Navigation Links
Children exposed to lead 3 times more likely to be suspended from school
Date:8/14/2013

MADISON, Wis. Children who are exposed to lead are nearly three times more likely to be suspended from school by the 4th grade than children who are not exposed, according to a new University of Wisconsin-Madison study funded jointly by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Wisconsin Partnership Program Education and Research Committee.

"Students who are suspended from school are at greater risk of dropping out, twice as likely to use tobacco, and more likely to engage in violent behavior later in life," says first author Michael Amato, a doctoral candidate in psychology and the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at UW-Madison. "Our study found that children exposed to lead were more than twice as likely to be suspended in the 4th grade, which means that lead may be more responsible for school discipline problems than many people realize."

Nationally, African-American students are three times more likely to be suspended than white students. The same discipline gap was found in the Wisconsin study, but 23 percent of the disparity was explained by differences in rates of lead exposure. Many previous studies have documented disparities in school discipline, but few have specified the underlying factors.

"We knew that lead exposure decreases children's abilities to control their attention and behavior, but we were still surprised that exposed children were so much more likely to be suspended," said Sheryl Magzamen, a public health researcher who also worked on the UW-Madison study. Magzamen is now an assistant professor at the University of Oklahoma.

Researchers cross-referenced medical data of nearly 4,000 children exposed to lead with 4th grade disciplinary records in the Milwaukee school district. They found that children who had been exposed to lead were nearly three times more likely to be suspended in the fourth grade than children who had not been exposed, even after controlling for income, race/ethnicity, and gender.

Experiments on non-human animals prove that lead exposure causes decreased attention and decreased control over behavior when subjects are startled or touched. The study team reasoned that if exposed children were affected the same way, they would be more likely to engage in disruptive classroom behaviors that could result in suspension. The results of the study supported that hypothesis.

"Children exposed to lead don't get a fair start and it affects them for their whole lives," adds study coauthor Colleen Moore, a UW-Madison psychology professor emerita affiliated with the Nelson Institute.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, African-American children are more than twice as likely as whites to have elevated lead levels. The reason, say the researchers, is that African-American children are more likely to live in lower-income neighborhoods and rental housing where lead remains in the buildings and soil, a common situation in major American cities.

Moore notes that in the city of Milwaukee, lead abatement orders are currently active in more than 100 residential properties. "It would be great to see more landlords get on board to make their housing lead-safe," she said. "Future generations depend on it."

"Everyone agrees there is a big problem with disparities in education," says Amato. "This study shows that lead is a part of the problem. There is only one way to reduce lead's harmful effects, and that is to remove it from the environments where children live and play."


'/>"/>

Contact: Mike Amato
amato@wisc.edu
617-538-7270
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Eye Care Center to Give Away Backpacks Filled With School Supplies to Children
2. Children with allergy, asthma may be at higher risk for ADHD
3. InventHelp® Client Develops Portable Sanitizer for Handling Children (DLL-2480)
4. CheapCPAPSupplies.com Now Offers Help for Children with Childhood Sleep Apnea
5. Certain major birth defects associated with moderately increased cancer risk in children
6. Reliv Kalogris Foundation Dedicates Nutrition Center for Impoverished Children in the Philippines
7. Research examines parents use of bibliotherapy to help children struggling with social issues
8. Children who overestimate their popularity less likely to be bullies
9. UC Davis Children's Hospital Study Finds Telemedicine Consultations Significantly Improve Pediatric Care in Rural Emergency Rooms
10. Family members of children with cancer may also be at risk
11. Newly Released Parenting Upward Guide: Crafted for the Adult Children of the 10,000 Baby Boomers Turning 65 Every Day
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/16/2017)... ... ... California Southern University has named Dr. Steven Beazley University President. ... a core faculty member, teaching master’s and doctoral courses in the university’s School of ... where he earned his Doctor of Psychology degree in 1998. Dr. Beazley also has ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... ... 16, 2017 , ... With the Grand Opening Event planned for February 3, ... sports teams and the general public. Built in five months by Centerpoint, the 60,000 ... into basketball or pickleball courts. The space is also suitable for indoor soccer and ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... ... January 16, 2017 , ... As New York’s ... Victor Giamos, MD to their medical staff, according to eye surgeon, Jeffrey Martin, ... Eye Care, a division of SightMD. Dr. Giamos will practice primarily out of ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... , ... January 16, 2017 , ... ... their recent partnership with an innovator in the wheelchair accessibility industry, BraunAbility ... their dealer salespeople to sell wheelchair accessible vehicles. With this new incentive plan, ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... ... January 16, 2017 , ... ... Aesthetic Surgery Journal , the official journal of The American Society for Aesthetic ... retraction surgery. The procedure is designed to correct drooping, retracted lower eyelids, which ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/16/2017)...  This report by Persistence Market Research examines ... the period 2016–2024. The primary objective of the ... to market opportunities in the global peripherally inserted ... the various dynamics that are expected to influence ... global peripherally inserted central catheters market over the ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... 2017   The Harrington Discovery Institute ... , has announced the 2017 recipients of ... of physician-scientists whose research shows promise to advance ... Discovery Institute – part of The Harrington Project ... in academic medicine: to advance early breakthroughs into ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... PORTLAND, Oregon and PUNE, India ... report published by Allied Market Research, titled, "Vital Signs Monitoring ... and Industry Forecast, 2014-2022", projects that the global vital signs ... and is expected to reach $5,491 million by 2022, growing ... North America was the leading regional market ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: