Navigation Links
Camaraderie of sports teams may deter bullying, violence

WASHINGTON, DC As schools around the country look for ways to reduce violence and bullying, they may want to consider encouraging students to participate in team sports, according to a study to be presented Sunday, May 5, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Washington, DC.

Researchers analyzed data from the 2011 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey to see if athletic participation was associated with violence-related behaviors, including fighting, carrying a weapon and being bullied. A representative sample of 1,820 high school students in the state completed the survey, which also asked adolescents whether they played any school-sponsored team sports (e.g., football) or individual sports (e.g. track).

Results showed that half of the students ages 14-18 years reported playing a school-sponsored sport: 25 percent were on a team, 9 percent participated in an individual sport, and 17 percent played both individual and team sports.

Girls who played individual or team sports were less likely to report having been in a physical fight in the past year than girls who didn't participate in sports (14 percent vs. 22 percent). Female athletes also were less likely carry a weapon in the past 30 days than non-athletes (6 percent vs. 11 percent).

However, there was no difference in reported physical fighting in the past year or weapon carrying in the past 30 days between boys who played sports and those who did not. Approximately 32 percent of boys reported physical fighting, and 36 percent reported carrying weapons in the past 30 days.

"Athletic participation may prevent involvement in violence-related activities among girls but not among boys because aggression and violence generally might be more accepted in boys' high school sports," said senior author Tamera Coyne-Beasley, MD, MPH, FSAHM, FAAP, professor of pediatrics and internal medicine at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Coaches, school administrators and parents should be aware that students who participate in sports might still be at risk for fighting and carrying weapons, added presenting author Robert W. Turner, PhD, research associate and Carolina postdoctoral fellow for faculty diversity at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Survey results also indicated that boys who played team sports were less likely to report being bullied than boys who played individual sports.

"Though we don't know if boys who play team sports are less likely to be the perpetrators of bullying, we know that they are less likely to be bullied," Dr. Coyne-Beasley noted. "Perhaps creating team-like environments among students such that they may feel part of a group or community could lead to less bullying."


Contact: Susan Stevens Martin
American Academy of Pediatrics

Related medicine news :

1. SAGE and AOSSM launch the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
2. Dehydration is a problem in combat sports
3. Left Coast Sports Innovation Launches New Website To Highlight The New “Grip and Assist” Mobility Gait Belt
4. FDA Warns Against Sale of Sports Supplements in U.S.
5. Given Brand Sports Now Offers a Full Line of High-Tech Running Watches and Gear Helping Athletes Set Their Race P.R.'s
6. College Sports Could Raise Players Risk for Depression, Study Finds
7. New study aims to prevent sports-related brain injury in youngsters
8. A new era in sports science journals: The launch of BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
9. National Exercise & Sports Trainers Association Offers Functional Training Specialist Program with Focus on Great Form, Function and Fitness
10. Sports Gamblers Wrongly Bet on Their Sense of Control: Study
11. Its a sure thing: Knowledge of the game is not an advantage in sports gambling
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/28/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Beginning November 30th at 6:00 a.m. EST until 11:59 p.m. EST, ... savings of up to 20% off orders $80 or more to free gifts with purchases, ... hours. , As a competitive e-commerce website for skin care and cosmetic needs, customers will ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... , ... According to an article published November 13th on, ... D.C. revolved around the fact that proper dental care, both at-home and in the ... between periodontal disease (more commonly referred to as gum disease) and diabetes. According to ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 27, 2015 , ... The rapid speed at which Americans ... more care is needed, especially with Alzheimer’s, dementia and other cognitive conditions becoming ... The forgotten part of this equation: 80 percent of medical care occurs in ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... "When ... said an inventor from Hillside, N.J. "Many people catch diseases simply from sitting ... individuals will always be protected from germs." , He developed the patent-pending QUDRATECS ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... ProSidebar: Fashion is a set of ... With ProSidebar: Fasion, video editors can easily add an informative sidebar to any FCPX ... Utilize presets featuring self-animating drop zones, lines, bars, and text with the ease ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/29/2015)... Royal Philips  (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA) revealed a portfolio ... Society of North America Annual Meeting (RSNA), beginning today ... Chicago . Visitors to the Philips booth ... integrated Diagnostic Imaging, Clinical Informatics, Image Guided Therapy and ... and create a superior patient experience. ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... Une nouvelle approche consistant ... contre le cancer avancé.    --> ... au traitement photodynamique au Bremachlorin contre le cancer ... nouvelle approche consistant à combiner l,immunothérapie au traitement ...    Clinical Cancer Research . ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... Nov. 26, 2015 ... of the "2016 Global Tumor Marker ... Volume and Sales Segment Forecasts, Innovative Technologies, ... report to their offering. --> ... the "2016 Global Tumor Marker Testing ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: