Navigation Links
Carnegie Mellon researchers uncover how the brain processes faces
Date:5/31/2011

Each time you see a person that you know, your brain rapidly and seemingly effortlessly recognizes that person by his or her face.

Until now, scientists believed that only a couple of brain areas mediate facial recognition. However, Carnegie Mellon University's Marlene Behrmann, David Plaut and Adrian Nestor have discovered that an entire network of cortical areas work together to identify faces. Published in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), their findings will change the future of neural visual perception research and allow scientists to use this discovery to develop targeted remedies for disorders such as face blindness.

"This research will change the types of questions asked going forward because we are not just looking at one area of the brain," said Nestor, a postdoctoral research fellow within CMU's Department of Psychology and lead author of the study. "Now, scientists will have to account for the system as a whole or else our ability to understand face individuation will be limited."

Behrmann, professor of psychology and a renowned expert in using brain imaging to study prosopagnosia, or face blindness, agreed.

"Faces are among the most compelling visual stimulation that we encounter, and recognizing faces taxes our visual perception system to the hilt. Carnegie Mellon has a longstanding history for embracing a full-system account of the brain. We have the computational tools and technology to push further into looking past one single brain region. And, that is what we did here to discover that there are multiple cortical areas working together to recognize faces," she said.

For the study, participants were shown images of faces while in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Their task was to recognize different facial identities with varying facial expressions. Using dynamic multivariate mapping, the research team examined the functional MRI (fMRI) data and found a network of fusiform and anterior temporal regions that respond with distinct patterns to different identities. Furthermore, they found that the information is evenly distributed among the anterior regions and that the right fusiform region plays a central role within the network.

"Not only do we have a more clearly defined architectural model of the brain, but we were able to determine the involvement of multiple brain areas in face recognition as well as in other types of processes, such as visual word recognition," Behrmann said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Shilo Raube
sraube@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Carnegie Mellon will test ability of embedded sensors to detect onset of dementia, infirmity
2. Carnegie Mellon research provides insight into brains decision-making process
3. Carnegie Mellon to host workshop about basics of technology entrepreneurship
4. Carnegie Mellon to host crisis management workshop
5. Carnegie Mellons Steinbrenner Institute helps grow green jobs
6. Researchers map all the fragile sites of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiaes genome
7. UH Case Medical Center researchers publish promising findings for advanced cervical cancer
8. Researchers discover new way to kill pediatric brain tumors
9. Researchers Who Discovered First Genes for Stuttering will Present Findings to the National Stuttering Association
10. Researchers create drug to keep tumor growth switched off
11. Urine protein test might help diagnose kidney damage from lupus, UT Southwestern researchers find
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Carnegie Mellon researchers uncover how the brain processes faces
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... MedTech For Solutions has ... ART laboratory, to provide hands-on training utilizing cutting-edge equipment at its recently-opened OvaTools ... MedTech Group Purchasing vendor , will provide specialized equipment to ensure OvaTools ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... Orbita’s Nathan Treloar will discuss ... 2017 in San Francisco. Titled Connected Health and IoT: Technology Innovators and Disruption ... hosted by Parks Associates, a market research and consulting firm specializing in emerging consumer ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... San Francisco, California (PRWEB) , ... May 23, 2017 , ... ... released results of its new survey in an infographic on the current state of ... 900 U.S. respondents, familiar with anxiety, was conducted in April 2017 and benchmarked general ...
(Date:5/22/2017)... Mt. Kisco, NY (PRWEB) , ... May 22, 2017 , ... ... are urged to receive relaxing sedation dentistry in Mt. Kisco, NY from Advanced ... can be administered for a variety of treatments. One or more sedation methods may ...
(Date:5/22/2017)... ... May 22, 2017 , ... An inventor from Columbia, S.C., wants to offer ... hand was damaged in a firework accident, so she couldn’t grip a pen properly," ... , He then designed and created a prototype for the HELPEN HAND, a special ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/4/2017)... , May 4, 2017  A recent study ... Ultraviolet-C light as a means of ... ability to reduce bioburden on anesthesia workstations. In ... on high-touch, complex medical equipment surfaces contaminated with ... "This study further validates the body ...
(Date:5/4/2017)... -- DarioHealth Corp. (NASDAQ: DRIO), a leading global digital health ... announced that it is teaming up with Auto Control ... lower diabetes healthcare costs in Canada ... available throughout all provinces and territories in ... additional savings when shopping for Dario supplies in local ...
(Date:5/3/2017)... ORANGE COUNTY, Calif. , May 3, 2017 ... vital aspect of any hospital or healthcare facility. ... of examination room is equipped with diagnostic imaging ... and arteries of the heart. In these spaces, ... coronary angiography, catheterization, balloon angioplasty, percutaneous coronary intervention, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: