Navigation Links
Call of the riled
Date:4/4/2011

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say a "stress response" mechanism used by normal cells to cope with harsh or demanding conditions is exploited by cancer cells, which transmit the same stress signal to surrounding cells, triggering an inflammatory response in them that can aid tumor growth.

The findings are reported by Maurizio Zanetti, MD, professor of medicine and director of the Laboratory of Immunology at the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, and colleagues, and published in the April 4 early online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the protein-making factory inside all cells. Increased physiological demands or disease conditions can sometimes cause proteins to misfold and accumulate in the ER. Cells typically respond by an ER stress response, which attempts to reset normal ER balance.

For normal cells, the ER stress response is transient. For tumor cells, it's life. Because they exist in an environment that's invariably difficult (their host is always trying to kill them, and oxygen and nutrient deprivation are frequent), tumor cells produce an on-going ER stress response, which helps them not only to survive, but to thrive.

According to Zanetti and colleagues, tumor cells generate "transmissible ER stress." Specifically, they induce bystander cells to issue a similar stress response, most notably nearby macrophages a type of white blood cell employed by the body's immune system to recognize and remove pathogens and cellular debris.

Recently, several laboratories, including some at UC San Diego, have underscored the crucial role of inflammation in promoting cancer growth. A consequence of "transmissible ER stress" points to "receiver" macrophages as an important source of inflammation, which serves as an environmental cue for cancer development.

"It's well-known that macrophages entering the tumor microenvironment lose the ability to aid the immune system in rejecting the tumor, and that they may actually play a role in actively suppressing anti-tumor immunity," said Zanetti. "We believe that transmissible ER stress could be an important initial tumor-derived signal that promotes the 'brainwashing' of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment. It could be the first event in a cascade that results in the commandeering of macrophages by the tumor."

If so, transmissible ER stress may represent a unifying mechanism that explains at least some of the earliest interactions between tumors and the immune system. "Our paper details the first evidence of this phenomenon," Zanetti said, adding that transmissible ER stress also presents a new, potential target for tumor-specific therapies and drugs.

"Our findings suggest that development of therapies targeted against the tumor ER stress response may be doubly effective," said Zanetti. "Such therapies would target not only the tumor's intrinsic ability to cope with microenvironmental insults, but, at the same time, would impede the tumor cells' ability to nullify the anti-tumor immune response, perhaps allowing our bodies to more easily fight off tumors."


'/>"/>

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego
Source:Eurekalert  

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Call of the riled
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... "TransFlare 4K Mystique comes with 44 colorful ... Pro X," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , TransFlare ... Sensor,TransFlare 4K Mystique lens flare and light leak transitions have a very high-dynamic range ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... , ... January 20, 2017 , ... “Code Word: Chocolate Biscuit”: a biographical account following ... Chocolate Biscuit” is the creation of published author, Marlyn Ivey, born in Lynn Haven, Florida ... went to school and at 19 years of age, he joined the Navy and got ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 20, 2017 , ... “Journey to Christmas:” a beautiful and enchanting ... of published author, Kimberly Cordoves, a mother of three in Oklahoma City, and a devoted ... idea of writing a book has been in the back of my mind for years, ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... ... Today, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced over 359,000 ... in 2017. Clinicians who participate in APMs are paid for the quality of care ... effort to build a system that delivers better care and one in which clinicians ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... ... cold weather here, many people will have to clear snow with snow blowers or shovels ... but they can be dangerous when used incorrectly. That’s why Amica Insurance is ... of snow blowers:, , When removing wet snow or debris from ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... Jan. 19, 2017  Sensus Healthcare, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... specializing in the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers ... superficial radiation therapy, today announced that it will ... financial results on Thursday, February 2, 2017 after the ... a conference call with the investment community on Thursday, ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... , Jan. 19, 2017   Science Exchange , ... to announce that the first five replication studies ... have been published in eLife today. Despite intense ... the first practical evaluation of reproducibility rates that ... studies. Unlike other assessments of reproducibility, the results ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... PALM BEACH, Florida , January 19, 2017 ... the incoming Trump administration appears serious about reducing ... boost advancements and innovation in the medical drug ... companies forge ahead with new clinical trials and ... and Pharma companies forging ahead with recent developments ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: