Navigation Links
Colon cancer risk perception associated with screening behavior
Date:4/14/2008

Womens perception of their cancer risk appears to vary by race and may affect how likely they are to undergo screenings, particularly for colon cancer, according to a report in the April 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Risk of developing and dying from cancer varies by race and ethnicity among women, according to background information in the article. For example, African Americans have the highest risk of developing colon cancer and dying from breast or cervical cancer, while Latinas have higher rates of illness and death from cervical cancer but a lower risk of breast and colon cancer. Communication of cancer risk to ethnically diverse populations of women has the potential to affect screening behavior, the authors write. With increasing epidemiological information that quantifies the risks and benefits of early detection and prevention strategies, womens perceived risk for cancer may become a more important factor in the decision to undergo screening.

Sue E. Kim, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues conducted in-person and telephone interviews regarding breast, cervical and colon cancer with 1,160 women age 50 to 80 (average age 61). Perceived personal risk for each cancer was measured on a word scale (no risk to very high risk) and compared with self-reported screening behavior by ethnicity, the authors write.

Of the women, 338 (29 percent) were white, 167 (14 percent) were African American, 239 (21 percent) were Latina and 416 (36 percent) were Asian. Perceived risk for each cancer varied by ethnicity; we found that Asian women had the lowest perceived risk for breast, cervical and colon cancers and that Latinas had the highest perceived risk, the authors write. This perceived risk was associated with obtaining self-reported cancer screening tests after other factors were accounted for.

Almost half of the participants (572) reported either a personal or family history of cancer. This type of history was associated with a higher risk perception for breast and colon cancer. Women with a family history of cancer were almost twice as likely to have undergone colonoscopy as women without a family history.

Evaluation of perceived risk of cancer may be useful to clinicians who are recommending screening tests and incorporating an intervention to help diverse populations understand risk and interpret medical data, the authors conclude.


'/>"/>

Contact: Vanessa deGier
415-514-1592
JAMA and Archives Journals
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Patient Navigators Boost Colon Screens in Urban Minorities
2. Apple pectin, apple juice extracts shown to have anticarcinogenic effects on colon
3. High-Risk Blacks Less Likely to Get Colonoscopies
4. Popular Colonoscopy Prep Solution May Pose Kidney Risks
5. African Americans less likely than whites to get colonoscopy despite family history of colon cancer
6. Fifty-Plus Community Leaders and Local Celebrities Declare Their Support for Colon-Cancer Screening Awareness Initiative
7. Vanessa Williams and Carmen Marc Valvo Make It Fashionable to Talk About Colon Cancer In New Public Service Announcement
8. A tumor of the pancreas mimicked by colonic duplication?
9. American Cancer Society Recommends Virtual Colonoscopy
10. Penn research offers road map to safer pain control, cost savings during colonoscopies
11. Video: Colon Cancer Myths Dispelled!
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... News Advisory/Interview Opportunity , After ... score a major victory in Europe for public health and the environment and is ... on rigorous scientific research and the overwhelming support of European citizens, the European Union ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... ... Woman Be Ye Healed-Passing On A Legacy”: a call to heal the wounded Church. ... author, Desiree M Webb, a registered nurse, minister of music, speaker, songwriter, recording artist, ... husband, Paul, for over twenty-nine years. Desiree enjoys writing, beach trips, ministering in ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... , ... March 23, 2017 , ... ... selected HealthiPASS, an innovative patient - centric payment system, to expand its focus ... improvements in the patient financial experience. , “At Ogden Clinic, we are ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... ... Trainer”: an electrifying and suspenseful gunslinger novel with a twist. “The Trainer” is ... an enthusiasm for action and adventure stories. , Published by Christian Faith ... at the thirty-three notches that lined the edges of the wooden grip plates of ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... ... publication of “Profiling protein expression in circulating tumor cells using microfluidic western blotting” ... use of the Vortex technology to capture CTCs and a microfluidic ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... 23, 2017 Global Colposcope Market by Manufacturers, ... Colposcope in Global market, especially in North America ... , South America , Middle East ... the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application. ... Browse 190 Tables and Figures, ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... , March 23, 2017 ... presented in Brussels , My ... change bad sun habits into life-saving ones, was ... Association (AIM). Launched in 2016, the "Nudging for ... it easy and desirable for people to change ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... , 22 de marzo de 2017   ... líder de soluciones de productos y servicios para ... que ha adquirido EPL Archives, Inc., una organización ... clientes en todo el ciclo de vida de ... una muestra de archivo, almacenamiento de documentos y ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: