Navigation Links
Compound found that targets wide range of viruses
Date:2/1/2010

GALVESTON, Texas The development of antibiotics gave physicians seemingly miraculous weapons against infectious disease. Effective cures for terrible afflictions like pneumonia, syphilis and tuberculosis were suddenly at hand. Moreover, many of the drugs that made them possible were versatile enough to knock out a wide range of deadly bacterial threats.

Unfortunately, antibiotics have a fundamental limitation: They're useless against viruses, which cause most infectious diseases. Antiviral drugs have proven far more difficult to create, and almost all are specifically directed at a few particular pathogens namely HIV, herpes viruses and influenza viruses. The two "broad-spectrum" antivirals in use, ribavirin and interferon-alpha, both cause debilitating side effects.

Now, researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, UCLA, Harvard University, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and Cornell University have teamed up to develop and test a broad-spectrum antiviral compound capable of stopping a wide range of highly dangerous viruses, including Ebola, HIV, hepatitis C virus, West Nile virus, Rift Valley fever virus and yellow fever virus, among others.

UCLA researchers led by Dr. Benhur Lee corresponding author on a paper on the work appearing this week on the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science Web site identified the compound (which they call LJ001), after screening a "library" of about 30,000 molecules to find a one that blocked the host cell entry of deadly Nipah virus. Subsequent experiments revealed that LJ001 blocked other viruses that, like Nipah, were surrounded by fatty capsules known as lipid envelopes. It had no effect on nonenveloped viruses.

"Once we started testing more and more, we realized that it was only targeting enveloped viruses," said Alexander Freiberg, director of UTMB's Robert E. Shope, M.D. Laboratory, the Biosafety Level 4 lab where much of the cell-culture work was done, as well as mouse studies with Ebola and Rift Valley fever viruses. "We followed up and determined that it was somehow changing the lipid envelope to prevent the fusion of the virus particle with the host cell."

Additional experiments indicated that while LJ001 also interacted with cell membranes, whose composition is nearly identical with that of virus envelopes, it caused them no ill effects. The reason, according to the researchers: Cells can rapidly repair their membranes, but viruses can't fix their envelopes.

"At antiviral concentrations, any damage it does to the cell's membrane can be repaired, while damage done to static viral envelopes, which have no inherent regenerative capacity, is permanent and irreversible," said Lee.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jim Kelly
jpkelly@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Quality of compounded medicines supported by new standards
2. Compounds Identified That Might Treat Nerve Diseases
3. Prenatal exposure to flame-retardant compounds affects neurodevelopment of young children
4. New compound improves cognitive decline, symptoms of Alzheimers disease in rodents
5. Marijuana Compounds Could Beat Back Brain Cancer
6. Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
7. Coffee break: Compound brewing new research in colon, breast cancer
8. Amylin Pharmaceuticals and Takeda Enter into Worldwide Agreement to Co-Develop and Commercialize Compounds for Obesity
9. Texas State University Names Developer of ALKA-V6 Compound to Board of Advisors
10. Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
11. New Compound Shrinks Skin Cancers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... that serve communities in and around the greater Phoenix metropolitan region, is announcing ... Connection. , The mission of the Homeless Youth Connection is to promote community ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Louis, MS (PRWEB) , ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... that serve commercial and residential clients in and around the Hancock County area, is ... for the Hancock County Food Pantry. , The Hancock County Food Pantry has worked ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... to families and business owners in and around central Kansas, is joining the ... at-risk youth in the region. , Headquartered in Wichita, Youth Horizons works to ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... 07, 2016 , ... Students attending Envision’s summer 2017 ... get hands-on experience in an emergency medical simulation, When Care is Hours Away. ... real-life medical skills that are critical success in a future career and beyond. ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... Kenall Manufacturing, a leader in ... MPCNGX . The MPCNGX is a multi-function, sealed, LED luminaire that meets the needs ... where and when it’s needed. , A 2’ x 4’ model features ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... Dec. 8, 2016 CANTEL MEDICAL CORP. (NYSE: ... $18,800,000, or $0.45 per diluted share, on a 22.1% increase ... ended October 31, 2016. This compares with net income of ... for the first quarter ended October 31, 2015. ... ended October 31, 2016 to $21,323,000, or $0.51 per diluted ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... December 8, 2016 Stock-Callers.com revisits ... research, distribution, and marketing of pharmaceutical drug products. Companies ... protection and expiration. Additionally, these firms typically have dividend ... a whole. Up for review this morning are: Novo ... Inc. (NASDAQ: SGYP ), Pernix Therapeutics Holdings ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , Dec. 8, 2016 ... company advancing technologies designed to address rare, emerging ... Chitra Edwin , Ph.D., RAC, as Senior ... Edwin will provide leadership for all U.S. and ... approvals, preparation of regulatory submissions, serving as the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: