Navigation Links
Clues to Why Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Humira Fails Some Patients
Date:4/12/2011

By Jenifer Goodwin
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- In a new study, close to a third of patients taking the arthritis drug Humira developed an immune system reaction to it that rendered it ineffective.

Researchers say the finding helps to explain why some people get relief from their rheumatoid arthritis symptoms while on Humira (adalimumab), which is made by Abbott Laboratories, while others gain little or no benefit. Humira belongs to a class of drugs known as biologics.

In those people for whom the drug is ineffective, the immune system realizes the drug is a foreign substance and develops antibodies to it, researchers explained. Those antibodies bind to the drug and prevent it from working.

"What the publication shows is that Humira, like many other biologic agents, may induce an immunological response against the drug," said senior study author Dr. Gerrit Jan Wolbink, a rheumatologist at Jan van Breemen Research Institute in the Netherlands. "The immunological response works against the drug. This is one of the explanations why some patients do not respond the way we hope they will."

Patients who were also taking methotrexate, another arthritis drug and an immunosuppressant, were less likely to develop the antibodies, according to the study in the April 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Researchers followed 272 patients taking Humira for about three years.

About 28 percent developed immune system antibodies against the drug. The reaction tended to happen within the first few months of starting treatment: About 67 percent of those who developed antibodies did so during the first 28 weeks.

Patients without antibodies had more of the drug circulating in their blood. Lower levels of the drug are a sign that the body's immune system is fighting the drug and it's being removed from the body, Jan Wolbink explained.

Whether or not patients developed antibodies was also linked to whether they got relief from their rheumatoid arthritis while on Humira.

Nearly half -- 48 percent -- of those without antibodies experienced a significant reduction of their arthritis symptoms while taking the drug, while only 13 percent of those who developed antidrug antibodies got similar relief.

And while 34 percent of patients without antibodies experienced remission, only 4 percent of those who developed antibodies did.

Patients who developed antibodies were also more likely to drop out of the study because of "treatment failure."

Humira is a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor, which works by blocking the action of TNF, a substance known as a cytokine that contributes to the inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions.

"If you make antibodies, then Humira doesn't block the action of TNF, and it doesn't work," Jan Wolbink said.

Dr. Olga Belostotsky, a rheumatologist and chief of allergy and immunology at Lennox Hill Hospital in New York City, said the research helps explain why some patients don't respond to Humira, and yet they do respond when switched to another drug in the same class of TNF inhibitors.

"It's because they don't have antibodies to the other drugs, even when it's another drug in the same group of medications," she said.

Belostotsky said the research suggests it's very important that patients start methotrexate to suppress the immune system before starting Humira.

What isn't known is why those 28 percent of patients developed antidrug antibodies while the rest didn't.

"Why antibodies develop in some people more than the others is unclear, and why people react more to some drugs than others is unclear," Belostotsky said.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more on rheumatoid arthritis.

SOURCES: Gerrit Jan Wolbink, M.D., Ph.D., rheumatologist, Jan van Breemen Research Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Olga Belostotsky, M.D., Ph.D., rheumatologist and chief, allergy and immunology, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Journal of the American Medical Association, April, 13, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers find possible clues to tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients
2. Genes On/Off Switches Yield Clues to Breast Cancer
3. The cerebellum provides clues to the nature of human intelligence
4. Spinal Fluid May Hold Clues to Lyme Disease, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
5. Hand Movements May Give Clues to ADHD Severity
6. Clues May Reveal When a Person Is Faking Remorse
7. Mouse Study Suggests New Clues to Celiac Disease
8. Scientists ID Genetic Clues to Parkinsons
9. Protein related to aging holds breast cancer clues
10. Ancient Toolkit Holds Clues to Migration of Early Man
11. Research provides new kidney cancer clues
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Clues to Why Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Humira Fails Some Patients
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... As health professionals work to improve their approach ... patient is doing more than filling out a survey; in many cases health professionals ... emphasis in health care and research on the importance of active engagement with patients ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... certification process to promote standards of excellence for the field of eating disorders, ... March 22 – 25, 2018 in Orlando, Florida at the Omni Resort at ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Lori R. ... a member of ElderCounsel, a national organization of elder law and special needs planning ... laws and rules. It also provides a forum to network with elder law attorneys ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The Visiting Nurse Association (VNA) of Somerset Hills is proud ... and unique items from across the nation, this holiday-themed event will raise funds and ... the VNA. The boutique will be open Saturday, November 4 (10:00 a.m. – ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House of ... popular and least understood books in the Holy Scriptures, Revelation. The Book of Revelation ... scholars for centuries. Many have tossed it off as mere rubbish, but Yisrayl Hawkins ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/2/2017)... -- Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY ) ... of 2017 on Tuesday, October 24, 2017. Lilly will ... the investment community and media to further detail the ... begin at 9 a.m. Eastern time. Investors, media and ... the conference call through a link that will be ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... 2, 2017 Halo Labs announces the European launch of ... the HORIZON at MIBio 2017 in Cambridge, U.K ... particulate matter in biopharmaceutical samples with unprecedented speed and sensitivity while ... technique Backgrounded Membrane Imaging. ... HORIZON subvisible particle analysis system ...
(Date:9/28/2017)... -- Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: HRC), will host its ... on Friday, November 3, 2017, beginning at 7:00 a.m. ... 8:30 a.m. (CDT) / 9:30 a.m. (EDT). ... and guidance for 2018, Hill-Rom executives will also highlight ... and long-range financial outlook through 2020. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: