Navigation Links
Cancer Drug May Flush Out 'Hidden' HIV: Study
Date:7/25/2012

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Medications can eliminate any sign of HIV from the bloodstream, but the virus that causes AIDS never vanishes for good. Instead, it hides in the body, waiting to strike again.

Now, researchers report that they may have discovered a way to use a cancer drug to make the infected cells more visible, potentially allowing them to be killed.

It's too early to know if the approach will actually help patients get rid of the virus forever. The optimistic hopes of scientists, who are forever seeking an AIDS cure, could be snarled by side effects or some other medical hitch.

But the findings are a promising start, said study author Dr. David Margolis, a professor of medicine at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

"We just wanted to show that we could get the virus to come out and show itself," he said. "This doesn't tell you that we have a cure for AIDS that everyone can take tomorrow. It begins us on a road to accomplish that goal."

At issue is HIV's ability to hide in the body. Scientists suspect that the virus "hijacks" certain kinds of immune cells -- the ones that remember how to deal with certain kinds of germs -- and lurk inside them. Thanks to this hijacking ability, medications and the immune system itself can't find and kill the virus or prevent it from multiplying.

The virus can move out of the immune cells if AIDS medications fail or if patients stop taking them. That means HIV can't currently be cured.

In the new study, researchers gave single doses of a skin cancer chemotherapy drug called vorinostat (Zolinza) to eight HIV-infected patients. The drug seemed to flush out the hidden virus so it was more easily visible.

None of the patients reported side effects, but they only took one dose.

Manufacturer information for cancer patients who take the drug lists serious side effects including dehydration, clots (rare), low red blood cell levels and high blood sugar.

As far as AIDS treatment, the next steps will be to figure out the best dose of the cancer drug and discover if medications or the immune system will kill the virus once it's loose.

"We don't know how to use this drug yet, and we don't know if we have to use it all the time every day for weeks or months and months," study author Margolis said. "We may just need to use it a few days here, then rest, on and off, until we get to the goal we need to get to."

One big question is whether it's possible to fully eliminate the "reservoir" of hidden virus in the body, said AIDS researcher Joseph Kulkosky, an associate professor of biology at Chestnut Hill College, in Philadelphia. Still, he said, it may be possible to at least get at some of it.

Another AIDS researcher, Alberto Bosque, a research assistant professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine, praised the study but cautioned that "we are at the beginning of the race towards HIV eradication, where the unknowns and uncertainties exceed our knowledge."

The study appears in the July 26 issue of the journal Nature.

More information

For more about AIDS, try the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: David Margolis, M.D., professor, medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Joseph Kulkosky, Ph.D., associate professor, biology, Chestnut Hill College, Philadelphia; Alberto Bosque, Ph.D., research assistant professor, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City; July 26, 2012, Nature


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists looking for noninvasive ways to detect lung cancer early
2. If Colonoscopy Picks Up Cancer Risk, Get Next Screen in 5 Years: Study
3. Child Abuse Linked to Higher Odds for Cancer as Adult
4. Women who give birth after age 30 lower their risk of endometrial cancer
5. John Theurer Cancer Center researchers shed light on new multiple myeloma therapy
6. New probe provides vital assist in brain cancer surgery
7. Researchers find driver of breast cancer stem cell metastasis
8. Novel pig model may be useful for human cancer studies
9. Colonoscopy screening markedly reduces colorectal cancer incidence and death
10. A new route for tackling treatment-resistant prostate cancer
11. Antioxidants Might Help Cut Pancreatic Cancer Risk, Study Suggests
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Cancer Drug May Flush Out 'Hidden' HIV: Study
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... 2016 , ... One way to ignore solid evidence is to dismiss research ... toss the baby out with the bathwater when we ignore all studies because some ... and otherwise making better use of education policy research. , “When readers heed basic ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2016 , ... USA Medical Card reminds us that May ... (CDC), a stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States; someone ... almost a quarter of them in individuals under 65 years old. A stroke is ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... today announced a new Residency Education & Collaboration Platform for hospitals and ... resources, and a host of collaboration tools designed to improve patient outcomes ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... 2016 , ... A first-time look at workers’ compensation claims in Kentucky found ... Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) announced, and that costs per claim were stable between ... Edition , found that indemnity costs per claim and benefit delivery expenses per claim ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... , ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... has partnered with Community Oncology Pharmacy Association (COPA) to develop a comprehensive Specialty ... of oncology by introducing an accreditation distinction. ACHC provides a wide range of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... April 27, 2016 Oasmia ... developer of a new generation of drugs within ... survival results for Paclical/Apealea in the Phase III ... with epithelial ovarian cancer. These preliminary results showed ... combination with carboplatin versus Taxol in combination with ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... , April 26, 2016 Diplomat Pharmacy, ... of Jennifer Hagerman , Pharm D., to Vice ... growing role at Diplomat, Hagerman will continue to lead ... company that delivers custom education and training to Diplomat ... specialty pharmacy industry. Diplomat University also houses the quality ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... , April 26, 2016 Research ... and Credit Risk Analysis of the Biological Medicine Industry ... This comprehensive report analyzes the financial assessment and credit ... China . The report provides readers with an ... all market participants should be aware of. It considers ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: