Navigation Links
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Date:2/26/2009

It might one day be used as an ingredient in sunscreen, researchers say

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Past studies have suggested that caffeine might offer some protection from skin cancer, and new research may explain why.

"We have found what we believe to be the mechanism by which caffeine is associated with decreased skin cancer," said lead researcher Dr. Paul Nghiem, an associate professor of dermatology at the University of Washington in Seattle.

For the study, Nghiem's team looked at caffeine's effect on human skin cells in a laboratory that had been exposed to ultraviolet radiation. They found that in cells damaged by UV rays, caffeine interrupted a protein called ATR-Chk1, causing the damaged cells to self-destruct.

"Caffeine has no effect on undamaged cells," Nghiem said.

ATR is essential to damaged cells that are growing rapidly, Nghiem said, and caffeine specifically targets damaged cells that can become cancerous. "Caffeine more than doubles the number of damaged cells that will die normally after a given dose of UV," he said.

"This is a biological mechanism that explains what we have been seeing for many years from the oral intake of caffeine," he added.

The findings were published online Feb. 26 in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

But, Nghiem added, people shouldn't increase the amount of coffee or tea they drink to prevent skin cancer. "You are talking a lot of cups for a lot of years for a relatively small effect," he said. "But if you like it, it's another reason to drink it."

Nghiem has also been experimenting with applying caffeine directly to the skin. "It suppresses skin cancer development by as much as 72 percent in mice, and human studies are moving ahead slowly," he said.

It's possible that topical caffeine preparations might one day be used to help prevent skin cancer, Nghiem said. "Caffeine is both a sunscreen and it deletes damaged cells," he said. "It may well make sense to put it into a sunscreen preparation."

Dr. Robin Ashinoff, a dermatologist and clinical associate professor of dermatology at New York University's Langone Medical Center, thinks these findings need to be verified before they can have any clinical application.

"This study tells me that caffeine may be a useful ingredient topically to remove ultraviolet-genetically damaged cells from reproducing," Ashinoff said. "This may help prevent the development of skin cancer."

"It is interesting that caffeine, which is thought to have a negative connotation, has already been shown to be associated with lower incidences of non-melanoma skin cancers in several epidemiological studies," she added.

Dr. Albert Lefkovits, a spokesman for the Skin Cancer Foundation and an associate clinical professor of dermatology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, doesn't think it's been proven that caffeine reduces the risk of skin cancer.

"While this is an interesting concept that has been explored before, it will take years of extensive testing to determine whether this will be a worthwhile prevention method," Lefkovits said.

"And, the study doesn't discuss how much caffeine would be needed for any real benefit," he said. "For instance, many people drink large amounts of caffeine on a daily basis and still get skin cancer. Protecting yourself from the sun is currently the only proven way to prevent skin cancer."

More information

To learn more about skin cancer, visit the American Cancer Society.



SOURCES: Paul Nghiem, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of dermatology, University of Washington, Seattle; Robin Ashinoff, M.D., dermatologist and clinical associate professor, dermatology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York City; Albert Lefkovits, M.D., spokesman, the Skin Cancer Foundation, and associate clinical professor of dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City; February 2009, Journal of Investigative Dermatology, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Caffeine Survey Reveals Most, Least Caffeinated Cities
2. Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
3. Consuming small amounts of caffeine when pregnant may affect the growth of an unborn child
4. Study examines association between caffeine consumption and breast cancer risk
5. Caffeine Consumption Doesnt Raise Overall Breast Cancer Risk
6. Java gives caffeine-naive a boost, too
7. Caffeine Could Stave Off Multiple Sclerosis
8. Caffeine May Block High Cholesterol Linked to Alzheimers
9. HowToDoThings.com Brews Up New Uses for Coffee That Will Perk You Up in Recognition of Marchs Caffeine Awareness Month
10. Good Morning America! Wake Up to Thinner Legs by Wearing Your Caffeine!
11. Caffeine Could Spell Trouble for Diabetics
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... ... The Santana Telehealth Project was honored with the 2017 ATA Humanitarian Award. The ... conference, on April 23 in Orlando, FL. , “I am proud that ATA is ... poor and underserved in other parts of the world,” said Jonathan Linkous, CEO of ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... ... , a national non-profit organization focusing on the prevention and early detection of breast and ... to announce Katie Thiede as their new Chief Executive Officer. In January, founder Lindsay Avner ... Board and launched a national search to find a visionary new leader to grow Bright ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... , ... April 24, 2017 , ... ... of unique liquid food supplements, announced its popular products are now available for ... , ALP Nutrition® prioritizes the use of premium natural ingredients in making all ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... April 24, 2017 , ... According to the U.S. Centers ... the lives of 62 Americans each day.(1) Yet since 2011, the Drug Enforcement ... and prescribers by more than half.(2) Novus Medical Detox Center , a ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... , ... As a former supermodel known for her timeless beauty, Joan Severance ... women is that she put all the words in her new book, "Manifest Your ... experiences and sparkling sense of humor have inspired her to write a book on ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/18/2017)... Viverae ® , a leader in workplace ... IBM ® Watson Campaign Automation, implementing behavioral messaging ... a personalized experience. Through digital engagement, the platform prompts ... real time. The enhanced experience drives engagement by focusing ... they are in their journey to health. ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... DIEGO , April 18, 2017  Astute Medical, ... a case series to be presented at the 2017 ... which begins today and continues through April 22. Physicians ... IGFBP-7 , used to assess risk for acute kidney ... decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Elevated levels ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... April 18, 2017  Socionext Inc. and SOINN ... in 2016, in which Socionext extracts and delivers ... companies achieved initial results in reading ultrasound images ... Brain SOINN. The results will be introduced at ... 19-21, at booths 4505 & 4507. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: