Navigation Links
Cancer drug effectively treats transplant rejections
Date:12/26/2008

CINCINNATIUniversity of Cincinnati (UC) researchers have discovered a new therapy for transplant patients, targeting the antibody-producing plasma cells that can cause organ rejection.

Results of the study are published in the Dec. 27, 2008, edition of the journal Transplantation.

Steve Woodle, MD, and colleagues found that a cancer drugbortezomibused to treat multiple myeloma, or cancer of the plasma cells, is effective in treating rejection episodes caused by antibodies that target transplanted kidneys and reversing rejection episodes that did not respond to standard therapies.

B-lymphocytes, or B cells, play a large role in the humoral immune response by making immune proteins that attack transplanted organs.

"We found a body of literature demonstrating that bortezomib works well in suppressing transplant rejection in the laboratory," says Woodle, lead author of the study and chief of transplant surgery at UC. "Moreover, it worked well in models of autoimmune diseases."

T-lymphocytes, or T cells, are white blood cells that were commonly thought to cause the rejection of transplanted organs.

Woodle and his team began searching for agents that targeted plasma cells in 2005.

"It has become clear that plasma cells and the antibodies they produce play a bigger role in rejection than previously thought, and the development of therapies targeting these cells has lagged," he says. "We realized that current therapies don't target the plasma cells which may produce the antibody, in general."

Researchers administered this drug to six kidney transplant recipients with treatment-resistant organ rejection, evaluating and recording their responses to the treatment.

In each case, treatment with the drug provided prompt rejection reversal, prolonged reductions in antibody levels and improved organ function with suppression of recurrent rejection for at least five months.

Jason Everly, a board-certified oncology pharmacist in the division of transplant surgery at UC and co-author of the study, says the toxicities associated with this drug were predictable and manageable and were much less than those associated with other anti-cancer agents.

"We are pleased to see its toxicities are similar in transplant recipients suffering from treatment-resistant mixed organ rejection," he adds. "We hope it will be a viable therapeutic treatment option in this patient group."

Woodle says although this data is promising, it is difficult to overestimate the implications of this drug.

"We have an immunosuppressive agent that for the first time can target antibody-producing plasma cells with an efficacy similar to drugs that target T cells," he says. "This has significant implications for transplantation and auto immune disease."

UC researchers are currently conducting four industry-supported clinical trials to expand these findings.


'/>"/>

Contact: Katie Pence
katie.pence@uc.edu
513-558-4561
University of Cincinnati
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. A new light on tumor immunotherapy for gastric cancer
2. Cancer Medicine Advances on Many Fronts
3. 5,000 Medical Leaders Report Latest Advancements in Biomedical Technologies; Breakthroughs by 2015 Predicted for Alzheimer's, Heart Disease, Cancer, and Diabetes
4. E. coli engineered to produce important class of antibiotic, anti-cancer drugs
5. Gene Variant Tied to Smokers Risk of Lung Cancer
6. Renowned Cancer Researcher Dan Von Hoff, M.D. Advocates for 'The Lost Opportunity in Phase I Oncology Trials'
7. Holiday Online Auction - Dedicated to Awareness of Male Breast Cancer - Hosted by John W. Nick Foundation, Inc. at MaleBreastCancer.org
8. Mutations common to cancer and developmental disorder examined in a novel disease model
9. SNPs of ABC transporter genes linked to lung cancer risk
10. Gene Boosts Drinkers Colon Cancer Risk
11. Groundbreaking, inexpensive, pocket-sized ultrasound device can help treat cancer, relieve arthritis
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... for human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and other difficult to transfect cells, ... Cloning Medium. The PluriQ™ G9™ Gene Editing System is a complete ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... To ... infrastructure. Most providers, however, are unsure how to move forward, given the need ... define a path forward tailored to an organization’s specific needs. , PYA Principal ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... SpiritQuest Sedona ... heart of West Sedona, surrounded by famous vortex sites: Cathedral Rock, Airport Mesa, and ... partner properties – the Lodge at Sedona as well as the Sedona Rouge, both ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... An ... may expose a possible link between head and neck cancer in individuals with unhealthy ... the study were evaluated based on whether they had gum disease, brushed their teeth ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... 23, 2016 , ... SyncDog, Inc. , the leading ... is featured in the current issue of Silicon Review magazine. Silicon ... technology solutions and features them in their magazine. The magazine allows top-level executives ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... FRANKLIN, Tenn. , June 23, 2016 ... for automating, integrating and transforming the patient ... launch of several innovative new products and ... depth of its revenue cycle offerings. These ... establish more efficient workflows, remain compliant in ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Leading ... that address medical conditions resulting from a breakdown ... has appointed Greg Doyle as chief ... Leading BioSciences, executive management team and board of ... chief financial officer. He will provide continued leadership ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- On Wednesday, June 22, 2016, the NASDAQ ... Dow Jones Industrial Average edged 0.27% lower to finish at ... Stock-Callers.com has initiated coverage on the following equities: Alkermes PLC ... AMAG ), IDEXX Laboratories Inc. (NASDAQ: IDXX ... Learn more about these stocks by accessing their free trade ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: