanel: Pulse . ... endless. Users have full control over angle of view, speed method, start point, end ... to get heads to turn. , ProPanel: Pulse offers fully customizable pulsating shape masks, ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... the health care in America. As people age, more care is needed, especially ... are rising, and medical professionals are being overworked. The forgotten part of this ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... November 27th edition of USA Today in Atlanta, Dallas, New York, Minneapolis, South ... 750,000. The digital component is distributed nationally, through a vast social media strategy ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... A simply ... Jones, is an interesting show that delves into an array of issues that are ... that could benefit from open dialogue, this show is changing the subjects consumers focus ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 27, 2015 , ... Dr. Thomas Dunlap and Dr. Patrick ... Bierbaum with Emergency Medicine at St., Joseph Health System’s Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital ... present in similar ways and require time-critical intervention to avoid large area heart damage ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/29/2015)... 2015 CIVCO Medical Solutions will demonstrate ... Radiological Society of North America ... November 29 – December 4, 2015. The ... customers unrivaled versatility, enhanced user experience and deliver ... --> --> ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... 2015  Lannett Company, Inc. (NYSE: LCI ... acquisition of Kremers Urban Pharmaceuticals Inc. (KU), the ... company UCB S.A. (Euronext: UCB). ... KU from UCB for total consideration of approximately ... customary working capital adjustment, a deduction of certain ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , 26 november 2015 ... kondigt de geplande investering aan van ten ... de laboratoria en het mondiale hoofdkantoor in ... uitbreiding zal resulteren in extra kantoorruimte en ... aan de groeiende behoeften van de farmaceutische ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: