Navigation Links
Community-based HIV-prevention efforts can boost testing, help reduce new infections

In Africa and Thailand, communities that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study presented this week at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Atlanta.

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health's Project Accept a trial conducted by the HIV Prevention Trials Network to test a combination of social, behavioral and structural HIV-prevention interventions demonstrated that a series of community efforts was able to boost the number of people tested for HIV and resulted in a 14 percent reduction in new HIV infections, compared with control communities.

"These study results clearly demonstrate that high rates of testing can be achieved by going into communities and that this strategy can result in increased HIV detection, which makes referral to care possible," said Project Accept's overall principal investigator, Thomas J. Coates, who directs UCLA's Center for World Health and is an associate director of the UCLA AIDS Institute. "This has major public health benefit implications by not only linking infected individuals to care but also by encouraging testing in entire communities and therefore also reducing further HIV transmission."

The trial was conducted in 34 communities in South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe and in 14 communities in Thailand. It consisted of mobile HIV testing, post-test support services and real-time feedback.

The aim of the intervention was four-fold: (1) to increase access to voluntary counseling and testing, as well as post-test services; (2) to change community attitudes about HIV awareness and particularly about the benefit of knowing one's HIV status; (3) to remove barriers to knowing one's HIV status; and (4) to increase the safety of testing and minimize the potential negative consequences of testing by providing various forms of support.

Communities were matched into pairs based on sociodemographic, cultural and infrastructure characteristics, with one community randomly assigned to the intervention and one serving as a control for comparison. (The randomization was performed centrally, and the assignment was not blinded, due to the nature of the intervention.)

Among the findings:

  • Rates of testing were 45 percent higher in intervention communities than control communities, especially among men and young people.

  • Individuals in intervention communities, particularly those infected with HIV, reported a lower number of sexual partners and fewer multiple partners. This was particularly true among HIV-positive men, who reported 18 percent fewer sexual partners overall and 29 percent fewer concurrent sexual partners than those in control communities.

  • Diagnoses of HIV infection were higher in intervention communities.

  • Social acceptance of the importance of testing was higher in intervention communities.

  • Modest reductions in HIV incidence occurred in the intervention communities, compared with the control communities, particularly among women in the 25-to-32 age range.

Study participants who learned they were infected with HIV were directed to the study's post-test services, which included counseling and referrals to health and social services assistance. Those who tested negative were also directed to post-test services for further counseling, referrals and support to help ensure they remained uninfected. Local health authorities were thoroughly briefed on the study findings and encouraged to continue the implementation efforts.

Individuals need to be made aware of their HIV status through testing in order to receive the necessary care and treatment and learn how to prevent infection, said Dr. Wafaa El-Sadr, principal investigator of the HIV Prevention Trials Network, under whose auspices the trial was conducted.

"These study findings provide clear and compelling evidence that the provision of mobile services, combined with appropriate support activities, is a strategy that can increase testing rates and also reduce HIV incidence," she said.


Contact: Enrique Rivero
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Related medicine news :

1. Fox Chase receives grant for community-based patient navigation services
2. Scripps studies show community-based diabetes programs are key to lowered costs and improved care
3. Study implements community-based approach to treat HIV-infection in rural Uganda
4. Better ethics education needed in community-based research
5. WOW Memories Announces New Efforts to Help Support Alzheimer’s Charity Events
6. The ethics of access: Comparing 2 federal health care reform efforts
7. Projects Abroad enables volunteers to help efforts to redress global food imbalance
8. Historic legacy of lead pollution persists despite regulatory efforts
9. Drinking Can Derail Womens Efforts to Quit Smoking
10. Prevention efforts focused on youth reduce prescription abuse into adulthood
11. Report Calls for Better U.S. Efforts to Fight Counterfeit Drugs
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 25, 2015 , ... Smiles by Stevens is pleased to announce ... wrinkling. While many patients are aware of the benefits of Botox® in the treatment ... those suffering with discomfort, soreness, and pain as a result of Jaw Tension, TMJ ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ALTO, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... Smart and Beddit Classic sleep tracking systems. The new app features a more intuitive ... see and understand how well you slept. The SleepScore is created by a proprietary ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... In an ongoing Clinical Study ... (RMC) in Chicago, IL, UV Angel is evaluating the efficacy of its product and ... care units (totaling 30 beds) from May 2014 through October 2015 at a 360-bed, ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , ... November 25, 2015 , ... Today, Mothers ... our nation’s roadways has dropped below 10,000 for the first time since 2011. In ... 2013. , According to data released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... Spring, Md (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 ... ... Pulmonary Hypertension Association (PHA) announces the nation’s Periwinkle Pioneers, individuals and groups responsible ... history of this disease. The Periwinkle Pioneers, nominated by the public, will receive ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... DUBLIN , November 26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... the addition of the "Radioimmunoassay Market ... User (Hospital, Pharmaceutical Industry, Academics, Clinical Diagnostic ... - Global Forecast to 2020" report ... ) has announced the addition of the ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... -- The total global healthcare industry is expected to grow at ... America has the highest projected growth at 12.7%, ... ), is second with growth projected at 11.5%. ... expenditure. In 2013-2014, total government funded healthcare was nearly 68%. ... 41.2% in 2013-2014. In real terms, out of pocket expenditure ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 2015  Linden Care, LLC, a retail specialty pharmacy ... patients suffering from chronic pain, said today that it ... Order (TRO) enjoining Express Scripts from unilaterally terminating the ... --> --> The company said ... options. --> --> ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: