Navigation Links
Children who overestimate their popularity less likely to be bullies
Date:8/9/2013

NEW YORK CITY -- Children who overestimate their popularity are less likely to be bullies than those who underestimate or hold more accurate assessments of their social standing, finds new research to be presented at the 108th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association.

"The more kids overestimated their popularity, the less aggression they displayed," said Jennifer Watling Neal, an assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University. "This means that kids who were more accurate in their assessment of their number of friends or who underestimated their quantity of friends compared to peer report were more aggressive."

Past research has suggested that children who believe they are more competent or well liked than their peers or teachers view them are more aggressive. "But our research suggests there are certain types of positive perceptual biases that have a 'bright side,'" said Neal, who co-authored the study with Elise Cappella, an assistant professor of applied psychology at New York University. "When kids say they have more friends than their peers say they have, those children are actually less aggressive."

This finding was true for both overtly (e.g., hitting, kicking, or threatening to beat up others) and relationally (e.g., excluding others or spreading rumors) aggressive behavior.

The study relied on a survey of 421, mostly African American, second through fourth graders from five public elementary schools in an urban midwestern city. The survey, which was administered in individual classrooms, provided students with the opportunity to identify their friends and the friends of their peers in the class in which they were surveyed. Students also identified classmates who were bullies.

"Children who overestimated their popularity compared to peer report were less likely to be nominated by their peers as overtly or relationally aggressive," Neal said.

The researchers said there could be several reasons why students who overestimate their popularity do not feel the need to bully others. "Kids who overestimate their social connections may also perceive that more peers are watching and judging their behaviors," Neal said. "Children may be less likely to engage in aggressive behaviors that may be observed by, and place into jeopardy, their perceived social connections."

Another possible reason is that students who overestimate their social connections may be nice, sociable kids who believe they are friends with everyone. "On the other hand, aggressive children -- especially those who use forms of aggression such as rumor spreading -- may be more exclusive in who they report as their friends, leading to less overestimation," Neal said.

As for why some students overestimate their social connections, Neal said, "Kids naturally vary in their ability to accurately perceive classroom social connections and their own social positions in the classroom. It's not surprising that some children think they have a lot more friends than they actually do."


'/>"/>

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. UC Davis Children's Hospital Study Finds Telemedicine Consultations Significantly Improve Pediatric Care in Rural Emergency Rooms
2. Family members of children with cancer may also be at risk
3. Newly Released Parenting Upward Guide: Crafted for the Adult Children of the 10,000 Baby Boomers Turning 65 Every Day
4. New initiative could help improve surgical outcomes in children, study suggests
5. Children with elevated blood pressure dont get recommended follow-up, few at risk for hypertension
6. 50% Off Children’s Tableware at Online Party Store
7. Sensitive parenting can boost premature childrens school performance
8. Connecticut Children's Medical Center Physician Awarded Prestigious National Award
9. Disabled children treated more harshly in developing world
10. Outlook with Ben Kingsley Exploring Sports Injuries in Children
11. New study finds increase in nonfatal food-related choking among children in the US
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/21/2017)... PA (PRWEB) , ... April 21, 2017 , ... ... firm in Allegheny County that offers services to communities throughout the greater Pittsburgh ... in a charity drive to provide adaptive bicycles for differently-abled children. , Variety ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... ... The Patient Advocacy Community of The Beryl Institute presented Eve DeVaro, Director, ... Advocacy Award in recognition of her extraordinary contributions to the field of patient ... Beryl Institute’s annual Patient Experience Conference on March 20 in Denver, Colorado. ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... 21, 2017 , ... Crossover Symmetry , an evidence ... active lifestyle company that provides Human Performance Training and education to tactical athletes. ... responders, military officers and others in service through the development and conditioning of ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Airway Management, the medical device manufacturer of ... and well renowned Asian distributor, Discovery Sleep. The agreement involves the ... and will stabilize and strengthen Airway’s presence with a dedicated, reputable medical device ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... ... candidates to serve on its Accreditation and Standards Committees to support the ... is improving image quality and reducing patient radiation dose,” reports Eliot Siegel, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2017)... , April 19, 2017  New research provides evidence that ... Parkinson,s, according to a study released today that will be ... Meeting in Boston , April 22 ... the treatment of Parkinson,s disease, the oral drug levodopa has ... and longevity. But as the disease progresses, the effects of ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... Ohio , April 18, 2017  Cardinal Health ... Non-GAAP 1 fiscal 2017 earnings per share (EPS) ... and 2019.  This is in conjunction with this morning,s ... Deep Vein Thrombosis and Nutritional Insufficiency businesses. ... from continuing operations will be at the bottom of ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has announced the ... to their offering. ... arthroscopy devices market to grow at a CAGR of 6.35% during ... Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis ... and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: