Navigation Links
Combat Injuries: A Matter of Life and Death
Date:4/1/2009

Fast Response by Orthopaedic Surgeons in the Combat Theater Contributes to Saving Lives

ROSEMONT, Ill., April 1 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Orthopaedic surgeons play a crucial role in the care of active duty military personnel according to a Forum article in the April 2009 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS). Surgical teams are providing treatment as soon as possible after injury, thereby saving lives and helping injured personnel obtain optimal function.

Author Capt. (Dr.) Dana C. Covey, orthopaedic surgeon from Naval Medical Center San Diego, says, "Most military personnel who die from combat trauma do so because they bleed to death. If they live through that first golden 15 minutes, they often gain another two or three critical hours. Consequently we try and get patients to our forward surgical teams as soon as possible."

"Many medical advances have been made during wartime, because it stimulates research and experimentation with new ideas. These advances play a role in survival and optimal function in people who are injured." For instance, the basis for the U.S. regional trauma center system came out of the Vietnam War. "Many advances in orthopaedics have evolved because orthopaedic surgeons are integrally involved in the treatment of those personnel with war wounds," noted Dr. Covey.

Orthopaedic surgeons are highly skilled at repairing the limb injuries that comprise approximately 70 percent of combat injuries. Those injuries are typically caused by high-energy weapons and are highly damaging to bone and soft-tissue. Injuries caused by explosive devices are common in Iraq and often combine penetrating, blunt, and burn injuries.

In Iraq, nine out of 10 wounded service members survive. This highest survival rate in history is probably the result of multiple factors including:

  • Rapid medical evacuation
  • Improved training of corpsmen, medics and other frontline personnel
  • Close proximity of highly trained medical teams in far-forward field hospitals
  • Improved body armor with ceramic plates
  • Improved vehicle armor
  • Devices to detect explosives

Small, highly mobile surgical units are being placed far forward on the battlefield to provide expedient treatment known as tactical surgical intervention. Surgical and intensive care advances have centered on improvements in the ability to stop bleeding and decrease infection. The following medical factors are helping the armed services treat wounded personnel:

  • Recombinant factor 7, a genetically engineered blood clotting factor.
  • Tourniquets are issued to all Marines, soldiers, airmen, and sailors on patrol, so they can be rapidly applied to injuries.
  • Damage control surgery techniques to stabilize severely injured patients.
  • Improved training of corpsmen and medics in treating traumatic injuries.

Another military innovation is the practice of moving casualties through a string of medical facilities with increasing expertise. Damage control orthopaedics, such as rapid amputation and fracture stabilization, is being done at the far-forward field hospital before the wounded service member is transported for systemic stabilization with blood and fluids to an ICU-equipped facility. A service member is transported from the field to a more advanced facility for additional surgery in Germany within 12 to 48 hours and eventually to the United States for rehabilitation. During the Vietnam War, this transport took an average of 45 days.

"In addition, the rapid helicopter transport that began in Korea and improved in Vietnam allowed for much greater success in the earlier repair of extremity vascular injuries compared with the methods of World War II," concluded Dr. Covey.

More information about extremity war injuries

More information about the AAOS

JBJS

Orthoinfo.org

Disclosure: The author did not receive any outside funding or grants in support of his research for or preparation of this work. Neither Capt. Covey nor a member of his immediate family received payments or other benefits or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity.


'/>"/>
SOURCE American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Copyright©2009 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Combating weight gain caused by antipsychotic treatments
2. SteriFx Inc. Provides Solutions to Combat Campylobacter
3. Experts turn to Web to combat distressing skin disease
4. The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer Reports From South Africa on Renewed Efforts to Combat HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis
5. Pelosi: Administration Will Not Force Veterans to Use Private Insurance to Pay for Treatment of Combat-Related Injuries
6. Rep. Slaughter Reintroduces Bill to Help Fight Antibiotic Resistance Crisis by Combating Misuse of Antibiotics in Animal Agriculture
7. Project Runway Designer in Houston to Educate About Living With HIV and Combat Stigma Associated With the Disease
8. Upcoming World Kidney Day Underscores Role of Low-Cost Lab Tests in Combating High-Cost Kidney Disease
9. ACSM Partnership Will Combat Childhood Obesity, Get Kids Active
10. Obio Pharmaceutical Announced New Antiviral Drug Discovery to Combat Influenza Virus
11. Photos: The American Diabetes Association, Fitness Expert Kathy Smith and Beachbody(R) Join Forces to Combat Type 2 Diabetes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/27/2016)... Park, KS (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... in retailers of Eyeglasses . , Millions of individuals in the United States ... eyeglasses have become a way to both correct vision and make a fashion statement. ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... ... blind and certified personal trainer is helping to develop a weight loss fitness plan that ... the two major problems leading the fitness industry today:, , All ... They don’t eliminate all the reasons people quit their exercise program , ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... "With 30 hand-drawn ... specific project," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProHand ... all within Final Cut Pro X . Simply select a ProHand generator and ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether ... latter, setting the bar too high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, ... their goal. , Research from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Pulmonary Hypertension Association (PHA) ... will receive two significant new grants to support its work to advance research ... anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals and scientists for their work in fighting ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 Research and ... Excipients Market by Type (Organic Chemical (Sugar, Petrochemical, Glycerin), ... Topical, Coating, Parenteral) - Global Forecast to 2021" ... The global pharmaceutical excipients market is projected ... CAGR of 6.1% in the forecast period 2016 to ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... to 2022" report to their offering. ... financial data derived from varied research sources to present unique ... on the market during the next five years, including a ... markets, regional and country level analysis. The report provides a ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Pa. , June 23, 2016 Bracket ... will launch its next generation clinical outcomes platform, Bracket eCOA ... Meeting held on June 26 – 30, 2016 in ... the first electronic Clinical Outcome Assessment product of its kind ... Booth #715. Bracket eCOA 6.0 is a flexible ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: