Navigation Links
Cardiovascular diseases rise during Greek financial crisis
Date:5/17/2014

Athens, 18 May 2014: Hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases increased during the Greek financial crisis, according to two studies from Athens. The research was presented today at the Heart Failure Congress 2014, held 17-20 May in Athens, Greece. The Congress is the main annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

Dr Alexios Samentzas said: "Greece plunged into an economic crisis in 2008 and since then there have been rises in unemployment, wage reductions and a fall in standard of living. Previous studies have shown that cardiovascular disease is more frequent during crises such as wars and natural disasters."

Dr Dimitra Papadimitriou said: "We noticed an increased incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart attack in younger patients in the emergency room during the Greek financial crisis. Therefore, we decided to investigate whether there had been a real increase in cardiovascular diseases during the crisis."

The researchers retrospectively analysed all admissions to the cardiology department of Elpis General Hospital in Athens during two time periods. The first time period, 2003 to 2007, was defined as the pre-crisis period, while 2008 to 2012 was the crisis period.

Dr Samentzas said: "We chose 2008 as the start of the crisis because gross national product (GNP) markedly reduced that year. GNP is still at a lower level than it was prior to 2008 and unemployment has steadily gone up."

The researchers recorded admissions for heart attacks (also referred to as acute myocardial infarction) and AF, the commonest heart rhythm disorder. They examined the results in younger patients and those without social insurance, and looked to see if there were differences between men and women.

The cardiology department received 3 420 admissions during the pre-crisis period and 3 860 during the crisis period. During the crisis period the number of admissions for heart attacks rose in both sexes but the finding was only statistically significant in women. Admissions also increased in people under the age of 45 years, but again the result was only statistically significant in women.

Dr Papadimitriou, first author of the heart attack study, said: "Younger women are thought to be protected against heart disease because oestrogens have a favourable effect in the cardiovascular system. During menopause, women's ischemic heart disease risk equals men's their age due to an oestrogen deficit."

She continued: "During the financial crisis, women's natural protection against heart disease may have been cancelled because of stress, which is an important factor in the development of heart attacks. This could explain the greater number of admissions for heart attacks in women when the crisis occurred."

AF admissions increased significantly in both sexes during the crisis, with an even greater rise in women. The climb in admissions was also seen in patients under 60 years old, with men being more susceptible.

Dr Samentzas, who led the AF study, said: "Previous studies have shown links between depression, anxiety, stress and AF. It is likely that Greek people have become more stressed during the crisis as they have lost their jobs or had their salary decreased. The lack of money and decrease in quality of life may have led to happiness, self-esteem and satisfaction being replaced with distress, disappointment and anger. These negative emotions may have increased stress levels further and contributed to the rise in AF."

Admissions for AF doubled in patients (particularly women) with no social insurance while heart attack admissions increased in men and women without insurance, but the increase was statistically significant only in men. Dr Papadimitriou said: "We think there were more patients without social insurance during the crisis which is why there were more admissions. Unemployed people are less likely to pay for insurance."

She continued: "Our results highlight the importance of cardiovascular prevention during times of social distress. People with a lower quality of life due to the financial crisis tend to follow an unhealthy diet, have sedentary lifestyles and start or continue smoking as an escape from their problems."

Dr Samentzas concluded: "The upsurge in heart attacks and AF during the crisis are a wake-up call for doctors and health systems to advise patients how to live healthily and reduce their cardiovascular risk."


'/>"/>

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
33-622-834-576
European Society of Cardiology
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Original research papers on acute cardiovascular care: ESC launches EHJ-ACVC
2. Is it time for regional cardiovascular emergency care systems across the US?
3. New guidelines deliver concise messages for implementing cardiovascular prevention
4. Meditation practice may decrease risk for cardiovascular disease in teens
5. Meditation practice may decrease risk for cardiovascular disease in teens
6. Exercise program improved health of lung transplant patients and cut cardiovascular risk
7. Low steroid levels linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease
8. Prostate cancer treatment regret is 52 percent higher in men with cardiovascular disease
9. Prevention is better than cure for killer cardiovascular disease
10. Increased cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients may relate to arterial inflammation
11. NIH launches trial to evaluate anti-inflammatory treatment for preventing heart attacks, strokes, and cardiovascular deaths
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... New York, NY (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... most influential people in business to advocate for action towards gender equality at their ... 18,000 views from around the globe, and reached a social audience of over 3 ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House of Yahweh, has released ... understood books in the Holy Scriptures, Revelation. The Book of Revelation paints a picture ... Many have tossed it off as mere rubbish, but Yisrayl Hawkins says that is ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Coveros, a leader in agile ... a contract by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The Enterprise ... use of Agile methodologies in a consistent and high value manner across CMS ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... , ... “America On The Brink”: the Christian history of the United States ... creation of published author, William Nowers. Captain Nowers and his wife, Millie, have ... thirty years in the Navy. Following his career as a naval aviator and ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... are now treating sleep apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As ... serious sleep disorder characterized by frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can offer ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/4/2017)... , Oct. 4, 2017  According to the Centers for Disease Control ... of October . PhysicianOne Urgent Care is helping communities across ... NY , by offering no-cost* flu shots through the end of ... by certain health insurance regulations. ... best time to get a flu shot is by the end of ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... Oct. 2, 2017  AllianceRx Walgreens Prime, the combined ... Walgreens and pharmacy benefit manager Prime Therapeutics LLC (Prime), ... which included the unveiling of new signage at its ... well as at a few other company-owned facilities across ... to patients, some of whom will begin to see ...
(Date:9/28/2017)... Cohen Veterans Bioscience and Early Signal Foundation ... and home sensors for real-time monitoring of patients with ... nonprofit organization focused on disruptive health solutions for rare ... system to record and integrate behavioral, cognitive, physiological and ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: