Navigation Links
Cardiovascular Institute: Unfolded protein response contributes to sudden death in heart failure

PROVIDENCE, R.I. A researcher at the Cardiovascular Institute (CVI) at Rhode Island, The Miriam and Newport hospitals has found a link to human heart failure that if blocked, may reduce the risk of sudden cardiac death. The paper, written by Samuel C. Dudley, M.D., Ph.D., chief of cardiology at the CVI, is published in the journal Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology.

Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unexpected death caused by loss of heart function, or sudden cardiac arrest. It is the most common cause of natural death in the U.S., resulting in approximately 325,000 adult deaths in the U.S. each year.

The study found that the unfolded protein response (UPR), a condition usually associated with viral infections, diabetes and obesity, is activated in human heart failure and can increase the risk of sudden cardiac death. The UPR Is a cell defense system designed to shut down protein synthesis and respond when the cell makes defective or foreign proteins. This prevents cell death as a result of accumulation of a large number of defective or unwanted proteins. Previously, it was unknown that the UPR is also active in heart failure and may explain the loss of many useful proteins in this condition.

"Half of all patients who suffer from abnormal heart beats will die from heart failure," said Dudley, the study's principal investigator. "While we still don't know exactly what causes this electrical instability in the heart, we do know that it leads to abnormal heart beats and can increase the risk of sudden cardiac death."

Dudley continued, "This is the first time that the unfolded protein response has been implicated in sudden cardiac death. Therefore, if we can find a way to block the unfolded protein response, we are one step closer to finding a treatment to significantly reduce the risk of sudden cardiac death."

Sudden cardiac arrest, which can lead to SCD, is often confused with heart attack. Heart attacks occur when there is a blockage in one or more of the arteries to the heart, preventing the heart from receiving blood. Whereas sudden cardiac arrest occurs when the electrical system to the heart malfunctions and the heart beat suddenly becomes very irregular, and very fast, preventing blood from flowing to the brain and elsewhere in the body. This often results in a loss of consciousness, and eventually death if not treated quickly.


Contact: Ellen Slingsby

Related medicine news :

1. Edoxaban effective in preventing stroke, reducing bleeding and cardiovascular death in patients with atrial fibrillation
2. Data show drug being tested to reduce cardiovascular events increased risk of heart attack
3. A Best Manuscript Award Goes to the Cardiovascular Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
4. Northern California Medical Associates (NCMA) Welcomes Jaime Molden, M.D. Cardiac Electrophysiologist to the NCMA Cardiovascular Services Team
5. RI Cardiovascular Institute to present 20+ abstracts at AHA annual Scientific Sessions
6. Researchers discover that the body clock may influence morning peak in adverse cardiovascular events
7. BCC Research Publishes a New Report On Global Markets for Cardiovascular Surgical Devices
8. Study finds testosterone therapy may reduce risk of cardiovascular disease
9. AGH Cardiovascular Team Explores Implantable Device Designed to Treat Congestive Heart Failure
10. Study strengthens link between low dietary fiber intake and increased cardiovascular risk
11. Global Cardiovascular Device Companies Surveying Market: Worldwide Industry Latest Market Share, Growth, Size,Trends, Strategy And Forecast Research Report
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... ... “While riding the bus, I saw a passenger in a wheelchair drenched from ... a convenient and comfortable way to protect them from bad weather, so I invented ... during cold or inclement weather. In doing so, it ensures that the user remains ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... (PHA) announces the nation’s Periwinkle Pioneers, individuals and groups responsible for advancing care ... disease. The Periwinkle Pioneers, nominated by the public, will receive special recognition throughout ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... An unlikely combination ... in a way for homeless people to have a more dignified and comfortable ... initiative whereby they are repurposing plastic bags into sleeping mats for the homeless. ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... focused on providing comprehensive solutions involving adult stem cell therapies to patients with ... deemed the “Regenestem” name as a Registered Trademark (RTM). , Organizations are required ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Genesis Chiropractic Software helps practice owners automate ... between the practice owner and the patient that automatically manages all five aspects ... Click here to learn more. , According to Dr. Brian ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... , November 25, 2015 Kitov ... ) (TASE: KTOV), a biopharmaceutical company focused on the ... various clinical conditions, today announced the closing of its ... Shares ( ADSs ), each representing 20 ordinary shares ... 3,158,900 ADSs. The ADSs and warrants were issued in ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , Nov. 25, 2015 Allergan ... pharmaceutical company, and Rugen Therapeutics, a start-up  biotechnology ... for unmet CNS disorders and funded by the ... they have entered into an exclusive collaboration to ... for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Obsessive Compulsive ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... Israel , November 25, 2015 ... "New Investors"), pursuant to which BioLight and the New ... IOPtima Ltd. subsidiary ("IOPtima") via a private placement. The ... of its innovative IOPtimate™ system used in the treatment ... approval pathway process for the IOPtimate™ system with the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: