Navigation Links
Carnegie Mellon researchers improve assessments of aortic aneurysms
Date:6/12/2008

PITTSBURGHCarnegie Mellon University's Ender Finol has received a two-year, $602,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop methodologies for accurately evaluating the risk of aneurysms rupturing in the human body's main artery, which carries more than 5,000 quarts of blood daily through the human body.

Like a great city, the body needs a transport system to carry its vital cargoes of blood through more than 60,000 miles of arteries, veins and capillaries. But more than 5 percent of Americans suffer from aortic aneurysms and their sudden rupture can halt the flow of life-sustaining, oxygen-laden blood to the vital areas of the body. The rupture of such aneurysms is associated with a mortality rate of up to 80 percent, and more than 15,000 Americans die each year from a ruptured aortic aneurysm.

"What we are trying to do is create a simple tool that helps predict when these ruptures will occur and give physicians a more scientific understanding of the relationship between blood flow and vascular disease," said Finol, an associate research professor and head of the Vascular Biomechanics and Biofluids Laboratory at Carnegie Mellon's Institute for Complex Engineered Systems (ICES).

Finol said his research team is working to develop a computational system that will help surgeons better understand how changes in the shape and the thickness of the arterial wall can signal the exact moment a rupture may ensue.

Satish Muluk, director of Vascular Surgery at Pittsburgh's Allegheny General Hospital, said the Carnegie Mellon research will give physicians a more sophisticated way of predicting when ruptures will occur. "If we can learn early on about high-stresses in the arterial wall, and how such stress is associated with the remodeling of the aneurysm over time, we have a better chance of focusing in on patients with the highest risk of rupture," Muluk said.

Although men ages 55 and older are at greatest risk for such aneurysms, Muluk said women also face great risk because their blood vessels are smaller, often making them prime targets for premature ruptures.

"We are also looking at the characteristics of the tissue that makes up the arterial wall to determine the effect of this material in the eventual rupture of aneurysms," said Finol, who recently co-authored papers on aneurysm modeling in the journals Computers and Structures, and Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering.

Gary K. Fedder, ICES director and professor of electrical and computer engineering and robotics at Carnegie Mellon, said Finol's research continues to extend the reach of ICES and its biomedical footprint.


'/>"/>

Contact: Chriss Swaney
swaney@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-5776
Carnegie Mellon University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Carnegie Mellon brain imaging study illustrates how remedial instruction helps poor readers
2. 2008 Gruber Genetics Prize awarded to Allan Spradling of Carnegie Institution
3. Establishing a Price for Carbon Emissions in the U.S. Would Spur Immediate Reductions in Energy Consumption and More Efficient Use of Power Generators, Study by Carnegie Mellon Researchers Shows
4. Carnegie Mellon engineering researchers automate analysis of protein patterns
5. Carnegie Mellon technique accelerates biological image analysis
6. Teams From Carnegie Mellon, Yale, Manitoba Win Tepper Schools 2008 McGinnis Venture Competition
7. Carnegie Mellons Tepper School of Business to Host 2008 Cornerstones Symposium on Building City of the Future, March 25
8. ANSYS Sponsors Dinosaurs Exhibit at Carnegie Museum of Natural History
9. Carnegie Mellon study shows just listening to cell phones significantly impairs drivers
10. NSF awards Carnegie Mellons Jacobo Bielak
11. Carnegie Mellon study identifies where thoughts of familiar objects occur inside the human brain
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... The American Board of Family Medicine's (ABFM) Board ... Chief Executive Officer, succeeding Dr. James C. Puffer upon his retirement. Dr. Newton will ... Dr. Puffer’s retirement at the end of 2018. Upon assuming the role of President ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Apple Rehab Shelton Lakes , which specializes ... of the facility as part of a disaster drill on October 3rd. , Apple ... Shelton City Emergency Manager, as well as the Connecticut Long Term Care Mutual ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House ... most popular and least understood books in the Holy Scriptures, Revelation. The Book of ... baffled scholars for centuries. Many have tossed it off as mere rubbish, but Yisrayl ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range of technology and learning ... Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held October 14–18, 2017 at ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... Bethesda, MD (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... Award of Excellence to Carol Friedman, PhD, FACMI, during the Opening Session of AMIA’s ... 4 – 8. , In honor of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... 10, 2017   West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc. ... injectable drug administration, today shared the results of a ... improving the intradermal administration of polio vaccines. The study ... in May 2017 by Dr. Ondrej Mach , ... Health Organization (WHO), and recently published in the journal ...
(Date:10/5/2017)... , Oct. 5, 2017  In response to ... Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) released prescribing recommendations ... to be used as a first-line therapy to ... Recognizing the value ... White Paper "Opioid Prescribing: Acute and Postoperative Pain ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... -- According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), influenza ... Care is helping communities across Massachusetts , ... no-cost* flu shots through the end of the month. *Some ... ... flu shot is by the end of October, according to the Centers ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: