Navigation Links
Changing the common rule to increase minority voices in research
Date:10/21/2013

ATLANTA -- An article to be published in the American Journal of Public Health recommends changing the federal regulations that govern oversight of human subjects research ("the Common Rule") to address continued underrepresentation of minorities in research studies.

Co-written by Bill Rencher (M.P.H. '12), health access program director of the consumer advocacy nonprofit Georgia Watch, and Leslie Wolf, Georgia State University professor of law, the article, "Redressing Past Wrongs: Changing the Common Rule to Increase Minority Voices in Research," is part of a special issue on the Ethics of Human Subjects Research in Minority Populations.

The article responds to the underrepresentation of African-Americans and other minorities in research, an important public health problem because numerous diseases and health conditions, regardless of income, age, or gender, disproportionately affect these populations. Without adequate representation of minority populations in research, these health disparities will likely persist.

There are many reasons for the underrepresentation of minorities in research. Many point to the Tuskegee study in which the U.S. government followed hundreds of poor, rural African-American men with untreated syphilis for 40 years as a cause of mistrust in research.

However, "the history of medical and research abuses dates to slavery," Rencher says. "African-Americans may be disinclined to participate because of long-standing suspicion with the medical establishment." They also may lack access to care, which means they are not asked to participate in the first place, and see few minority physicians or researchers.

"We recommend treating minorities as a vulnerable population for regulatory purposes, as is done for children, prisoners and pregnant women," Wolf says, "to focus the attention of those overseeing the studies. We continue to have problematic studies involving minority populations. Our hope is creating special regulatory provisions will focus attention in ways that eliminate these problematic studies."

The article also suggests greater community consultation and increasing minority representation on Institutional Review Boards, organizations charged with reviewing research studies, to better provide greater minority input into the research oversight system.

Rencher and Wolf hope more attention to the concerns of communities affected will facilitate research that can find solutions to the health inequities that persist in the United States.

"The changes we're recommending alone are not going to solve the problem. There need to be other structural changes, such as more minority researchers and physicians. But we hope our article gets the conversation started," Rencher says.

The collaboration with Wolf on the article resulted from taking her human subject research course, which Rencher, an attorney, took as an elective for his master of public heath degree through Georgia State's new School of Public Health.


'/>"/>

Contact: Renee DeGross Valdes
rvaldes@gsu.edu
404-664-7416
Georgia State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. The Changing Face of Cervical Cancer in China
2. Living better with heart failure by changing what you eat
3. Pathologists’ Changing Roles – Leadership Not Just Analytics in the Patient-Centered Era
4. Changing part of central line could reduce hospital infections
5. UCI-led study creates new memories by directly changing the brain
6. Atlanta Auto Accident Lawyer at Stokes & Kopitsky, P.A. Discusses Dangers of Changing Tires After Siblings Killed
7. Biomarker assessment in suspected ACS could be practice-changing: BIC-8 results
8. Changing Lives Through the Gift of a Smile
9. Growing share of HIV/AIDS burden shifts to changing group of regions
10. Hay House’s Next Life Changer - "Around 3 Million Stress, Anxiety & Panic Sufferers Have Turned To Us For Life Changing Help," Says Linden Recovery's Charles Linden
11. Embark on Four New Ocean Adventures with WPBT2’s Changing Seas this June
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... 29, 2017 , ... AngioGenesis Labs sold 300 bottles of ... Labs, makers of HeartBoost, BrainBest and BeautyBest, achieved these results while doing a ... over the counter heart healthy drink, can reduce Arterial Plaque, Lower Blood Pressure, ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... ... in Carnegie, OK, from Dr. Jamie Cameron, with or without a referral. ... to traditional orthodontic treatment. Depending on each patient’s case, treatment with the FASTBRACES ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... Md., and MINNETONKA, Minn. (PRWEB) , ... March ... ... the development of medical office buildings (MOBs) and other outpatient facilities, and who ... project to look exclusively at those questions, Revista and Healthcare Real Estate Insights ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... 2017 , ... An inventor from Raynham, Mass., knows the ... conjunction with my braces always rubbed against the inside of my cheeks, causing ... problem." The O.B.S. was the result of his brainstorming. , This patent-pending invention ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... Immunotherapy has emerged as one of ... and is touted to be the next revolution in our fight against this complex ... the form of immune checkpoint inhibitors such as PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors. , While ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/29/2017)... 2017  Zynex (OTCQB: ZYXI), an innovative medical technology company ... devices for pain management, stroke rehabilitation, cardiac monitoring and ... Company,s 2016 full-year investor webcast on Monday, April 3, 2017 at 9:00 ... Company expects to file its 2016 full year financial ... ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... 29, 2017 According to a new market research ... Detectors, Geiger Muller, Survey Meter, Solid-State), Products (Personal Dosimeters, OSL, Badges), Safety ... by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to reach USD 1,215.4 Million by ... from 2016 to 2021. Continue Reading ... ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... Pharmaceutical Care Management Association (PCMA) today released the following ... spending: According to the ... amount spent out-of-pocket for drugs continues to decline, projected ... from 23% in 2006. Rising drug ... Health plans don,t have unlimited funds to pay first ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: