Navigation Links
Cornell receives federal grants to create fabrics to render toxic chemicals harmless
Date:5/27/2008

Cornell fiber scientist Juan Hinestroza is working with the U.S. government to create fabrics made of functional nanofibers that would decompose toxic industrial chemicals into harmless byproducts.

Potential applications include safety gear for U.S. soldiers and filtration systems for buildings and vehicles.

Hinestroza, assistant professor of fiber science in the College of Human Ecology, is a member of two teams that secured more than $2.2 million from the U.S. Department of Defense; about $875,000 will go directly to Hinestoza's work. Both grants are multi-university collaborative efforts funded through the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

"These nanostructures could be used in creating advanced air filtration and personal protection systems against airborne chemical threats and can find many applications in buildings, airplanes as well as personal respirators," Hinestroza said.

The first project, in collaboration with North Carolina State University, is aimed at understanding how very small electrical charges present in fibers and nanofibers can help in capturing nanoparticles, bacteria and viruses.

"Understanding how these charges are injected into the fibers and how they are dissipated under different environmental conditions can open an avenue to significant improvements in air filtration technology," Hinestroza said.

The position and distribution of the electrical charges on the nanofibers will be fed into computerized fluid dynamics algorithms developed by Andrey Kutznetsov of NC State to predict the trajectory of the nanoparticles challenging the filter. Hinestroza and NC State's Warren Jasper pioneered work in this area a couple of years ago.

The second project, in collaboration with the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), will study the incorporation of a new type of molecules -- called metal organic polyhedra and metal organic frameworks -- onto polymeric nanofibers to trap dangerous gases as toxic industrial chemicals and chemical warfare agents, then decompose them into substances that are less harmful to humans and capture them for further decontamination. The synthesis of these molecules was pioneered by Omar Yaghi of UCLA.

This project will also look into the potential toxicity of these nanofiber-nanoparticle systems to humans in collaboration with Andre Nel from UCLA Medical School.


'/>"/>

Contact: Blaine Friedlander
bpf2@cornell.edu
607-254-8093
Cornell University Communications
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. NIH selects Weill Cornell Medical College to lead new NYC translational research collaboration
2. Healthy restaurants help make us fat, says a new Cornell study
3. The latest about male infertility and testosterone from NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
4. White House awards Weill Cornells Bruce McCandliss highest honor for early career scientists
5. Weill Cornell receives $2.4 million in grants from Gates Foundation to fight tuberculosis
6. NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell creates world-class cancer center
7. By color-coding atoms, new Cornell electron microscope promises big advance in materials analysis
8. $50 million gift to NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center
9. Weill Cornell team identifies potential new drug targets against hormone-dependent breast cancer
10. Weill Cornell receives funding to study creation of new elder abuse center
11. Weill Cornell Medical College Announces First Commencement of Its New Medical School Graduates in Doha, Qatar, May 8, 2008
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... MD Now Urgent Care ... MD Now’s 28th facility overall and marks the urgent care center's eighth location in ... North of The Falls shopping mall. The new clinic offers a wide array of ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... ... American Farmer, will feature Chr. Hansen, Inc (CHR Hansen) in an upcoming episode ... Farmer airs Tuesdays at 8:30aET on RFD-TV. Check your local listings for more info. ... 1874 after a groundbreaking discovery of how to industrialize enzymes. Rooted in science and ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... Chicago, IL (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2017 ... ... insurance management assistance and financial planning services to communities in the greater Chicago ... Children’s Association to offer assistance to underprivileged youth in Chicago. , Founded in ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... Moore Insurance, ... area with access to asset protection and financial planning services, is teaming up ... improving the lives of children with cancer and other chronic diseases. , The ...
(Date:6/22/2017)... ... June 22, 2017 , ... ... is pleased to welcome Whipple & Company as its newest Partner Firm. Headquartered ... of balancing their clients’ risk while tailoring optimized benefit packages that strengthen the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/2/2017)... , June 2, 2017  NxStage Medical, Inc. (Nasdaq:  NXTM), a ... today announced new findings demonstrating positive biochemical outcomes related ... System One™. The data will be presented at the ... Madrid, Spain . The ... Home Dialysis Network in Europe ...
(Date:5/29/2017)... Israel, May 29, 2017  Cellect Biotechnology Ltd. (NASDAQ: ... technology which enables the functional selection of stem cells, ... for the first quarter ended March 31 st , ... our accomplishments in the first quarter of 2017," said ... quarter, we announced the treatment of the first blood ...
(Date:5/22/2017)... VALLEY COTTAGE, N.Y. , May 22, 2017 ... natural antiviral treatment Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin, announces the launch of ... in plain English, the results of a clinical ... after one year treatment with Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin in individuals ... is important to note that there are no ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: