Navigation Links
Chronic Worry Linked to Higher Risk of PTSD
Date:12/28/2012

FRIDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Constant worriers are at increased risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a new study.

Many people experience traumatic events -- such as witnessing violence, being assaulted or the death of a loved one -- but only a few develop PTSD, noted study author Naomi Breslau, a professor of epidemiology at Michigan State University.

People with PTSD feel stressed and fearful after experiencing or seeing a dangerous event long after the danger is over.

"So the question is, 'What's the difference between those who develop PTSD and the majority who don't.' This paper says people who are habitually anxious are more vulnerable. It's an important risk factor," Breslau said in a university news release.

The study included about 1,000 people who answered questions meant to assess their level of neuroticism, which is marked by chronic anxiety, depression and a tendency to overreact to everyday challenges and disappointments.

Over 10 years of follow-up, half of the participants experienced a traumatic event. People who had higher levels of neuroticism at the start of the study were more likely to be among the 5 percent who developed PTSD.

The study was released online in advance of publication in an upcoming print issue of the journal Psychological Medicine.

Breslau pointed out in the news release that "there have been studies of neuroticism and PTSD, but they've all been retrospective," or in other words, looking back in time. This study assessed participants' personalities prior to their traumatic experience. "We're never sure of the order of things in a retrospective study. This study sets it in a clear time order," which makes the findings very persuasive, she said.

While there's not much that can be done to prevent PTSD, these findings may help doctors to identify people at the highest risk and respond accordingly when they experience a traumatic event, Breslau said.

"We need to be concerned about people with previous psychiatric disorders if there's some kind of catastrophe. The main thing is that doctors have to look after their patients, ask them questions and get to know them," she advised.

While the study found an association between chronic worry and development of PTSD, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more about post-traumatic stress disorder.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Michigan State University, news release, Dec. 17, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Chronicling pink slimes fall from grace
2. Adjusting Your Attitude About Chronic Pain May Help You Sleep
3. Chronic cocaine use triggers changes in brains neuron structure
4. Chronic Heartburn May Boost Risk for Esophageal Cancer
5. Should oxygen be used for patients with chronic heart failure?
6. Researchers identify a life-and-death molecule on chronic leukemia cells
7. Understanding the links between inflammation and chronic disease
8. Marker distinguishes more-aggressive from less-aggressive forms of chronic leukemia
9. Study examines chronic inflammation in oral cavity and HPV status of head and neck cancers
10. Recent Report Reveals Dramatic Increase in Chronic Disease in Pets
11. Analysis of KRYSTEXXA phase III data demonstrates improved health-related quality of life and physical function in refractory chronic gout patients
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Chronic Worry Linked to Higher Risk of PTSD
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and ... explains one of the most popular and least understood books in the Holy Scriptures, ... puzzling descriptions that have baffled scholars for centuries. Many have tossed it off as ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... services for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range of technology and ... for Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held October 14–18, 2017 ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... The American College of Medical Informatics ... PhD, FACMI, during the Opening Session of AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. AMIA’s ... of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field of medical informatics, this prestigious ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Leading pediatric oncology experts at Children’s National Health System ... Congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) Oct. 12-15. Chaired by ... and Blood Disorders at Children’s National, and Stephen P. Hunger, M.D., Chief of ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Vohra Chief Medical Officer ... physician colleagues, skilled nursing facility medical directors and other clinicians at various events ... Care." , "At many of these conferences we get to educate other physicians, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/18/2017)... 2017 EpiVax, Inc. ("EpiVax") a ... immune engineering, today announced a new NIH-funded ... ... and presents a challenge for traditional flu ... be effective. Using state-of-the-art bioinformatics and molecular modeling methods, ...
(Date:9/12/2017)... NEW YORK , Sept. 12, 2017   EcoVadis , the ... chains, has published the first annual edition of its Global CSR Risk ... 20,400 companies evaluated by EcoVadis, based on Scorecard Ratings that analyzed nearly ... ... Performance Index ...
(Date:9/12/2017)... Sept. 12, 2017  ValGenesis Inc., the global ... is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. ... its Board of Directors and Chairman of Advisory ... life science companies to manage their entire validation ... paper in this process. Furthermore, ValGenesis VLMS enables ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: