Navigation Links
Can weight loss help African-American breast cancer survivors?
Date:4/24/2012

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago's Institute for Health Research and Policy have designed a novel community-based weight loss intervention designed for African American breast cancer survivors.

Under a five-year, $3 million grant from the National Cancer Institute, researchers will determine if the program, called Moving Forward, is effective in decreasing body mass index and weight and improving diet and physical activity habits. They will also evaluate the effect of weight loss on blood pressure, cholesterol and quality of life.

African American women exhibit higher breast cancer mortality rates than white women; in Chicago the breast cancer mortality rate for black women is 116 percent higher than the rate for white women, says Melinda Stolley, principal investigator of the study and institute researcher.

Poor diet, lack of physical activity and obesity contribute to breast cancer progression and may intensify other conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease, she said.

"One of the cruel things about being diagnosed with breast cancer is that most women gain weight post-treatment -- on average 5 to 7 pounds -- which is not fully understood. We want to target African American women because nearly 78 percent of African American women are overweight or obese."

Physical activity has been shown to improve survival in breast cancer patients, Stolley said, but there has been very little research on weight loss in African American breast cancer survivors.

UIC will partner with the Chicago Park District to implement the study in the Roseland/Pullman, Englewood, Austin, South Shore and Lawndale neighborhoods.

The randomized study will recruit 240 African American breast cancer survivors who have completed treatment at least six months prior; are overweight; are physically able to participate in moderate physical activity; and are not currently in a structured weight loss program.

The goal of the weight loss intervention is to address health behavior change at an individual level while acknowledging the importance of culture, family lifestyles, community traditions and social support, said Stolley. A pilot study "was effective in significantly reducing dietary fat and significantly increasing vegetable intake, vigorous activity, and social support." Women in the pilot study lost five and a half pounds during the six-month intervention.

Women in the program will receive a free 12-month membership to a participating park district location where they will attend twice weekly exercise and educational sessions. Participants in the control group will meet weekly to learn about general health topics. At the end of the program all participants will receive a 12-month free membership to the Chicago Park District.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sherri McGinnis Gonzlez
smcginn@uic.edu
312-996-8277
University of Illinois at Chicago
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Overweight Pregnant Women at Higher Risk for Complications
2. Weight-Loss Surgery Beat Drugs for Cutting Diabetes in Very Obese
3. Even Preschoolers View the Overweight Negatively
4. Tree nut consumption associated with lower body weight and lower prevalence of health risks
5. Weight-Loss Surgeries May Beat Standard Treatments for Diabetes
6. Too Much Exercise Delays Pregnancy in Normal-Weight Women: Study
7. How to best help your child lose weight: Lose weight yourself
8. Weight-Loss Surgery Seems Safe for Kidney Disease Patients
9. FDA Weighs Fate of Qnexa for Weight Loss, Again
10. Weight Training May Help Parkinsons Patients Retain Function
11. Switching to Water, Diet Drinks Linked to Modest Weight Loss
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... alumni Hannah Randall, PharmD ‘17, and Jennifer Huggins, PharmD ’17, along with ... for the primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases during the 15th Annual Women’s ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... BASKING RIDGE, N.J. (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... second annual Holly Day Market. Featuring a collection of specialty vendors and unique items ... myriad of personalized and quality-focused health and wellness services offered by the VNA. ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Talented host, ... lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of "Success Files," which is an ... and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with passion and integrity. , Sciatica ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range of technology and learning ... Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held October 14–18, 2017 at ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... IsoComforter, Inc. ( https://isocomforter.com ), one ... an innovative new design of the shoulder pad. The shoulder pad provides optimal ... controlling your pain while using cold therapy. By utilizing ice and water that is ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... , Oct. 11, 2017  Caris Life Sciences ... on fulfilling the promise of precision medicine, today announced ... joined Caris, Precision Oncology Alliance™ (POA) as its 17 ... centers, the St. Jude Crosson Cancer Institute will help ... the use of tumor profiling, making cancer treatment more ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... COUNTY, Calif. , Oct. 10, 2017  NDS received FDA ... Mobile  — a medical-grade battery-powered display stand specifically designed for endoscopy ... to transform technology into a clinical solution to support the improvement ... Innovative Design ... ZeroWire Mobile Wireless Solution ...
(Date:10/5/2017)... ROSEMONT, Ill. , Oct. 5, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ ... American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) ... than opioids – to be used as a ... post-surgical pain. ... relationship, the AAOMS White Paper "Opioid Prescribing: Acute ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: