Navigation Links
Climate change increased the number of deaths
Date:10/22/2013

The increased temperatures caused by ongoing climate change in Stockholm, Sweden between 1980 and 2009 caused 300 more premature deaths than if the temperature increase did not take place. In Sweden as a whole, it would mean about 1,500 more premature deaths, according to a study from researchers at Ume University published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Global warming does not only give a general increase in temperature, but it also increases the frequency, intensity and duration of heat waves. Previous studies have shown that these changes are associated with increased mortality, especially during extremely hot periods. It also speculated that mortality associated with extreme cold could decrease as a result of a warmer climate.

Researchers at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Ume University, conducted a study in which they examined the extent to which mortality associated with extreme temperatures occurred in Stockholm during the period 1980-2009. In order to assess what can be regarded as extreme temperatures, they compared temperature data from this period with the corresponding data for the period 1900 to 1929.

The study shows that the number of periods of extremely high temperatures increased significantly over the period 1980-2009, all of which contributed to about 300 more deaths during these heat waves than had been the case without climate change.

"Mortality associated with extreme heat during the relevant period was doubled, compared to if we had not had some climate change," says Daniel Oudin strm, PhD-student in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, who conducted the study. "Furthermore, we saw that even though the winters have become milder, extremely cold periods occurred more often, which also contributed to a small increase in mortality during the winter."

Although the increase in the number of deaths due to extreme temperature overall is quite small over a 30 year period, Daniel Oudin strm emphasises that the current study only includes the Stockholm area. If the method had been used in the whole of Sweden, or Europe, the increase in the number of deaths would have been much larger. For Sweden as a whole, it is estimated that about 1,500 extra deaths due to climate change had occurred over the past 30 years.

In addition, the researchers only examined mortality in really extreme temperatures. Therefore, the number of premature deaths caused by less extreme temperatures is not included in the study.

Daniel Oudin strm says that despite the long-standing debate about climate change, Swedes have not changed their attitude and willingness to protect themselves against extreme temperatures.

"The study findings do not suggest any adaptation of the Swedes when it comes to confronting the increasingly warmer climate, such as increased use of air conditioning in elderly housing," says Daniel Oudin strm. "It is probably because there is relatively little knowledge in regards to increased temperatures and heat waves on health."


'/>"/>

Contact: Daniel Oudin Astrom
daniel.astrom@envmed.umu.se
46-709-497-156
Umea University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Climate Change Could Be Tough on Seniors Health: Study
2. Greater L.A. Heating Up, Climate Experts Predict
3. Climate Change May Cut Cows Milk Production in South
4. Generation X is surprisingly unconcerned about climate change
5. Climate concerns
6. Some like it hot: Tropical species not as vulnerable to climate change extinction
7. Most Accurate Climate Models Point to More Global Warming
8. Climate Change May Bring Another Mosquito-Borne Illness to U.S.
9. Study shows climate change could affect onset and severity of flu seasons
10. Will Climate Change Mean Worse Flu Seasons?
11. Climate Change Could Affect Monarch Butterflys Migration, Study Says
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... “Code Word: Chocolate Biscuit”: a biographical account following a man who ... the creation of published author, Marlyn Ivey, born in Lynn Haven, Florida and at the ... and at 19 years of age, he joined the Navy and got married right out ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... NC (PRWEB) , ... January 20, 2017 , ... ... vPEP ® Oscillating Positive Expiratory Pressure (OPEP) device, was featured in a ... by Doug Pursley, MEd, RRT-ACCS, FAARC, “Analysis of Three Oscillating Positive Expiratory ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... 2017 , ... “Journey to Christmas:” a beautiful and enchanting tale that teaches children the true ... mother of three in Oklahoma City, and a devoted woman of faith. , “Becoming ... been in the back of my mind for years, but actually doing it might have ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... “The Land of More ... to the issue of world hunger, and shares the simple and achievable answer. “The ... husband and member of the Fairview Missionary Church in Angola, Indiana where he works ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... ... the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced over 359,000 clinicians are ... who participate in APMs are paid for the quality of care they give to ... a system that delivers better care and one in which clinicians work together to ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... 19, 2017 Pfizer joins ... Milner Therapeutics Consortium   Major research ... Cambridge   The Milner Therapeutics ... ) as a partner to the Milner Therapeutics Consortium. ... the efficient transfer of materials between industry and academia ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... The global  pacemaker market  is expected to reach USD 12.3 billion by ... prevalence of cardiac conditions coupled with the availability of medical coverage is a ... in these devices are supporting the expansion of this vertical. ... ... View Research Logo ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 18, 2017 The Global Therapy Partnering Terms ... to partnering deals and agreements entered into by the ... deals - Top deals by value - Deals listed ... type The report provides understanding and access to ... world,s leading healthcare companies. The report provides an ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: