Navigation Links
Chest X-rays can help predict which H1N1 patients are at greatest risk

OAK BROOK, Ill. A new study published in the April issue of Radiology suggests that chest x-rays may play an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of H1N1 influenza by predicting which patients are likely to become sicker.

"Working in the emergency room is very stressful and physicians need information fast," said lead author Galit Aviram, M.D., head of cardiothoracic imaging in the Department of Radiology at Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center in Tel Aviv, Israel. "Our study provides significant findings that will help clinicians triage patients presenting with clinically suspected H1N1 influenza."

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the H1N1 virus is the predominant influenza virus in circulation during the 2009-2010 flu season. The CDC estimates that between April 2009 and January 2010 there have been approximately 57 million cases of H1N1 in the U.S., resulting in 257,300 hospitalizations and 11,686 deaths.

As in past pandemics, the virus can occur in waves. It is possible that the U.S. could experience additional waves of the virus throughout 2010.

In the study, Dr. Aviram's research team analyzed the chest x-rays of 97 consecutive patients with flu-like symptoms and laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of H1N1, admitted to the emergency department of Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center between May and September 2009. The researchers then correlated the x-ray findings with adverse patient outcomes.

"To our knowledge, this is the largest series describing the presentation of chest x-ray findings in patients diagnosed with H1N1 influenza," Dr. Aviram said.

The chest x-rays revealed abnormal findings for 39 of the patients, five (12.8 percent) of whom experienced adverse outcomes, including death or the need for mechanical ventilation. For the other 58 patients, chest x-ray findings were normal, although two (3.4 percent) of the patients experienced adverse outcomes. The mean age of patients in the study, which included 53 men and 44 women, was 40.4 years.

"Abnormal findings in the periphery of both lungs and in multiple zones of the lungs were associated with poor clinical outcomes," Dr. Aviram said.

Although a normal chest x-ray did not exclude the possibility of an adverse outcome, Dr. Aviram said the study's findings can help physicians better identify high-risk H1N1 patients who require close monitoring.

"In H1N1, as in various types of community-acquired pneumonia, initial chest x-rays may not show abnormalities that develop later in the course of the disease," Dr. Aviram explained. "Further x-rays should be performed according to the patient's clinical course."


Contact: Linda Brooks
Radiological Society of North America

Related medicine news :

1. News briefs from the February issue of Chest
2. Medichest Launches Learning Search
3. Four-Year-Old Heart Surgery Patient to Lead Thousands as Grand Marshal of Important Fundraising Event for Maria Fareri Childrens Hospital at Westchester Medical Center
4. RMA of CT Doctor Named One of Westchester Magazine's 'Best MDs'
5. Rcadia COR Analyzer(R) System Demonstrates Potential in Emergency Department Triage of Chest Pain Patients at Low to Moderate Risk of Coronary Artery Disease
6. News briefs from the January issue of Chest
7. Quick Chest Pain Test Simplifies Discharge Decision
8. Concentra, American Showa to Open Associates Health Center in Blanchester, Ohio
9. Kids Tai Chi Workout Premieres in Westchester, New York, March 2, 2010
10. News briefs from the March issue of Chest
11. Chest X-rays Can Help Predict Which H1N1 Patients Are at Greatest Risk
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... ... In an age where the cost of energy is rising, Susquehanna ... in 2009. The Williamsport Regional Medical Center (WRMC) campus has grown 50 percent since ... , According to Facilities Management Administrative Director Dieter Reichmann, this is the result ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... NavaFit Inc. today announced the ... others to train with, participate in local fitness & sporting events, and stay ... , “As high medical costs drive us to get more serious about fitness and ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... Altec Products, Inc., ... Sponsorship of Synergy 2015. The annual WennSoft KEY2ACT user conference will take place ... will unite customers, partners, WennSoft team members and sponsors to facilitate the sharing ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth ... throughout Georgia, along with affiliate organizations, Alabama Partnership for Telehalth (ATP) and Florida ... for Fall 2015. , Each of the three conferences share this year’s ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... Local Gold’s Gym franchise owner, Bryce Berry, ... August 26. Berry, who owns and operates Gold's Gym Cheyenne in Cheyenne, ... Gyms in the United States. A brand leader in global fitness, Gold’s Gyms are ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2015)...  In a Sutter Institute of Medical Research study ... and Psychiatry, the blood product intravenous immunoglobulin, or IVIG, ... in patients in the early, pre-dementia phase of Alzheimer,s ... IVIG, extracted from the plasma of more than 1,000 ... protein found in patients with Alzheimer,s disease. Sutter Institute ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... 2015 Leadership of the National Association of Vision ... Aspasia Shappet , CEO of MESVision resumed her role ... Board at its annual strategic planning meeting in ... of the organization from May 2013 to May of this ... as a result of the increased demands of his recent ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... 12, 2015  CME Group,s Center for Innovation ... of Theranos, is the 11 th recipient of the ... revolutionary blood diagnostics company, Theranos , to change health ... a new era of preventive care. CME Group will present ... Conference in Naples, Florida , on ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: