Navigation Links
CNIO scientists successfully test the first gene therapy against aging-associated decline
Date:5/14/2012

A number of studies have shown that it is possible to lengthen the average life of individuals of many species, including mammals, by acting on specific genes. To date, however, this has meant altering the animals' genes permanently from the embryonic stage an approach impracticable in humans. Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), led by its director Mara Blasco, have proved that mouse lifespan can be extended by the application in adult life of a single treatment acting directly on the animal's genes. And they have done so using gene therapy, a strategy never before employed to combat ageing. The therapy has been found to be safe and effective in mice.

The results are published today in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. The CNIO team, in collaboration with Eduard Ayuso and Ftima Bosch of the Centre of Animal Biotechnology and Gene Therapy at the Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona (UAB), treated adult (one-year-old) and aged (two-year-old) mice, with the gene therapy delivering a "rejuvenating" effect in both cases, according to the authors.

Mice treated at the age of one lived longer by 24% on average, and those treated at the age of two, by 13%. The therapy, furthermore, produced an appreciable improvement in the animals' health, delaying the onset of age-related diseases like osteoporosis and insulin resistance and achieving improved readings on ageing indicators like neuromuscular coordination.

The gene therapy utilised consisted of treating the animals with a DNA-modified virus, the viral genes having been replaced by those of the telomerase enzyme, with a key role in ageing. Telomerase repairs the extremes of chromosomes, known as telomeres, and in doing so slows the cell's and therefore the body's biological clock. When the animal is infected, the virus acts as a vehicle depositing the telomerase gene in the cells.

This study "shows that it is possible to develop a telomerase-based anti-ageing gene therapy without increasing the incidence of cancer", the authors affirm. "Aged organisms accumulate damage in their DNA due to telomere shortening, [this study] finds that a gene therapy based on telomerase production can repair or delay this kind of damage", they add.

'Resetting' the biological clock

Telomeres are the caps that protect the end of chromosomes, but they cannot do so indefinitely: each time the cell divides the telomeres get shorter, until they are so short that they lose all functionality. The cell, as a result, stops dividing and ages or dies. Telomerase gets round this by preventing telomeres from shortening or even rebuilding them. What it does, in essence, is stop or reset the cell's biological clock.

But in most cells the telomerase gene is only active before birth; the cells of an adult organism, with few exceptions, have no telomerase. The exceptions in question are adult stem cells and cancer cells, which divide limitlessly and are therefore immortal in fact several studies have shown that telomerase expression is the key to the immortality of tumour cells.

It is precisely this risk of promoting tumour development that has set back the investigation of telomerase-based anti-ageing therapies.

In 2007, Blasco's group proved that it was feasible to prolong the lives of transgenic mice, whose genome had been permanently altered at the embryonic stage, by causing their cells to express telomerase and, also, extra copies of cancer-resistant genes. These animals live 40% longer than is normal and do not develop cancer.

The mice subjected to the gene therapy now under test are likewise free of cancer. Researchers believe this is because the therapy begins when the animals are adult so do not have time to accumulate sufficient number of aberrant divisions for tumours to appear.

Also important is the kind of virus employed to carry the telomerase gene to the cells. The authors selected demonstrably safe viruses that have been successfully used in gene therapy treatment of haemophilia and eye disease. Specifically, they are non-replicating viruses derived from others that are non-pathogenic in humans.

This study is viewed primarily as "a proof-of-principle that telomerase gene therapy is a feasible and generally safe approach to improve healthspan and treat disorders associated with short telomeres", state Virginia Boccardi (Second University of Naples) and Utz Herbig (New Jersey Medical School-University Hospital Cancer Centre) in a commentary published in the same journal.

Although this therapy may not find application as an anti-ageing treatment in humans, in the short term at least, it could open up a new treatment option for ailments linked with the presence in tissue of abnormally short telomeres, as in some cases of human pulmonary fibrosis.

More healthy years

As Blasco says, "ageing is not currently regarded as a disease, but researchers tend increasingly to view it as the common origin of conditions like insulin resistance or cardiovascular disease, whose incidence rises with age. In treating cell ageing, we could prevent these diseases".

With regard to the therapy under testing, Bosch explains: "Because the vector we use expresses the target gene (telomerase) over a long period, we were able to apply a single treatment. This might be the only practical solution for an anti-ageing therapy, since other strategies would require the drug to be administered over the patient's lifetime, multiplying the risk of adverse effects".


'/>"/>

Contact: Juan J. Gomez
juanj.gomez@cnio.es
34-917-328-000-4060
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists Pinpoint Area of Brain That Fears Losing Money
2. Scientists Discover How HIV Is Transmitted Between Men
3. Prevention Is Key Research Goal for Premature Babies, Scientists Say
4. Scientists Discover Molecular Pathway for Organ Tissue Regeneration and Repair
5. Scientists find donut-shaped structure of enzyme involved in energy metabolism
6. Neuroscientists reveal new links that regulate brain electrical activity
7. Two UCSF Scientists to Receive Prestigious Dementia Research Honor
8. Johns Hopkins scientists develop personalized blood tests for cancer using whole genome sequencing
9. Scientists Spot Genetic Fingerprints of Individual Cancers
10. Scientists Unravel Mysteries of Intelligence
11. MSU scientists develop more effective method of predicting lead-poisoning risk
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
CNIO scientists successfully test the first gene therapy against aging-associated decline
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... ... Digital Scientists, a software innovation lab specializing in web design and ... Carolina location. The lab has set up shop at the renowned NEXT Innovation ... Carolina clients for years from our office here in Atlanta,” explains Digital Scientists’ CEO, ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... Lake Orion, MI (PRWEB) , ... March 24, ... ... providing insurance assistance, financial planning, and related services to families and business owners ... charity initiative aimed at feeding regional families struggling with financial difficulties. , The ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... March 24, 2017 , ... ... on two panels at the Advanced ERISA Benefit Claims Litigation seminar in Chicago, ... Creating the Administrative Record, The majority of cases litigated under ERISA involve claims ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... , ... March 24, 2017 , ... ... first Certified Medical Reiki™ Master in Frederick, MD. Judy says, “I am passionate ... during what is often a very difficult and challenging time.” , A Certified ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... ... Adventures of Joey, The Dog Who Barks at Puddles”: a boisterous story about a ... God intended. “The Adventures of Joey, The Dog Who Barks at Puddles” is the ... writing, especially about truth and human behavior. , Published by Christian Faith Publishing, Patti ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... Tenn. , March 23, 2017  Provectus ... or the "Company"), a clinical-stage oncology and dermatology ... announced Definitive Financing Commitment Term Sheet (the "Definitive ... a group of the Company,s stockholders, who are ... Group" in a Form 8-K filed with the ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 23, 2017 The key factors driving ... diabetic population, accelerating economic growth and increasing healthcare expenditure. Some ... higher life expectancy of ESRD patients, rising demand for home ... the expansion of the market is hindered by high treatment ... ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 23, 2017 As a result of ... the prevalence of allergic diseases, cutting edge developments ... revolutionising the ways in which pharmaceutical and biotech ... promises to be both a high quality meeting ... interest groups, immunologists, research scholars and doctors. The ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: