Navigation Links
Common Asthma Treatments Don't Work for Virus-Induced Wheeze
Date:1/21/2009

Preschoolers wheezing from a cold won't benefit from steroids, study finds,,,,

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Steroid medications that are commonly prescribed to improve asthma symptoms don't help ease wheezing associated with a virus in preschoolers, two new reports suggest.

One study, from British researchers, looked at the use of oral prednisolone and found no significant differences between the treated group of children and those who received a placebo. The second study, from Canadian doctors, assessed inhaled steroids for wheezing associated with a virus, and found that while preventive treatment did reduce the need for rescue medications, the benefits weren't strong enough to outweigh the potential side effects. The research was published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

"These are kids who are at the brink. We're still trying to see if they're just having viral-induced wheezing or if they really have asthma, and we've always treated these kids like they have asthma," said Dr. Jennifer Appleyard, chief of allergy and immunology at St. John Hospital in Detroit. "These studies suggest that maybe we don't need to. Maybe we should treat viral-induced wheezing differently."

Part of the problem, she explained, is that it can be difficult to tell if small children actually have asthma, or if they're just wheezing from a cold or some other virus. Babies generally wheeze due to viruses, and in school-aged children, wheeze is often indicative of asthma, but it can be hard to tell the difference in toddlers and preschoolers.

The study of oral prednisolone included 700 children between the ages of 10 months and 60 months. All had virus-induced wheezing. The children were randomly assigned to receive either a five-day course of between 10 milligrams and 20 milligrams prednisolone depending on their age or a placebo for five days.

The researchers found no statistically significant differences between the two groups using measures such as the duration of hospitalization and the need for additional medications.

"Our study provides robust evidence that a short course of oral steroids has no clinical benefit, at least for children with mild to moderately severe [wheezing] attacks," said study senior author Dr. Jonathan Grigg, a professor of pediatric respiratory and environmental medicine at Queen Mary University London.

But, Grigg added, "doctors may still prescribe a course [of oral steroids] on a case-by-case basis, especially in severe attacks."

The second study included 129 children between the ages of 1 and 6 who were randomly assigned to receive 750 micrograms of inhaled fluticasone proprionate twice daily or a placebo. Fluticasone proprionate is an inhaled steroid and is often used as a preventive medication for people with asthma. In this study, the children were given the medication or placebo at the onset of any upper respiratory infection and asked to continue the medication for a maximum of 10 days. They did this over a period of six to 12 months.

Unlike the first study, the researchers did see a slight benefit from using the preventive inhaled steroid medication, but there were also side effects, such as a smaller gain in height and weight, that probably outweighed those benefits.

"These kids have intermittent wheezing with a respiratory virus, with no wheezing in between. Maybe viral-induced wheezing isn't so much inflammation, but an irritability of the airways, so anti-inflammatories [like steroids] don't work. Maybe it's a different pathophysiology with similar symptoms. Not all wheezing is asthma in kids," Appleyard suggested.

She did point out that the findings from these studies don't apply to children with asthma, and that these medications can be very helpful in children with asthma. Children with asthma will wheeze at other times, not just when they have a virus, Appleyard noted.

More information

To learn more about available asthma treatments and how they work, visit the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.



SOURCES: Jonathan Grigg, M.D., professor, pediatric respiratory and environmental medicine, Queen Mary University London; Jennifer Appleyard, M.D., chief, allergy and immunology, St. John Hospital, Detroit; Jan. 22, 2009, New England Journal of Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Common Genes Link Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia
2. Common Flu Strain Resistant to Popular Antiviral Drug
3. Parkinsons Disease Plays Havoc With Common Orthopaedic Conditions
4. Errors involving medications common in outpatient cancer treatment
5. Stereotaxis to Raise $20 Million in Registered Direct Offering of Common Stock and Warrants
6. Mutations common to cancer and developmental disorder examined in a novel disease model
7. Common treatment for mens pelvic pain proves ineffective, Queens-led study shows
8. Common treatment for chronic prostatitis fails to reduce symptoms
9. Common infant virus may trigger type 1 diabetes
10. Migraines: Help for a common problem in children and teenagers
11. Latino Psychologist Appointed to Mental Health Post in Commonwealth
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Common Asthma Treatments Don't Work for Virus-Induced Wheeze
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... Horizon Blue ... with doctors and hospitals to make transformative changes in how health care is ... minds this week in discussing breakthroughs in cellular medicine to treat disease. After ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... Cognizin® Citicoline is one ... Nominated in the Healthy Ageing category, Cognizin® is being considered for this prestigious ... division can include everything from antioxidants, lipids, proteins, and botanicals. NutraIngredients will choose ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... Amada Senior Care, premier provider of non-medical in-home ... – its San Antonio West location. Prior to entering the senior care industry, Amada ... opening of Amada San Antonio West will take place on Friday, April 29th. ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... Surgery Education and Anzu®, developers of the AnzuMedical™ Knowledge Sharing and Collaboration ... Collaborative Residency Network. The platform is scheduled to launch in July 2016 and ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... Point ... miniature microphones and headsets announced today that the US Patent Office has approved ... into a structure. This innovative design creates a lightweight and modular audio headset ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/26/2016)... , April 26, 2016 Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. ... a management presentation at the Deutsche Bank 41 st ... 2:50 p.m. EDT. You are invited to listen ... http://ir.hill-rom.com/events.cfm or access it directly at http://edge.media-server.com/m/p/mr4uxgas . ... hour after conclusion of the live event and accessible at ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... DUBLIN , April 26, 2016 ... "Financial Assessment and Credit Risk Analysis of the Biological ... This comprehensive report analyzes the financial assessment ... China . The report provides readers ... key topics all market participants should be aware of. ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... April 26, 2016 ... 2016;9(1):16-20 DOI: http://doi.org/10.17925/USOR.2016.09.01.16 ... Published recently in US Ophthalmic Review, ... Davidson discusses how laser cataract surgery ... cataract surgery: the laser fragments the lens ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: