Navigation Links
Cancer risk: Aspirin and smoking affect aging of genes
Date:7/1/2014

The risk of developing cancer increases with age. Factors like smoking and regular aspirin use also affect the risk of cancer although in the opposite sense. Researchers from the University of Basel were now able to show that aspirin use and smoking both influence aging processes of the female genome that are connected to colorectal cancer. The Journal of the National Cancer Institute has published their results.

Already in the 1990s, scientists discovered that regular use of aspirin over long periods of time decreases the cancer risk. Since then, numerous studies have confirmed the protective effect of the drug against different types of cancer. Regular aspirin use is said to reduce the risk to develop colorectal cancer by an average of 40%. However, it is unknown how exactly the drug influences the cancer risk.

A research group led by Prof. Primo Schr, molecular geneticists at the Department of Biomedicine from the University of Basel and gastrointestinal specialist PD Dr. Kaspar Truninger, has now discovered a possible mechanism of how aspirin decreases the risk of cancer: It slows down certain aging processes of the genome - namely modifications that also play an important role in the development of tumors.

In order to analyze the relationships between lifestyle and genome aging, the researchers examined intestinal tissue samples of 546 healthy women over 50 years of age. They compared age-specific changes of gene markers, so-called DNA methylations, with the women's lifestyle factors regarding aspirin use, smoking, body mass index and hormonal replacement therapy. The most significant effects were measured for aspirin use and smoking.

Aging Markers

"Each cell's genome resembles a library that is full of bookmarks", explains Schr. Thanks to these bookmarks, the cells know which genes to read, so that they can fulfill their specialized tasks as skin, muscle or intestinal cells. "But these markers are not very stable and change during the course of age. If, at certain parts of the genome, the change is to drastic, tumors can develop", says Schr.

In this study, the researchers were able to show for the first time that this age-related decay of gene markers can be slowed down by the regular use of aspirin. Smoking on the other hand, accelerates the aging process. "Especially affected are genes that also play a role in the development of cancer", says Dr. Faiza Noreen, research associate at the Department of Biomedicine from the University of Basel and first author of the study.

Truninger emphasizes that it would be premature to start taking aspirin solely for cancer prevention without consulting a doctor first especially when regarding the potential side effects such as gastrointestinal bleeding.


'/>"/>

Contact: Olivia Poisson
olivia.poisson@unibas.ch
University of Basel
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. EORTC presents European solution for effective cancer drug development
2. New approach identifies cancer mutations as targets of effective melanoma immunotherapy
3. Case Western Reserve, University Hospitals fundraising for adolescent, young adult cancer
4. Improved survival with TAS-102 in mets colorectal cancer refractory to standard therapies
5. Some aggressive cancers may respond to anti-inflammatory drugs
6. Colon cancer survivors are more likely to have pain in the back and abdomen
7. Genetics dominant risk factor in common cancers
8. New test predicts the risk of non-hereditary breast cancer
9. Researchers conduct comprehensive review of treatments for depression in cancer patients
10. Scientists find potential new use for cancer drug in gene therapy for blood disorders
11. A new non-invasive cancer test expands laboratory.
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Cancer risk: Aspirin and smoking affect aging of genes
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... There is no better ... according to a special report in the May issue of Consumer Reports focused on ... quality ranking for results achieved during and after coronary bypass and aortic valve replacement ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... the continuation of its strategic partnership with and platinum sponsorship of Global Spine ... the safe and effective management of complex spine deformity cases, particularly in children. ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... April 24, 2017 , ... ... Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) capabilities at Telehealth 2.0, the American Telemedicine Association’s ... bundles, which pairs medical devices with a pre-programmed tablet in a remarkably easy-to-use ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... April 24, 2017 , ... The Santana Telehealth Project ... 2017: Telehealth 2.0 — the American Telemedicine Association’s annual conference, on April 23 in ... for using telemedicine to improve the lives of the poor and underserved in other ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... , ... April 24, 2017 , ... As part of ... today to honor the victims of the Holocaust and Nazi persecution, Center for ... Hadamar and Auschwitz on its CMATH Champions trip to Germany and Poland next week. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2017)... India , April 19, 2017 ... and Application, Forecast to 2022 report has covered and analysed ... statistics and information on market size, shares and growth factors. ... major drivers, challenges and opportunities in the global market. ... Browse 152 Tables and Figures, ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... 2017  Novartis today announced the publication of ... and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes ... with treatment-naïve severe aplastic anemia (SAA) achieved complete ... at the initiation of and concurrently with standard ... sequential treatment groups, or cohorts. Cohort 3 added ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... DALLAS , April 18, 2017 Viverae ... proud to announce the integration of IBM ® ... platform to deliver targeted communications for a personalized experience. ... meaningful actions on their health in real time. The ... that matter most to members, wherever they are in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: