Navigation Links
Celecoxib may be effective in preventing non-melanoma skin cancers

Celecoxib may help prevent nonmelanoma skin cancers in patients with extensive actinic keratosis, which is often a precursor to these cancers, according to a randomized clinical trial published online November 29 in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Nonmelanoma skin cancersincluding cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and basal cell carcinomas (BCCs)are among the most common cancers in the United States. The incidence of these malignancies is rising and is beginning to occur more frequently in young adults. Exposure to UV radiation is believed to be one of the main causes. Existing methods of protecting against UV light, namely sunscreens, have only been modestly effective at reducing these cancers' incidence, so researchers have begun looking for other ways to prevent them. Celecoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase 2, believed to be involved in the development of UV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancers.

To determine whether celecoxib reduces the incidence of new actinic keratosis, Craig A. Elmets, M.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues, conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial with 240 people with actinic keratoses, or precancerous skin lesions. They looked at the number of new lesions after 3, 6, and 9 months of therapy and at 2 months following the completion of therapy.

The researchers found that the number of new precancerous lesions in the group of people taking celecoxib and those taking the placebo was the same. However, by the end of the trial, those taking celecoxib had a statistically significant fewer number of nonmelanoma skin cancers compared with those in the placebo group.

The researchers write, "The findings of this study, which showed that the celecoxib-treated individuals developed fewer nonmelanoma skin cancers than placebo-treated individuals, suggest that cyclooxygenase inhibitors may provide an additional benefit to sunscreens in the prevention of nonmelanoma skin cancers."

The finding that celecoxib did not reduce the number of precancerous lesions was inconsistent with animal studies showing that celecoxib reduced both precancerous lesions and nonmelanoma skin cancers. However, the drug's efficacy against later stages of tumor development was consistent with findings of trials of celecoxib for colorectal adenoma.

The FDA terminated the study early, after preliminary findings from a concurrent trial of another cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor showing an increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events. The fact that no adverse cardiovascular events were found with this trial could be because the study participants were only taking it for 9 months, the researchers point out. Another trial showed that adverse events occurring only after 1 year of rofecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

In an accompanying editorial, Frank L. Meyskens Jr. M.D., and Christine E. McLaren, Ph.D., of the University of California, Irvine write that the fact that celecoxib was effective in reducing the number of nonmelanoma skin cancers but not the number of precancerous lesions may suggest that pathways of carcinogenesis differ between early- and late-stage tumor development.

The editorialists say future trials of celecoxib might try lowering the frequency of celecoxib administration, given the adverse cardiovascular events shown by other trials, or use a lower dosage in combination with other compounds with proven efficacy in colorectal adenoma.


Contact: Kristine Crane
Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Related medicine news :

1. Sporadic breast cancers start with ineffective DNA repair systems, Pitt researchers find
2. Hemostatic drug less effective than originally predicted
3. New Malaria Drug Proves Effective in Study of African Children
4. 5-year results show keyhole bowel cancer surgery is safe and effective
5. New lymphoma therapy may be more effective with fewer side effects
6. Diverse surgeons initiative effectively increases underrepresented minorities in academic surgery
7. Gene Mutations May Blunt Plavixs Effectiveness, Study Finds
8. Newer, more intense chemotherapy with less radiation not more effective against Hodgkins lymphoma
9. Parent-only treatment may be equally effective for children who are obese
10. Home Monitoring of Blood-Thinner Use Appears Effective
11. Conventional, annual Pap smear cost-effective follow-up after cervical lesion treatment
Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... "FCPX editors can now ... of Final Cut Pro X," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. ... Final Cut Pro X users can now reveal the media of their split ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... 27, 2016 , ... A revolution is underway. Brooklyn-based ... experience for the millions of people who require these medical transport services annually. ... through the use of technology. Now, SmartEMS has put forth an industry-changing app ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... , ... June 26, 2016 , ... On June 10-11, ... of the 2016 Cereal Festival and World’s Longest Breakfast Table in Battle Creek, MI, ... the city’s history as home to some of the world’s leading providers of cereal ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... Brent Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer ... through a fitness app. The fitness app plans to fix the two major problems leading ... a one size fits all type program , They don’t eliminate all the ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... , ... Austin residents seeking Mohs surgery services, can now turn to Dr. ... Russell Peckham for medical and surgical dermatology. , Dr. Dorsey brings specialization to include ... in Mohs Micrographic Surgery completed by Dr. Dorsey was under the direction of Glenn ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... Mass. , June 24, 2016   Pulmatrix, ... pharmaceutical company developing innovative inhaled drugs, announced today that ... Russell Investments reconstituted its comprehensive set of ... "This is an important milestone for Pulmatrix," ... will increase shareholder awareness of our progress in developing ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Calif. , June 23, 2016 Any dentist ... many challenges of the current process. Many of them do ... of the technical difficulties and high laboratory costs involved. And ... to offer it at such a high cost that the ... it. Dr. Parsa Zadeh , founder of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ANGELES , June 23, 2016 ... CAPR ), a biotechnology company focused ... therapeutics, today announced that patient enrollment in its ... in Duchenne) has exceeded 50% of its 24-patient ... enrollment in the third quarter of 2016, and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: