Navigation Links
Community health workers help type 2 diabetes care
Date:2/11/2013

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] Newly published results from a randomized controlled clinical trial in the Pacific U.S. territory of American Samoa add clear evidence for the emerging idea that community health workers can meaningfully improve type 2 diabetes care in medically underserved communities.

In the U.S. territory, 21.5 percent of adults have type 2 diabetes. Meanwhile, 58 percent of families are below the U.S. poverty level. The research team, led by public health researchers from Brown and The Miriam Hospital, wanted to test whether four trained local community health workers led by a nurse case-manager could extend the reach of the territory's limited medical staff.

For their study, published online in the journal Diabetes Care, the team recruited 268 Samoans with type 2 diabetes and randomly assigned them, according to their villages, into two groups: One panel received a personal, culturally tailored intervention from community health workers, and one group continued with only their usual primary care.

After a year, members of the group that received the intervention were twice as likely as those in the usual care group to have made a clinically significant improvement in blood glucose levels, the researchers found.

"This approach of using community health workers and home visits can work to help individuals better manage their diabetes," said Stephen McGarvey, professor of epidemiology (research) at Brown University, a co-author and principal investigator of the study. "This adds to the small list of randomized trials designed to look at the efficacy of community health workers to help underserved patients."

Cultural context

For the intervention group, the community health workers trained by the researchers and led by the nurse would visit each patient's home or workplace either weekly, monthly or quarterly depending on the patient's level of health risk from the disease. The workers would test and explain blood glucose readings, remind patients to keep up with medicines and doctors' clinic visits, and lead educational discussions about diet and exercise based on educational materials developed by the research team. If patients were having problems caring for themselves, the workers were trained to help them solve the problems.

Patients could choose from a menu of eight topics for their educational discussions.

The basic model for the intervention came from the successful "Project Sugar 2" trial in Baltimore, but study lead author Judith DePue of The Miriam and Brown said she and her team made many cultural adaptations after conducting extensive ethnographic research, including focus groups with patients.

The educational materials were in both English and Samoan. The foods and activities represented in the text and visuals were familiar and accessible in the territory's culture. All the community health workers were local residents, and the community health worker visits were free of charge (DePue's research found that even small co-pays were deterring some of the territory's residents from seeking primary care).

"We really needed to make it work in this setting," DePue said. "The adaptation that we did, we think, was part of why it was successful."

The study's main measure of that success was a blood glucose level called HbA1c. At the beginning of the study the average level in the intervention group was 9.6 percent and in the traditional care group was 10 percent. After a year, the intervention group members brought levels down to 9.3 percent on average, while among the traditional care group the average level remained at 10 percent.

Meanwhile, more than 42 percent of patients in the intervention group were able to reduce their HbA1c level by more than half a percentage point, a reduction that diabetes researchers consider clinically significant.

The researchers acknowledge that 9.3 percent is still much higher than the goal recommended by the American Diabetes Association of less than 7 percent. Still, the greatest improvements in the study occurred among the highest-risk patients who received the most frequent community health worker interactions. Future work in this resource-poor setting, DePue said, may need more sustained support or a more comprehensive approach.

But McGarvey and DePue said the overall results should encourage health officials to consider community health worker models for diabetes 2 care in areas, from Baltimore to American Samoa, where physician's office care has not proven to be enough.

"We believe the findings here may also be generalizable to other diabetes patients in resource-poor and high-risk populations," they wrote in Diabetes Care. "This study adds to the growing body of evidence showing community health workers ability to improve diabetes outcomes and related behaviors."


'/>"/>

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Marriage Counseling Virginia "Best of the Best" Awarded to Good Neighbor Community Services for Excellence by Follow Media Consulting, Inc.
2. Goldberg & Goldberg Files Wrongful Death Lawsuit on Behalf of a 91 year-old Alzheimer's Patient Who Froze to Death Outside a Retirement Community
3. Kettlebell Exercises Trainer Lorna Kleidman Applauds the Use of Fitness Classes at Community Center
4. Borough of Folcroft Launches Community Recycling to Recycle Clothes and Reduce Waste
5. Saul Schottenstein Foundation B Makes a Grant to Jewish Community Center of Northern Virginia
6. Saul Schottenstein Foundation B Makes a Grant to Jewish Community Center of Manhattan
7. Trauma patients, community say they support exception from informed consent research
8. Maricopa Community Colleges to Host NASA Astronauts
9. Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York Promotes Brand and Wellness with Community Play Area Sponsorship
10. Hardcore Fitness Center Offers Free Classes for Community at Grand Opening Open House
11. Local Chiropractor Hosting Free Community Event and Giving an iPad Mini Away to Raise Funds for Nonprofit Children's Center at her Grand Opening
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Community health workers help type 2 diabetes care
(Date:4/30/2016)... ... April 30, 2016 , ... ... 2016 questioned the use of the HyProCure sinus tarsi implant. ( http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/banned-quebec-dentist-pierre-dupont-working-as-chiropodist-in-ottawa-1.3515494 ... EOTTS-HyProCure is a minimally invasive procedure performed, when indicated, to correct the ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 30, 2016 , ... Mercy College is expanding its Graduate Business ... will be expanding due to high demand: Master of Business Administration (MBA), Master of ... summer. , School of Business Graduate Program Chair Dr. Ray Manganelli said: ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Shamangelic Healing, Sedona Arizona's ... brand Alpha BRAIN and New Mood Daily-Stress Formula for brain optimization and wellness ... to the store is just one more way Shamangelic Healing supports people’s quest ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... advocating optimistic healthcare awareness and author of best seller "LOVE, MEDICINE and MIRACLES") ... Radio Monday, May 2, 2016 and podcasted thereafter . Dr. Bernie Siegel, ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... St. Petersburg, Fla. (PRWEB) , ... April 29, ... ... All Children’s Hospital surgeon reveals that infants born with severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia ... 3,000 babies is born with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)—a condition where the diaphragm ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... -- Hologic, Inc. (Nasdaq: HOLX ) announced ... second quarter ended March 26, 2016.  GAAP diluted ... and non-GAAP diluted EPS of $0.47 increased 14.6%.  ... reported basis, and 6.3% on a constant currency ... quarter, highlighted by 14.6% growth in non-GAAP EPS," ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... , April 27, 2016 ... accelerator (MR-linac) platform will be the focal point of ... of the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology, taking ... MR-linac integrates a state-of-the-art radiotherapy system and a high-field ... to clearly see the patient,s anatomy in real time. ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... 27, 2016  Bayer Animal Health today announced ... the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, ... in Communication Award (BECA). Brittany was selected from ... a total of $70,000 in scholarship funds through ... Bayer has provided a total of $232,500 in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: