Navigation Links
Camaraderie of sports teams may deter bullying, violence

WASHINGTON, DC As schools around the country look for ways to reduce violence and bullying, they may want to consider encouraging students to participate in team sports, according to a study to be presented Sunday, May 5, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Washington, DC.

Researchers analyzed data from the 2011 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey to see if athletic participation was associated with violence-related behaviors, including fighting, carrying a weapon and being bullied. A representative sample of 1,820 high school students in the state completed the survey, which also asked adolescents whether they played any school-sponsored team sports (e.g., football) or individual sports (e.g. track).

Results showed that half of the students ages 14-18 years reported playing a school-sponsored sport: 25 percent were on a team, 9 percent participated in an individual sport, and 17 percent played both individual and team sports.

Girls who played individual or team sports were less likely to report having been in a physical fight in the past year than girls who didn't participate in sports (14 percent vs. 22 percent). Female athletes also were less likely carry a weapon in the past 30 days than non-athletes (6 percent vs. 11 percent).

However, there was no difference in reported physical fighting in the past year or weapon carrying in the past 30 days between boys who played sports and those who did not. Approximately 32 percent of boys reported physical fighting, and 36 percent reported carrying weapons in the past 30 days.

"Athletic participation may prevent involvement in violence-related activities among girls but not among boys because aggression and violence generally might be more accepted in boys' high school sports," said senior author Tamera Coyne-Beasley, MD, MPH, FSAHM, FAAP, professor of pediatrics and internal medicine at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Coaches, school administrators and parents should be aware that students who participate in sports might still be at risk for fighting and carrying weapons, added presenting author Robert W. Turner, PhD, research associate and Carolina postdoctoral fellow for faculty diversity at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Survey results also indicated that boys who played team sports were less likely to report being bullied than boys who played individual sports.

"Though we don't know if boys who play team sports are less likely to be the perpetrators of bullying, we know that they are less likely to be bullied," Dr. Coyne-Beasley noted. "Perhaps creating team-like environments among students such that they may feel part of a group or community could lead to less bullying."


Contact: Susan Stevens Martin
American Academy of Pediatrics

Related medicine news :

1. SAGE and AOSSM launch the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
2. Dehydration is a problem in combat sports
3. Left Coast Sports Innovation Launches New Website To Highlight The New “Grip and Assist” Mobility Gait Belt
4. FDA Warns Against Sale of Sports Supplements in U.S.
5. Given Brand Sports Now Offers a Full Line of High-Tech Running Watches and Gear Helping Athletes Set Their Race P.R.'s
6. College Sports Could Raise Players Risk for Depression, Study Finds
7. New study aims to prevent sports-related brain injury in youngsters
8. A new era in sports science journals: The launch of BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
9. National Exercise & Sports Trainers Association Offers Functional Training Specialist Program with Focus on Great Form, Function and Fitness
10. Sports Gamblers Wrongly Bet on Their Sense of Control: Study
11. Its a sure thing: Knowledge of the game is not an advantage in sports gambling
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... , ... A simply groundbreaking television series, "Voices in America", which is hosted ... array of issues that are presently affecting Americans. Dedicated to providing the world with ... changing the subjects consumers focus on, one episode at a time. , In ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... the largest, most successful and prominent nonprofit healthcare organizations in the country. They ... involvement with various organizations, and helped advance the healthcare industry as a whole ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Patients at Serenity Point Recovery, a holistic ... Thanksgiving Day to share the things that they are most grateful for today. ... channel, patients displayed what they wrote on index cards, describing the things that ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... workshops to discuss bioavailability and the need to integrate dose form selection in ... collaboration with OBN, the membership organization supporting and bringing together the UK’s emerging ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... of retro-fused, self-animating trailer titles with ProTrailer: Vintage. This newly styled ProTrailer pack ... trailer titles work with any font, giving users limitless opportunities to stylize and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... -- ) has announced the ... Viscosity Drugs" report to their offering. ... of the "Self Administration of High Viscosity ... Research and Markets ( ) has ... of High Viscosity Drugs" report to their ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... DUBLIN , Nov. 25, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... announced the addition of the "Global ... to their offering. --> ... "Global Brain Monitoring Devices Market 2015-2019" ... Research and Markets ( ) ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 25, 2015  Linden Care, LLC, a retail specialty ... for patients suffering from chronic pain, said today that ... Restraining Order (TRO) enjoining Express Scripts from unilaterally terminating ... --> --> The company ... legal options. --> --> ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: