Navigation Links
Cancer trial information leaflets 'not fit for purpose'- new study

Patient information leaflets for cancer trials are not up to the job, reveals a new study from the University of Leicester.

Research published in the international journal Sociology of Health and Illness reveals that patients find the leaflets far too long and incomprehensible, and even intimidating.

"These information sheets are poorly aligned with patients' information needs and how they really make decisions about whether to join a cancer trial," said author Professor Mary Dixon-Woods, Professor of Medical Sociology at the University of Leicester Department of Health Sciences.

"Some patients did find them very useful, but many others paid them little attention. They preferred to rely on discussions they had with their doctor to make up their minds."

The study aimed to unravel the mystery of why cancer trial information sheets are so hard to get right. Conducted as a collaboration between the Departments of Health Sciences and Cancer Studies at the University of Leicester, it traced what happened in 13 cancer trials. It looked at information sheets from the time they were prepared by the researchers leading the trials, through being reviewed and approved by research ethics committees. The study interviewed 26 patients who were approached to take part in trials and were given the information sheets.

"We found that research ethics committee examine information sheets very carefully. They are genuinely keen to make sure that patients are not misled in any way and that the information sheets are easy to read. They very often ask researchers to make changes to make sure they are suitable," said author Dr Natalie Armstrong, Lecturer in Social Science Applied to Health.

"The problem is that information sheets are trying to do too many things. They end up having many of the features of a legal contract. Patients often find them far too long and incomprehensible, and even intimidating. In fact, many patients believed that the information sheets weren't really produced for their benefit at all, but were more about researchers and institutions 'covering their backs'".

One patient in the study said: "There was a lot of jargon that didn't really necessarily need to be in there. I think that there was a lot of information that sort of baffled you."

There are things that could be done to improve cancer trial information sheets, the study concludes.

"Rather than using standardised templates, it might be better to have a list of principles that could be used when writing information sheets. It could also be valuable to involve patients themselves in helping to write and review them," commented Dr Armstrong. "But we also have to accept that patients may continue to make their decisions about taking part in trials based on trust in their doctor, no matter how well written the information sheets are. We need to find ways to support doctors when recruiting to trials."

Contact: Professor Mary Dixon-Woods
University of Leicester

Related medicine news :

1. Cancer treatment system sculpts radiation beam to match shape of a tumor
2. Few young women with cancer take steps to preserve fertility during treatments
3. Non-drug treatments help alleviate symptoms of treatment-induced menopause in breast cancer patients
4. Stress management for breast cancer patients may affect disease course
5. Nemours researchers uncover new evidence of cancer-causing agent present in gaseous phase of cigarette smoke
6. Obscurins in breast tissue may help physicians predict and detect breast cancer
7. Study: Low bone density medications may have protective effect on endometrial cancer
8. Parents of children with cancer distrust and fear online sources of health information, study shows
9. ASCO honors Ching-Hon Pui, M.D., for work advancing childhood cancer research and treatment
10. Have I got cancer or havent I? Medical staff confuse women with ductal carcinoma in situ
11. Dense breasts can nearly double the risk of breast cancer recurrence
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Cancer trial information leaflets 'not fit for purpose'- new study
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Intellitec Solutions ... SL User Group (MSDSLUG). Recognized as Microsoft’s official group for end users of ... SL software users, partners, industry experts and representatives. Intellitec Solutions’ membership status demonstrates ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... The moment ... itself for not only fulfilling the needs of advisers and clients but going ... price and providing top-tier customer service. However, there's always room for improvement, which ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 2015 , ... CBD College is proud to announce that on ... accreditation to its Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. CBD College is honored to join this ... colleges and universities in the state of California make the cut. CBD College is ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... Dr. ... Medical Associates, Inc. and Dr. Tucker Bierbaum with Emergency Medicine at St., ... observed that both STEMI and Sepsis conditions present in similar ways and require time-critical ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... , ... Indosoft Inc., developer and distributor of the world-class ... (Long Term Support) into its Q-Suite 5.10 product line. , Making the change ... version of Asterisk that will receive not only security fixes, but feature and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... November 26, 2015 ... adds "Global Repaglinide Industry ... Report on China Repaglinide Market, 2010-2019" ... data and information to its online ... . --> ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , Nov. 25, 2015 ... the addition of the "Global Brain ... their offering. --> ) ... "Global Brain Monitoring Devices Market 2015-2019" ... Research and Markets ( ) has ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... WILMINGTON, N.C. , Nov. 25, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... announces the planned investment of at least $15.8 ... in Wilmington, NC . The ... services capacity to meet the growing demands of ... Wilmington site expansion will provide up ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: