Navigation Links
COPD, even when mild, limits heart function
Date:1/20/2010

A common lung condition, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) diminishes the heart's ability to pump effectively even when the disease has no or mild symptoms, according to research published in the Jan. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The study is the first time researchers have shown strong links between heart function and mild COPD. The research was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.

Researchers have long known that severe cases of COPD have harmful effects on the heart, decreasing its ability to pump blood effectively. The new results suggest that these changes in the heart occur much earlier than previously believed, in mild cases and even before symptoms appear. One in five Americans over the age of 45 has COPD, but as many as half of them may not even be aware of it.

"This study shows that COPD, even in its mildest form, is associated with diminished heart function," said NHLBI Acting Director Susan B. Shurin, M.D. "We now have evidence that the presence of even mild COPD may have important health implications beyond the lungs."

COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, and it is strongly associated with smoking. COPD often involves destruction of lung tissue, called emphysema, as well as narrowed airways, persistent cough, and mucus production, known as chronic obstructive bronchitis. These abnormalities impair the flow of air in the lungs and make breathing more difficult.

Although damage to the airways from COPD is not fully reversible, treatments can substantially improve a patient's daily life. "COPD is one of the big killers in the United States, yet it is unknown to many," said James P. Kiley, Ph.D., director of the NHLBI Division of Lung Diseases. "Unfortunately, many people with COPD don't recognize common symptoms such as having shortness of breath while doing activities they used to be able to do. It's important that we continue to increase awareness of the signs of COPD and available treatments."

Using breathing tests and imaging studies of the chest, researchers measured heart and lung structure and function in 2,816 generally healthy adults (average age of 61 years). Study participants were part of the MESA Lung Study, an extension of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a large, NHLBI-supported study focused on finding early signs of heart, lung, and blood diseases before symptoms appear.

Sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans uncovered mild abnormalities in heart and lung function in many participants. They discovered that the link between lung and heart function was strongest in current smokers, who are at risk for both diseases, and especially in those with emphysema. The findings also appeared, to a lesser extent, in people with mild COPD who had never smoked.

"These results raise the intriguing possibility that treating lung disease may, in the future, improve heart function," said Graham Barr, M.D., Dr. P.H., assistant professor of medicine and epidemiology at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, principal investigator of the MESA Lung Study, and lead author of the paper. "Further research is needed to prove whether treating mild COPD will help the heart work better."

The larger MESA project involves more than 6,000 middle-aged and older men and women from six urban communities across the United States. Participants in MESA come from diverse races and ethnic groups, including African Americans, Latinos, Asians and whites. They have been tracked since enrollment began in 2000.

Because the MESA study population is ethnically mixed and covers a broad age range of apparently healthy people, the results of this study may be widely applicable to the general U.S. population.

The NHLBI also supports a national campaign, COPD Learn More Breathe Better, to help people with COPD and those at risk to become more aware of COPD, get diagnosed early, better understand this disease and live better with it.


'/>"/>

Contact: NHLBI Communications Office
nhlbi_news@nhlbi.nih.gov
301-496-4236
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Over Half of Americans Favor Medical Malpractice Limits According to Poll - NYC Attorney Advises on Constitutional Right to Sue
2. Fast Eating Limits Gut Hormones That Induce Fullness
3. CMS Limits Proposed Medicare Cuts To Radiation Oncology
4. Circle K Aces High Golf Tournament - Furthering Life without Limits for People with Disabilities
5. GSK Limits Medical Education Funding to Independent Programs With Highest Impact on Patient Care
6. Employee Benefits Industry Organizes to Protect Flexible Spending Accounts From Elimination or Contribution Limits
7. OrthoDynamix LLC Launches ArthroSteer(TM): Reaching New Limits in Arthroscopy
8. Deaths, Injuries Increase With Higher Speed Limits
9. Drug Limits Stomach Trouble in Patients Taking Low-Dose Aspirin
10. Ironman Competitor with Diabetes Inspires Individuals with Diabetes to Live Without Limits
11. Supreme Court Rejects Limits on Drug-Injury Lawsuits
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... 2017 , ... International Protein, a company based out of Australia that focuses ... January ECRM trade show in Hilton Head, SC. , International Protein was founded ... a line of products that would elevate her fitness regime. At this ECRM trade ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... ... sugar-free alternative VW+ 002. The drinks have been produced in collaboration with Zlatan ... perform during your workout. , After a successful launch in Sweden last year, ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... 20, 2017 , ... “Code Word: Chocolate Biscuit”: a biographical account following a man who went ... creation of published author, Marlyn Ivey, born in Lynn Haven, Florida and at the age ... at 19 years of age, he joined the Navy and got married right out of ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... ... in Suffolk”: a story of love, secrets, and mystery. “Christmas in Suffolk” is ... works in a daycare and looks for inspiration in the local coffee shop as ... Seymour’s new book is an adventure of love and secrets. , After ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... ... “The Land of More and More”: a brilliant story for children and adults ... and achievable answer. “The Land of More and More” is the creation of published ... Indiana where he works with the children’s ministry department. , Michael says that ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... , Jan. 19, 2017 ViewRay, Inc. ... a federal institution supporting research in Germany ... and patient treatments at the University Clinic Heidelberg as ... The MRIdian Linac program will be headed by ... also heads radiation oncology at the German Cancer Research ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 19, 2017   Science Exchange , the leading ... that the first five replication studies from the ... published in eLife today. Despite intense scrutiny around ... practical evaluation of reproducibility rates that may identify ... other assessments of reproducibility, the results of this ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... , January 19, 2017 ... Option to Address Motor Symptoms and Motor Complications ... ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20151014/276718LOGO) ... , European Neurological Review,2016;11(Suppl. 2): 2-15, http://www.touchneurology.com/articles/safinamide-new-therapeutic-option-address-motor-symptoms-and-motor-complications-mid-late ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: