Navigation Links
Cancer Risk From Radiation Doesn't Fade With Age
Date:10/27/2010

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) --Middle-aged adults may face as high a risk for developing cancer as a result of radiation exposure as younger adults and children, new research suggests.

Although children are thought to be more sensitive to the long-term impact of radiation and related cancer risks, the current observation runs counter to some previous research suggesting that as people age, their vulnerability to radiation-induced cancer diminishes.

"Overall, the weight of the epidemiological evidence suggests that for adult exposures, radiation risks do not generally decrease with increasing age at exposure," a team of authors from Columbia University in New York City said in a news release.

The findings are published in the Oct. 25 online issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The study's conclusion is based on a review of data concerning Japanese survivors of the atomic bomb, whose radiation cancers were attributable to one of two causes: genetic mutations caused by radiation that turned normal stem cells into precancerous cells, or an increase in the number of already existing precancerous cells.

Using a newly designed risk analysis model, the authors looked at the age of the survivors at the time the bomb was dropped and then tracked the ensuing incidence of cancer.

In turn, they used the same statistical framework to predict cancer risk by age of radiation exposure among people aged 30 to 60 in the U.S. population.

The finding: For some types of tumors, cancer risk does appear to increase following radiation exposure among individuals in this age bracket -- a discovery they said could have practical implications, since most X-ray procedures and jobs requiring radiation exposure involve middle-aged people.

In an accompanying editorial, John D. Boice of the International Epidemiology Institute in Rockville, Md., and Vanderbilt University in Nashville, noted that prior studies contradict the current findings and that generalizing the Japanese data to the U.S. population may be problematic.

But he concluded that the current effort "raises provocative hypotheses and conclusions that -- although preliminary -- draw attention to the continued importance of low-dose radiation exposures in our society."

More information

For more on radiation exposure risk, visit the U.S National Institutes of Health.

-- Alan Mozes

SOURCE: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, news release, Oct. 25, 2010.


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Portable breast scanner allows cancer detection in the blink of an eye
2. VCA fellowship funding to extend ovarian cancer research
3. Colorectal cancer patients with gene mutation show better response to cancer agent
4. New Insights on Who Should Take Erbitux for Colon Cancer
5. Childhood Cancer Survivors Risk Future GI Problems
6. Targeted radiation therapy minimizes GI side effects for prostate cancer patients, Penn study shows
7. Use Anemia Drugs for Cancer Patients With Caution, Experts Say
8. New guideline from ASH and ASCO recommends caution regarding ESA use in cancer patients
9. Stroma may provide key to better cancer treatment
10. PSA Test Reduces Risk of Spread if Prostate Cancer Strikes
11. Aspirin May Help Patients Beat Prostate Cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Cancer Risk From Radiation Doesn't Fade With Age
(Date:2/7/2016)... Orion, Clarkston, Metamora, Michigan (PRWEB) , ... February ... ... to correct pelvic organ prolapse with the latest techniques and the most minimally ... risk for pelvic organ prolapse, particularly after menopause. Other risk factors include surgery ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... ... February 07, 2016 , ... ... MyDecision™ empowers employers and organizations with the tools and information to lower the ... elements to cut the cost of providing employee healthcare benefits by as much ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... February 06, 2016 , ... FOR ... AT AORN SURGICAL CONFERENCE & EXPO , WHAT:     , This conference is ... 5000 perioperative nurses in attendance to study the latest evidence-based recommendations and ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... February 06, 2016 , ... With the FCPX LUT: Summer ... to their footage. A LUT is a Lookup Table that contains a mathematical formula ... indicated by the table. By manipulating each pixel, LUT's can change each color range ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... 06, 2016 , ... Research has shown that building shame ... frequency and level of relapse. , At the 2016 iaedp Symposium, ... explore the critical tasks of the recovery phase and beyond including relapse prevention ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... NORRITON, Pa. , Feb. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... of November Research Group (NRG),s pharmacovigilance technology ... pharmacovigilance system-related consulting services and an Oracle Argus ... compliance services to Life Sciences companies. ... strengthens and expands HighPoint,s life sciences capabilities and ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , Switzerland and PALO ALTO, Calif. , ... biological and chemical manufacturing, and Kodiak Sciences Inc., a ... treatment of retinal disease, announced today agreements for the ... Lonza will manufacture material at multiple sites, including Slough ... --> --> Retinal diseases, such ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , Feb. 8, 2016  Avista Pharma Solutions ("Avista ... Setzer as Chief Financial Officer (CFO). Mr. Setzer is ... of experience in various roles within growing technology and ... served as the Executive Director of Finance at INC ... Raleigh, NC . Previously, Mr. Setzer served ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: