Navigation Links
Camaraderie of sports teams may deter bullying, violence
Date:5/4/2013

WASHINGTON, DC As schools around the country look for ways to reduce violence and bullying, they may want to consider encouraging students to participate in team sports, according to a study to be presented Sunday, May 5, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Washington, DC.

Researchers analyzed data from the 2011 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey to see if athletic participation was associated with violence-related behaviors, including fighting, carrying a weapon and being bullied. A representative sample of 1,820 high school students in the state completed the survey, which also asked adolescents whether they played any school-sponsored team sports (e.g., football) or individual sports (e.g. track).

Results showed that half of the students ages 14-18 years reported playing a school-sponsored sport: 25 percent were on a team, 9 percent participated in an individual sport, and 17 percent played both individual and team sports.

Girls who played individual or team sports were less likely to report having been in a physical fight in the past year than girls who didn't participate in sports (14 percent vs. 22 percent). Female athletes also were less likely carry a weapon in the past 30 days than non-athletes (6 percent vs. 11 percent).

However, there was no difference in reported physical fighting in the past year or weapon carrying in the past 30 days between boys who played sports and those who did not. Approximately 32 percent of boys reported physical fighting, and 36 percent reported carrying weapons in the past 30 days.

"Athletic participation may prevent involvement in violence-related activities among girls but not among boys because aggression and violence generally might be more accepted in boys' high school sports," said senior author Tamera Coyne-Beasley, MD, MPH, FSAHM, FAAP, professor of pediatrics and internal medicine at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Coaches, school administrators and parents should be aware that students who participate in sports might still be at risk for fighting and carrying weapons, added presenting author Robert W. Turner, PhD, research associate and Carolina postdoctoral fellow for faculty diversity at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Survey results also indicated that boys who played team sports were less likely to report being bullied than boys who played individual sports.

"Though we don't know if boys who play team sports are less likely to be the perpetrators of bullying, we know that they are less likely to be bullied," Dr. Coyne-Beasley noted. "Perhaps creating team-like environments among students such that they may feel part of a group or community could lead to less bullying."


'/>"/>

Contact: Susan Stevens Martin
ssmartin@aap.org
847-434-7131
American Academy of Pediatrics
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. SAGE and AOSSM launch the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
2. Dehydration is a problem in combat sports
3. Left Coast Sports Innovation Launches New Website To Highlight The New “Grip and Assist” Mobility Gait Belt
4. FDA Warns Against Sale of Sports Supplements in U.S.
5. Given Brand Sports Now Offers a Full Line of High-Tech Running Watches and Gear Helping Athletes Set Their Race P.R.'s
6. College Sports Could Raise Players Risk for Depression, Study Finds
7. New study aims to prevent sports-related brain injury in youngsters
8. A new era in sports science journals: The launch of BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
9. National Exercise & Sports Trainers Association Offers Functional Training Specialist Program with Focus on Great Form, Function and Fitness
10. Sports Gamblers Wrongly Bet on Their Sense of Control: Study
11. Its a sure thing: Knowledge of the game is not an advantage in sports gambling
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/8/2016)... FL (PRWEB) , ... December 08, 2016 , ... Coppin ... business owners and families in and around the Cape Coral area, is embarking on ... Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida. , The Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Fort Payne, AL (PRWEB) , ... December 08, ... ... enterprise offering insurance and financial consulting services to residential and commercial clients in ... raise awareness and support for Nobis Works. , Since 1977, Nobis Works has ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... , ... DrugDev again demonstrated its dedication to reducing the administrative ... adopters completing EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Certification from the U.S. Department of Commerce. , ... the Atlantic with a mechanism to comply with EU data protection requirements when transferring ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... "Today, MHA and ... comprehensive mental health systems reform legislation in more than fifty years. We applaud ... commitment of our elected officials to improving mental health services and supports in ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... , ... December 07, 2016 , ... ... drug in their bodies, a researcher at the Icahn School of Medicine at ... , The study found that when young children are exposed to secondhand marijuana ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... NEW YORK , Dec. 8, 2016 ... ... such as reducing loss of blood during surgeries, lowering the ... surgeries, and decreasing risks of SSIs. The patient warming systems ... and intravascular warming systems.These benefits in turn reduce the stay ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Dec. 8, 2016 KEY FINDINGS ... grow in 2017-2023. Various reasons for growth of the ... higher incidences of chronic diseases, high recovery cost of ... services. Medical lifting sling refers to an assistive ... mobility. These slings connect to the lift and hold ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... LONDON , Dec. 8, 2016 ... diagnostics includes products and tests that are used ... grass, weed, peanuts, milk, or drugs etc. in ... developed by the immune system. The report on ... future prospects of the market. The report consists ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: