Navigation Links
Car Ignition 'Interlocks' Thwart Alcohol-Impaired Drivers
Date:2/22/2011

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Ignition devices that prevent people from driving after drinking greatly reduce the number of new arrests of drivers who were previously arrested for drunk driving, U.S. researchers report.

The team with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Community Guide branch reviewed 15 studies on ignition interlocks, devices that prevent someone from operating a vehicle if their blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is above a specified level, usually 0.02 to 0.04 grams per deciliter. The minimum illegal BAC is 0.08 g/dL in every state.

Ignition interlocks work by sampling a driver's breath before the vehicle can be started and periodically while the vehicle is being driven. The devices are often mandated for people who have been convicted of drunk driving, the CDC said.

The researchers' review found that the use of ignition interlocks led to a 67 percent decrease in the number of drivers who were re-arrested for drunk driving, compared to those whose licenses were simply suspended.

The findings appear in the March issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

"When offenders' licenses are suspended, they aren't legally able to provide transportation for themselves and others who may rely on them to get to places like school and work," study author Randy Elder, scientific director of systematic reviews with the Community Guide branch, said in a CDC news release. "Ignition interlocks allow offenders to keep operating their vehicles legally. At the same time, they effectively ensure that they do so more safely -- not under the dangerous effects of alcohol."

Currently, 13 states require ignition interlocks for all people convicted of drunk driving, including first offenders. More than half of states require interlocks for some offenders, such as those with multiple drunk driving convictions or those who had an extremely high blood alcohol level at the time of arrest, the CDC said.

Even so, only a small proportion of convicted drunk drivers participate in interlock programs, said the study authors.

"Each day, more than 30 people die because of alcohol-impaired driving. We know that interlock devices can save lives. More widespread use of ignition interlocks will reduce alcohol-related crash deaths and injuries," CDC Director Dr. Thomas R. Frieden said in the news release.

In 2009, impaired driving-related crashes caused nearly 11,000 deaths in the United States -- nearly one-third of all traffic deaths. The annual cost of impaired driving in the United States is more than $110 billion, the CDC said.

More information

The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has more on impaired driving.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Feb. 22, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Nanoscale gene ignition switch may help spot and treat cancer
2. Surgery Alone May Thwart Stage 1 Lung Cancer
3. Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
4. Treating Gum Disease May Thwart Preterm Births
5. Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
6. Ebola Virus Thwarted After Exposure
7. Could Drinking Help Thwart Rheumatoid Arthritis?
8. Phase I trial indicates ponatinib may thwart most resistant CML
9. Study details how protein made by HPV teams up on and thwarts protective human protein
10. Animal Study Finds Nerve Stimulation May Thwart Tinnitus
11. Rate Regulation for Health Insurance: Obama Administration Should Look to CAs Model Law Which Has Saved Drivers $62 Billion Since 1988
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... May 04, 2016 , ... ... 2016, a powerful cellular therapy software application that helps blood and marrow transplant ... , Since Transtem’s initial launch, Mediware has continued to enhance core application features. ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... May 04, 2016 , ... International Conference on Obesity and ... 2016 at Las Vegas. It aims to bring together academicians, scientists, dietitians, surgeons, ... organizations across the globe; making the conference a perfect platform to share experience ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... May 04, 2016 , ... The National Association of Professional Women (NAPW) ... of the Year Circle. She is recognized with this prestigious distinction for leadership in ... than 850,000 members and over 200 operating Local Chapters. , “I’m pleased to welcome ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... , ... Sue Desmond-Hellmann, chief executive officer of the Bill & Melinda Gates ... possibility in her keynote address at Georgia State University’s spring commencement on ... rich experience as a scientist, physician and executive, Desmond-Hellmann leads the Gates Foundation’s efforts ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... Baltimore, Md. (PRWEB) , ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... devastating consequences of inappropriate or excessive levels of alcohol use. Alcohol and its ... fetal alcohol spectrum disorders to the susceptibility to strokes in those 65 years and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... OSWEGO, Ore. , May 3, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... endovascular medical technology, today announced Food and Drug ... cardiac resynchronization defibrillator that provides heart failure patients ... scans. Iperia devices also have remote monitoring with ... that adapts the heart rate in response to ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... , May 3, 2016   BIOTRONIK ... of extending care beyond the implant at the Heart ... 4-7 in San Francisco . ... delivering the highest quality of patient care and satisfaction ... cared for each and every tomorrow," said Marlou ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... 2016 Pharmaceutical giant Johnson & ... a woman who says its talc-based powder products caused ... Ristesund $5 million in compensatory damages and $50 ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160330/349511LOGO ) , This is the ... In February, the same court awarded $72 million to ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: