Navigation Links
Continued Use of ADHD Drugs May Reduce Criminal Behavior, Study Says
Date:11/21/2012

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For teens and adults who don't grow out of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, staying on ADHD medications may help them stay out of trouble.

Males with ADHD who stayed on medications for the disorder reduced their risk of criminal behavior by 32 percent, while women who did so reduced their rates of criminal behavior by 42 percent, according to a large Swedish study.

"It seems as though ADHD medications decrease the risk for criminality while under treatment," said the study's lead author, Paul Lichtenstein, professor of genetic epidemiology at the Karolinska Institute, in Stockholm.

Results of the study are published in the Nov. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Dr. Andrew Adesman, chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at the Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York, in New Hyde Park, said past research has found that adults with ADHD have a "host of increased risks later in life, like driving accidents, losing jobs, divorce and arrests." Adesman said those at greatest risk of criminal behavior are those with hyperactivity.

Adesman added that it's important for parents to know that not all children with ADHD will engage in criminal behavior, and that some children will outgrow ADHD. Still, "collectively, people with ADHD are at risk for a range of poor outcomes," he said.

For the current study, the researchers gathered information on more than 25,000 people living in Sweden with a diagnosis of ADHD. They also collected information on what types of medications were given as treatment, and any criminal convictions that occurred between 2006 and 2009.

Researchers then compared non-medication periods to medication periods and the rates of criminal behavior for each person.

The risk of criminal activity dropped by more than a third for men and women combined during medication periods, according to the study.

Lichtenstein said the researchers didn't study whether medications were more effective in reducing criminal behavior for a particular age group. They also didn't look at whether one type of medication was better at decreasing the risk of criminal activity, but he said those that influence the core symptoms of ADHD -- such as impulsivity, restlessness and irritability -- are likely to be better at reducing criminal behavior.

Lichtenstein said ADHD medications should be seriously considered for adolescents and young adults with ADHD who are at risk for criminal behavior.

"All medications have potential adverse side effects, and the clinician should weigh risks and benefits for each patient," he added. "Now, they should include the potential decreased risk of criminality in that evaluation."

For his part, Adesman said that based on the findings of this study, it looks as though treatment with ADHD medication can make a difference in the risk of criminal behavior. But, he said, it's important to realize that the population in this study isn't the same as the population in the United States, so the findings might be different if the study were done here.

Adesman said it is also important not to "presume that children diagnosed with ADHD today have the same risks of criminality as people diagnosed 20 years ago, given the greater awareness, education resources and support that is available today."

However, he added, "I suspect that symptomatic people probably do better with medications."

Although the study found an association between staying on ADHD medication and reduced criminal behavior, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

Learn more about the medications used to treat ADHD from the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.

SOURCES: Paul Lichtenstein, Ph.D., professor, genetic epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Andrew Adesman, M.D., chief, developmental and behavioral pediatrics, Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York, New Hyde Park, N.Y.; Nov. 21, 2012, New England Journal of Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Discontinued Meds May Still Get Dispensed
2. UAlberta prostate cancer researcher and team developing homing beacon drugs to target cancer cells
3. Can breast cancer cells reaction to cancer drugs be predicted?
4. Quick, high-volume test offers fast track in search for Alzheimers drugs
5. Structure of enzyme unravelled providing basis for more accurate design of chemotherapeutic drugs
6. Injectable sponge delivers drugs, cells, and structure
7. Game changer for arthritis and anti-fibrosis drugs
8. First trial in humans of minicells: A completely new way of delivering anti-cancer drugs
9. Testing pain killers on humans could save money and speed the arrival of new drugs
10. Patients with aberrations in two genes respond better to drugs blocking a well-known cancer pathway
11. New Diabetes Drugs Have Different Advantages, Study Says
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Continued Use of ADHD Drugs May Reduce Criminal Behavior, Study Says
(Date:2/20/2017)... ... February 20, 2017 , ... Sensogram Technologies ... by for a visit this week at HIMSS 2017 Conference & Exhibition. The ... the globe. Sensogram will be featured in the conference’s Connected Health Experience section, ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... Petersburg, Fla. (PRWEB) , ... February 20, 2017 , ... ... its research and education building. A topping out ceremony on Friday marked the halfway ... The building, set to open in Fall 2018, will serve as a center for ...
(Date:2/19/2017)... South Carolina (PRWEB) , ... February 19, 2017 , ... ... of evening undergraduate nursing students, is being led by Amelia Joseph, Ph.D. Joseph was ... the initial operations of the nursing department in early 2016. After a nation-wide search, ...
(Date:2/19/2017)... ... February 19, 2017 , ... ... healthcare, will join forces with Healthwise ® at HIMSS 2017 ... industry leader in evidence-based health education, technology and services, will demonstrate a voice-powered ...
(Date:2/18/2017)... ... February 17, 2017 , ... CONTACT:, Glenn Vallecillos, MD, ... plastic surgeon Dr. Glenn Vallecillos experiments SculpSure, the hot, new, aesthetic, ... surgery has been centered around that idea that to achieve ones desired results ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/20/2017)... DUBLIN , Feb 20, 2017 ... "Hernia Repair Devices Global Market -Forecast to 2022" report ... ... obesity, the rise in aging population, rising adoption of tension ... are driving the growth of hernia repair devices global market. ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... February 20, 2017 The ... USD 58.4 billion by 2025, according to a ... market is driven by technological advancements in veterinary ... opportunities to the market. For instance, MediLabSecure, a ... of identifying emerging viruses and pathogens in 19 ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... Feb. 20, 2017   Alberty   ... Batavia, NY has announced a significant shift ... and wellness programs to servicing local Veteran Affairs Centers ... budgets and an increased need to secure cost effective ... to source locally for their goods & services. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: