Navigation Links
Carbon Monoxide May Help Bypass Surgery Patients
Date:5/23/2008

Low doses of gas found in car exhaust provides anti-inflammatory effects in lungs

FRIDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Low doses of carbon monoxide (CO) -- the potentially lethal gas in car exhaust fumes -- may help protect the lungs of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery, German researchers say.

The team gave low doses of CO to pigs that underwent beating-heart CPB.

"Our findings support that inhaled CO provides anti-inflammatory effects in the lungs and decreases the instance of cell death during CPB," study author Dr. Torsten Loop, of the anesthesiology department at the University Medical Centre Freiburg, said in a prepared statement.

"Additionally, and of greater importance, these effects occurred when CO was administered as a pre-treatment -- with the advantage of short exposure time, which limits how avidly CO can bind to hemoglobin," Loop said.

This is important, because the poisonous effects of CO occur when it's allowed to freely bind to hemoglobin within red blood cells.

The study was published in the May issue of Anesthesiology.

"Cardiac surgery is one of the most extreme situations a patient can face," Loop noted. "Although a heart-lung machine ensures that organs are supplied with blood, and therefore oxygen, the nature of heart surgery means that normal operation of the lungs is impaired -- potentially resulting in lung injury."

Only about 2 percent of cardiac surgery patients suffer life-threatening lung injuries, but death rates for these patients can exceed 60 percent. This finding suggests CO could prove useful in reducing lung inflammation and cell death during CPB.

"A fascinating aspect of this study is that pre-treatment with CO before CPB was effective in protecting the lungs. These findings may support evidence that CO can trigger the body into a state that helps to protect it against the sometimes damaging effects of CPB," Dr. John G. Laffey, of the Clinical Sciences Institute at the National University of Ireland, wrote in an accompanying editorial.

The study results lend support to the feasibility of conducting human studies to examine the potential protective effects of CO on a number of organs.

"The demonstration that CO may reduce pulmonary inflammation and injury following CPB is an important and novel finding. Relative ease of administration, probable safety when given at low doses for short periods, and likely protective effects for multiple organs make this a fascinating agent with clear therapeutic promise," Laffey noted.

More information

The MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia has more about heart bypass surgery.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Society of Anesthesiologists, news release, May 23, 2008


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Carbon nanotubes that look like asbestos, behave like asbestos
2. Carbon Nanotubes That Look Like Asbestos, Behave Like Asbestos
3. ESA contributes to ocean carbon cycle research
4. MarketResearch.com Announces Distribution of CarbonFree Research
5. Reducing carbon emissions could help -- not harm -- US economy
6. Tracking your carbon footprint
7. Wiley-Blackwell renews carbon neutral commitment
8. Routine screenings uncover hidden carbon monoxide poisoning
9. UT Southwestern plastic surgeons deploy new carbon dioxide-based fractional laser
10. Hot liquids release potentially harmful chemicals in polycarbonate plastic bottles
11. Activists Raise Alarm for Seniors, Deliver Carbon Monoxide Detectors to Atria Marland Place
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/16/2017)... GA (PRWEB) , ... January 16, 2017 , ... ... to announce their recent partnership with an innovator in the wheelchair accessibility industry, ... to motivate their dealer salespeople to sell wheelchair accessible vehicles. With this new ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... ... ... One thing common to all types of cancer is that it’s a ... money spent screening for and treating cancer in the United States is estimated to ... than in any other country that has an advanced healthcare system, sometimes spending as ...
(Date:1/15/2017)... ... January 15, 2017 , ... Going above and ... that strives to better communities around the world by offering the Gensuite team ... the opportunity for team members to become involved in a cause that is ...
(Date:1/15/2017)... ... 14, 2017 , ... Wondering where to go this Valentine's Day? Well, there ... for a romantic, lobster feast in the comfort of your own home. Lobster Gram ... dinners will be featured until February 15th, 2017. , Romantic Dinner one is ...
(Date:1/14/2017)... ... January 14, 2017 , ... AgileMinder develops innovative products and services ... Scale is now available on Apple as a fun, free emoji sticker pack for ... one of the ten color coded values on The Emoji Scale. , On ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/16/2017)... and PUNE, India , January ... by Allied Market Research, titled, "Vital Signs Monitoring Devices Market ... Forecast, 2014-2022", projects that the global vital signs monitoring devices ... expected to reach $5,491 million by 2022, growing at a ... America was the leading regional market in global ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... Oregon and PUNE, India , January 16, 2017 ... Research, titled, "Antioxidants Market by Type - Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, ... is expected to reach $4,531 million by 2022, registering a CAGR of 6.42% ... for more than one-third share of the global volume in 2015. ... ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... 16, 2017  Dovetail Genomics today announced the commercial ... service, which yields chromosome-scale genome assemblies. The service is ... workshop on Jan. 17 at the Plant & Animal ... . "We are thrilled to be ... our Dovetail Hi-C offering," said Todd Dickinson , ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: