Navigation Links
Chromosome 21 abnormality tells oncologists to treat pediatric ALL more aggressively

A recent study by members of the Children's Oncology Group reports results of a large trial showing that children whose leukemia cells have amplification of a portion of chromosome 21 may require more aggressive treatment for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) than children without this gene amplification.

"This helps identify patients who need more therapy than they may otherwise get," says Stephen Hunger, MD, investigator at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and director of the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children's Hospital Colorado.

Hunger notes that this genetic abnormality was first described in 2003 and has subsequently been found in about 2 percent of pediatric ALL patients. Initial reports described poor outcomes for small groups of children with this abnormality, but the current study is by far the largest and shows the importance of this genetic abnormality even with modern treatments. The study documents the treatments and outcomes of more than 8,000 cases of pediatric ALL.

"What we found is that when this genetic abnormality is present in children with good risk features who get a standard level of treatment, there is more treatment failure than with similar, low-risk kids who don't have this genetic marker. But with kids whose risk features already dictate more aggressive treatment, this genetic abnormality doesn't seem to be associated with a worse outcome, because kids are already getting the appropriate treatment. Recognizing this abnormality could help us treat even otherwise low-risk kids more aggressively up front leading to improved cure rates," Hunger says.

Specifically, the genetic abnormality is defined as four or more copies of the gene RUNX1, located on an abnormal chromosome 21. And this amplification is already detected as a byproduct of another genetic test standard in pediatric ALL, namely a test for fusion of this RUNX1 gene with the gene ETV6.

"In a sense, the testing comes for free with other testing you're already doing," Hunger says.

A study published by the same group in 2012 showed that pediatric ALL cure rates are at or above 90.4 percent.

"In early 1960s this disease was incurable," Hunger says. "Then in the late 1960s, the cure rate was 10 percent. Now 90 percent of children and adolescents diagnosed with ALL will be cured. Still, a 90-percent survival rate is little consolation to the 10 percent of families whose child doesn't survive. There's still more work to be done."


Contact: Garth Sundem
University of Colorado Denver

Related medicine news :

1. Warwick scientists uncover how checkpoint proteins bind chromosomes
2. Mutations impair childhood growth and development by disrupting organization of chromosome pairs
3. Documenting womens experiences with chromosome abnormalities found in new prenatal test
4. Research reveals new understanding of X chromosome inactivation
5. Caloric restriction has a protective effect on chromosomes
6. Scientists discover how chromosomes keep their loose ends loose
7. Blame Common Colds on Your Chromosome Caps?
8. New Comprehensive Chromosome Screening Program at Pacific Fertility Center Refines Embryo Selection, Improves Pregnancy Rates
9. Dual systems key to keeping chromosomes intact
10. Spanish researchers link cancer to failures in chromosome protection for the first time
11. Study Pinpoints New Abnormality in Athletes Heart
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... “The Journey: From the Mountains ... possible to save lost souls in the Philippines. “The Journey: From the Mountains to ... dedicated teacher of the Bible. She has taught all ages and currently teaches a ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... LA (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... Planet ... in the U.S., announced today its plans to open a flagship location in Covington, ... occupy the former Rooms To Go store next to Office Depot in the Holiday ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... ... Asante, a nationally recognized health system in southern Oregon, ... health joint venture through an agreement, effective October 1, 2017, to create AccentCare ... company with Asante, delivering clinically integrated care, for the past eight years. This ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Leading pediatric oncology experts at Children’s National Health System ... Congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) Oct. 12-15. Chaired by ... and Blood Disorders at Children’s National, and Stephen P. Hunger, M.D., Chief of ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... in property taxes a year. In some states—like New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, ... contrast, many overseas retirement havens have extremely low property-tax rates, which contributes to ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... 2017  Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. ("Hill-Rom") (NYSE: HRC), today ... Las Piedras, Puerto Rico , where ... Following a comprehensive ... minor structural damage, temporary loss of power and minimal ... completed, manufacturing operations have resumed, and the company expects ...
(Date:10/7/2017)... , Oct. 6, 2017   Provista, ... more than $100 billion in purchasing power, today announced ... and information. The Newsroom is the online ... industry trends, infographics, expert bios, news releases, slideshows and ... access to a wealth of resources at their fingertips, ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... Oct. 4, 2017  According to the Centers for Disease Control and ... October . PhysicianOne Urgent Care is helping communities across Massachusetts ... , by offering no-cost* flu shots through the end of the ... certain health insurance regulations. ... time to get a flu shot is by the end of October, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: