Navigation Links
Cell death mystery yields new suspect for cancer drug development
Date:9/13/2012

A mysterious form of cell death, coded in proteins and enzymes, led to a discovery by UNC researchers uncovering a prime suspect for new cancer drug development.

CIB1 is a protein discovered in the lab of Leslie Parise, PhD , professor and chair of the department of biochemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The small calcium binding protein is found in all kinds of cells.

Cassandra Moran, DO, was a pediatric oncology fellow at UNC prior to accepting a faculty position at Duke University. She is interested in neuroblastoma, a deadly form of childhood brain cancer. While working in the Parise lab at UNC as a resident, she found that decreasing CIB1 in neuroblastoma cells caused cell death.

Cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth, so the ability to cause cancer cell death in the lab is exciting to researchers but the UNC team couldn't figure out how it was happening.

Tina Leisner, PhD, a UNC research associate in biochemistry, picked up where Dr. Moran left off when she returned to her clinical training.

"It was a mystery how loss of CIB1 was causing cell death. We knew that it wasn't the most common mechanism for programmed cell death, called apoptosis, which occurs when enzymes called caspases become activated, leading to the destruction of cellular DNA. These cells were not activating caspases, yet they were dying. It was fascinating, but frustrating at the same time," said Leisner.

What Dr. Leisner and her colleagues found, in the end, is that CIB1 is a master regulator of two pathways that cancer cells use to avoid normal mechanisms for programmed cell death. These two pathways, researchers believe, create "alternate routes" for cell survival and proliferation that may help cancer cells outsmart drug therapy. When one pathway is blocked, the other still sends signals downstream to cause cancer cell survival.

"What we eventually discovered is that CIB1 sits on top of two cell survival pathways, called PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK. When we knock out CIB1, both pathways grind to a halt. Cells lose AKT signaling, causing another enzyme called GAPDH to accumulate in the cell's nucleus.Cells also lose ERK signaling, which together with GAPDH accumulation in the nucleus cause neuroblastoma cell death. In the language of people who aren't biochemists, knocking out CIB1 cuts off the escape routes for the cell signals that cause uncontrolled growth, making CIB1 a very promising drug target," said Dr. Parise.

This multi-pathway action is key to developing more effective drugs. Despite the approval of several targeted therapies in recent years, many cancers eventually become resistant to therapy.

"What is even more exciting," Leisner adds, "is that it works in completely different types of cancer cells. We successfully replicated the neuroblastoma findings in triple-negative breast cancer cells, meaning that new drugs targeted to CIB1 might work very broadly."


'/>"/>
Contact: Ellen de Graffenreid
edegraff@med.unc.edu
919-962-3405
University of North Carolina Health Care
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Higher-spending hospitals have fewer deaths for emergency patients
2. Reported Decline in U.S. Pneumonia Deaths May Be False: Study
3. Cancer Diagnosis May Raise Odds for Suicide, Heart Attack Death
4. Death From Accidental Injuries Among Kids Drops 30%: CDC
5. Opioids associated with highest risk of death
6. Study reveals major funding shortfall and high death rates for emergency laparotomy
7. Exercise helps smokers to quit smoking, to remain smoke-free and to reduce the risk of death
8. Additional blood pressure screening may reduce incidence of CVD events and death by up to 3 percent
9. Groundbreaking Nigeria summit results in major commitment to reduce child deaths
10. Measles Deaths Falling Worldwide
11. On-the-job deaths steady in Michigan; Number of burn injuries underreported
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... An ... bolstered by inspiring human-interest stories, courtesy of awareness-driven celebrities and thought leaders. It ... leading advocates, associations and industry leaders such as Bioness. , As patients ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... , ... May 27, 2016 , ... Aimed at nurses ... interest stories, which come courtesy of leaders in the nursing and health care industry. ... leading advocates and associations—namely Abilene Christian University. , As the nursing industry is ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... There are many ways to cook a ... (NHDSC) suggests that Americans prefer their dogs straight off the grill. Of the 90 ... their favorite way to cook a hot dog, far outpacing other cooking methods such ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Georgia State University College of ... programs. , Answering to the increasing demand for curricular specializations, the Certificate in ... environmental and land use law. ,  , “The demand for lawyers with specific ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... PA (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... and one that has a significant negative impact on long-term patient survival, reports ... date. The results, published online this week in the Journal of Thoracic and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... May 24, 2016 Niederländische ... gebracht, die es Ärzten erlaubt, ihre Expertise weltweit ... MDLinking kombiniert Live Streaming mit einer Instant-Messaging-Funktion und ... kommunizieren. Mediziner in Europa, Afrika, Asien und den ... für die Plattform registriert. Information und ...
(Date:5/24/2016)...   , Study met both ... in , Excellent plus Good ... of the ascending colon   ,      ... announced new positive data from the phase III MORA study for ... litre PEG with ascorbate. The study met both primary endpoints showing ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... 2016  NxStage Medical, Inc. (Nasdaq: NXTM ... renal care, today announced that Jeffrey H. Burbank ... following schedule of investor conferences. Where applicable, a webcast ... http://ir.nxstage.com/ .   ... NY           Friday, June 10, 2016 1:30 p.m. ET ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: