Navigation Links
CWRU researchers find byproducts of bacteria-causing gum disease incite oral cancer growth
Date:2/25/2014

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University have discovered how byproducts in the form of small fatty acids from two bacteria prevalent in gum disease incite the growth of deadly Kaposi's sarcoma-related (KS) lesions and tumors in the mouth.

The discovery could lead to early saliva testing for the bacteria, which, if found, could be treated and monitored for signs of cancer and before it develops into a malignancy, researchers say.

"These new findings provide one of the first looks at how the periodontal bacteria create a unique microenvironment in the oral cavity that contributes to the replication the Kaposi's sarcoma Herpesvirus (KSHV) and development of KS," said Fengchun Ye, the study's lead investigator from Case Western Reserve School of Dental Medicine's Department of Biological Sciences.

The discovery is described in The Journal of Virology article, "Short Chain Fatty Acids from Periodontal Pathogens Suppress HDACs, EZH2, and SUV39H1 to Promote Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Replication."

The research focuses on how the bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), which are associated with gum disease, contribute to cancer formation.

Ye said high levels of these bacteria are found in the saliva of people with periodontal disease, and at lower levels in those with good oral healthfurther evidence of the link between oral and overall physical health.

KS impacts a significant number of people with HIV, whose immune systems lack the ability to fight off the herpesvirus and other infections, he said.

"These individual are susceptible to the cancer," Ye said.

KS first appears as lesions on the surface of the mouth that, if not removed, can grow into malignant tumors. Survival rates are higher when detected and treated early in the lesion state than when a malignancy develops.

Also at risk are people with compromised immune systems: people on medications to suppress rejection of transplants, cancer patients on chemotherapies and the elderly population whose immune systems naturally weaken with age.

The researchers wanted to learn why most people never develop this form of cancer and what it is that protects them.

The researchers recruited 21 patients, dividing them into two groups. All participants were given standard gum-disease tests.

The first group of 11 participants had an average age of 50 and had severe chronic gum disease. The second group of 10 participants, whose average age was about 26, had healthy gums, practiced good oral health and showed no signs of bleeding or tooth loss from periodontal disease.

The researchers also studied a saliva sample from each. Part of the saliva sample was separated into its components using a spinning centrifuge. The remaining saliva was used for DNA testing to track and identify bacteria present, and at what levels.

The researchers were interested in Pg's and Fn's byproducts of lipopolysaccharide, fimbriae, proteinases and at least five different short-chain fatty acids (SCFA): butyric acid, isobutryic acid, isovaleric acid, propionic acid and acetic acid.

After initially testing the byproducts, the researchers suspected that the fatty acids were involved in replicating KSHV. The researchers cleansed the fatty acids and then introduced them to cells with quiescent KSHV virus in a petri dish for monitoring the virus' reaction.

After introducing SCFA, the virus began to replicate. But the researchers saw that, while the fatty acids allowed the virus to multiple, the process also set in motion a cascade of actions that also inhibited molecules in the body's immune system from stopping the growth of KSHV.

"The most important thing to come out of this study is that we believe periodontal disease is a risk factor for Kaposi sarcoma tumor in HIV patients," Ye said.

With that knowledge, Ye said those with HIV must be informed about the importance of good oral health and the possible consequences of overlooking that area.


'/>"/>
Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. NIH awards $20 million over 5 years to train next generation of global health researchers
2. Researchers develop a new cell and animal model of inflammatory breast cancer
3. Researchers uncover a viable way for colorectal cancer patients to overcome drug resistance
4. Researchers Find Gene Mutations That May Be a Key to Autism
5. Researchers find evidence of banned antibiotics in poultry products
6. NJ stroke researchers report advances in spatial neglect research at AAN Conference
7. Autism by the numbers: Yale researchers examine impact of new diagnostic criteria
8. Researchers Map Brain Regions Linked to Intelligence
9. Researchers ID Genes That May Determine Mental Illness
10. Researchers Develop Blood Test for Depression
11. University of Cincinnati researchers win $3.7M grant from US Department of Defense
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... , ... The president released a FY 2017 budget request on Tuesday that ... the cost burden to military beneficiaries. , MOAA’s president, retired Air Force Lt. ... including limited quantifiable benefit fixes mixed with numerous beneficiary fee hikes. , “We were ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... 2016 , ... The Chartis Group, a national advisory services ... the “2015/2016 Best in KLAS: Software and Services” report in two categories: IT ... insights firm on a global mission to improve healthcare delivery by amplifying the ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... to reverse diabetes has been gearing up for their simultaneous grand openings in ... It’s about right now that you’re probably wondering, is reversing diabetes possible? According ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... advocates will discuss how to improve care by making data on heart procedures ... disease. The Summit on Transparency and Public Reporting of Pediatric and Congenital Heart ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... Thermi™, a world leader ... to announce the promotions of Allison Kelly to executive vice president of the ... vice president of North American capital sales, and Wendy Oseas to vice president ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016 Potrero Medical, Inc., ... pleased to announce the appointment of George M. Rapier, ... San Antonio, TX , WellMed is one of ... 200,000 patients and HMO members in Texas ... in 1990 out of his own internal medicine practice, he ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016  NOIT™ Research LLC, a ... "Gift of Change" campaign to assist needy families in ... such unit sold between February 10, 2016 and March ... a needy family. The NOIT is an auditory stimulus ... individuals develop language skills. Beth Shier ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016  MiMedx Group, Inc. ... utilizing human amniotic membrane and other birth tissues, human ... to develop and market advanced products and therapies, announced ... Markets, 2016 Global Healthcare Conference in New ... and CEO, Michael J. Senken , Chief Financial ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: