Navigation Links
Cancer drug may also work for scleroderma
Date:9/22/2011

CHICAGO --- A drug used to treat cancer may also be effective in diseases that cause scarring of the internal organs or skin, such as pulmonary fibrosis or scleroderma.

The drug, with the generic name bortezomib, stopped the production of fibrotic proteins in human cells and the development of fibrous scarring in a mouse model of fibrotic disease, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study published in the journal Thorax.

"This drug appears to put the brakes on abnormal development of scar tissue in the lungs and skin and may also work in other organs," said lead author Manu Jain, M.D., associate professor of medicine and of pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a physician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Children's Memorial Hospital. "These diseases have a high fatality rate, and there is no truly effective treatment for them right now."

Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease that causes progressive thickening and tightening of the skin and can lead to serious internal organ damage and, in some cases, death. Scleroderma affects an estimated 300,000 people in the United States, most frequently young to middle-aged women.

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a scarring or thickening of the lungs without any known cause that makes it increasingly difficult to breathe. It may affect up to 200,000 people in the U.S. between 50 and 70 years old.

Jain said the drug appears to inhibit a protein called transforming growth factor beta, which is essential for the growth of the scar tissue. Patients with fibrosis have increased levels and activity of the growth factor. Bortezomib is currently used to treat multiple myeloma and lymphoma.

In the study, when researchers gave bortezomib to mice, it prevented the development of a fibrotic-like disease. "The mice that normally get this disease didn't get it," Jain said.

Researchers also took fibroblast cells from scleroderma and pulmonary fibrosis patients and incubated those cells with the drug. Fibroblast cells are believed to be important in the development of scarring in humans. The drug prevented the expression of proteins that are necessary for scarring.


'/>"/>

Contact: Marla Paul
Marla-Paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Popular Diabetes Drugs May Raise Pancreatic Cancer Risk, Study Suggests
2. Virus kills breast cancer cells in laboratory
3. Lung cancer research team awarded $1.43 million to study cancer in Eastern Kentucky
4. TGen-Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center launches clinical trial for drug to treat lung cancer
5. New Test Predicts Risk for Impotence After Prostate Cancer Therapy
6. Genes May Explain Blacks Bleaker Prostate Cancer Stats
7. The War on Cancer Continues
8. John Theurer Cancer Center among first clinical trial sites to join landmark MMRF study
9. MRI Can Spot Breast Cancer in High-Risk Women: Study
10. Higher Risk of Second Breast Cancer Seen in Black Women
11. 10 ways to make better decisions about cancer care
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/2/2016)... OH (PRWEB) , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... of veterinarian diagnostic imaging systems and the first company to offer ... With a Heart at their tradeshow booth # 941 for the American Association ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, at The House of Yahweh in ... fits into Bible Prophecy. Yisrayl says this generation, known as the Last Generation, started ... how the details line up exactly with Bible Prophecy – a protected way for ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... On ... individuals and families from eight different sites throughout Miami-Dade and Broward counties. This ... volunteers worked very hard on Thanksgiving morning by putting together individual meals via ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... 2016 , ... ‘Tis the season for giving! Today, 20 creative teams across ... Partnership and the Drug Enforcement Administration as part of the National Red Ribbon Week ... schools who decorated their campuses with this year’s Red Ribbon Week theme: “YOLO. Be ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... ... November 30, 2016 , ... "I hate when the mixture of saliva ... teeth," said an inventor from Bridgewater, N.J. "I thought that there had to be ... , He developed the patent-pending DEFLECTOR to prevent saliva and toothpaste from running down ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... , December 2, 2016 ... Vitro Diagnostics/IVD Market by Product (Instruments, Reagents, Software), ... (Diabetes, Oncology, Cardiology, Nephrology, Infectious Diseases) - Forecast ... is valued at USD 60.22 Billion in 2016. ... CAGR of 5.5% during the forecast period (2016-2021) ...
(Date:12/2/2016)...  PipelineRx, a leading medication management technology company ... of its SaaS-based telepharmacy platform, PowerGridRx™ , ... Midyear Clinical Meeting and Exhibition, December 5-7 in ... 300 hospital clients nationally, the Company is a ... dramatically improve pharmacy operations, enhance patient safety, and ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... -- On Thursday, December 1st 2016, the ... development and innovation in the biopharmaceutical industry at its ... the presence of Sergey Tsyb, Vice Minister of Industry ... , Natalia Sanina, First Vice Chairman of the State ... Roszdravnadzor, National Service of Control in Healthcare, Sergey Muravev, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: