Navigation Links
Childhood Abuse Tied to Food Addiction in Women: Study
Date:5/31/2013

FRIDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Women who suffered severe physical or sexual abuse as children are much more likely than others to develop a food addiction, researchers say.

Because women with food addiction are more likely to be overweight, the study authors suggested their findings could shed light on potential causes of food addiction and obesity, and lead to improved treatment strategies.

More than one-third of American women experienced some form of physical or sexual abuse as children or teens, according to the study. Some studies have suggested that the resulting stress drives these females to eat sugary, high-calorie "comfort" foods.

"Women with histories of trauma who show a propensity toward uncontrolled eating could potentially be referred for prevention programs, while obese women might be screened for early trauma and addiction-like eating so that any psychological impediments to weight loss could be addressed," said the study leader, Susan Mason, of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston.

"Of course, preventing childhood abuse in the first place would be the best strategy of all," Mason said, "but in the absence of a perfect child abuse prevention strategy, it is important that we try to head off its negative long-term health consequences."

For the study, published in a recent online edition of the journal Obesity, the researchers examined information compiled in 2001 on more than 57,000 women involved in the Nurses' Health Study II. Specifically, they analyzed histories on any physical or sexual abuse the women faced in childhood. The investigators also examined data collected in 2009 on any significant addiction-like eating behaviors the women developed later in life.

The study revealed that 8 percent of the participants had a food addiction. In addition, the researchers found that the women who were abused physically or sexually before age 18 were nearly twice as likely as others to develop a food addiction by the time they were middle-aged adults.

For women who endured both physical and sexual abuse, the odds of developing a food addiction were even greater, according to a journal news release. The study showed the prevalence of food addiction varied from 6 percent among women who were not abused to 16 percent among those who faced severe physical and sexual abuse.

The findings do not prove that childhood abuse causes food addiction in adulthood, Mason's team noted. More studies on this association are needed before any conclusions can be made about a causal link. If future research does support their findings, the next step would be to develop strategies to reduce the risk of food addiction among women who were abused as children, the researchers noted.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about child abuse.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: Obesity, news release, May 29, 2013


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. New study identifies promising, achievable solutions to Nigerias childhood mortality crisis
2. Symptomatic behaviour in childhood strongly predicts psychiatric treatment as a young adult
3. Study identifies potential treatment for lethal childhood leukemia
4. Childhood Obesity May Raise Odds of Adult Liver Cancer
5. IADR/AADR publish studies on severe early childhood caries - proposes new classification
6. Could the Childhood Obesity Epidemic Be Ebbing?
7. Better health in adulthood starts with early prevention in childhood
8. Environment key to preventing childhood disabilities
9. Treating childhood obesity: A family affair
10. Pneumonia and preterm birth complications are the leading causes of childhood death
11. Experimental Drug Helps Fight Some Childhood Cancers, Study Finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Childhood Abuse Tied to Food Addiction in Women: Study
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... ... Florida Hospital presents Heart Health Awareness night on Sunday February 14th, as ... The puck drops at 6:00pm, but fans will have the opportunity to experience the ... The MEGA Heart will be located on Ford Thunder Alley and provide fans with ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... The president released a FY 2017 ... but would shift more of the cost burden to military beneficiaries. , MOAA’s ... in the defense budget as including limited quantifiable benefit fixes mixed with numerous beneficiary ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... discuss how to improve care by making data on heart procedures public and ... Summit on Transparency and Public Reporting of Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Outcomes ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... Atlantic Information Services, ... Benefit Model: A Case Study for Plans and Purchasers.” Executives from Intel Corp. ... with Intel on value-based health benefits program Connected Care, will discuss the challenges ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... 11, 2016 , ... "What holds you back from ... a question as a challenge for his readers to examine the full scale ... (published by Partridge Singapore), Clarke explores the subject with more depth, revealing time-honored ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... , February 11, 2016 --> ... of a new research report, titled "Sports Medicine Devices Market ... 2013 - 2019". According to the report, the global sports ... CAGR from 2013 to 2019, growing from a value of ... --> --> The global sports ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , February 11, 2016 Jeffrey ... Worldwide Clinical Trials, will present at this year,s Summit for ... Hyatt Regency in Miami, FL. Zucker ... to optimize study execution, supporting SCOPE,s "Improving Site Study Activation ... place on Thursday, Feb. 25 at 11:05 a.m. ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... F ast access ... at the point of need ... medical information products and services, has launched a ClinicalKey mobile ... a mobile device. Elsevier designed the mobile app to allow users to ... available in Android and iOS formats for mobile ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: