Navigation Links
Bypass 'Off-Pump' Boosts Women's Outcomes

And another study suggests vitamin E protects their hearts

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Performing coronary bypass procedures without using the heart-lung machine can shrink the gender gap in survival and boost women's outcomes after these procedures, a new study finds.

The bypass results are "good news for women," said Dr. John D. Puskas, the lead author of the study that reviewed more than 11,000 bypass surgeries on men and women at Emory University Heart Center un Atlanta, conducted over more than eight years.

The isolated bypass surgeries studied involved bypass grafts alone rather than multiple types of heart procedures, the researchers noted.

And, in another step forward for women's cardiac care, a new study finds that vitamin E supplements reduces a woman's risk of deep vein and pulmonary thrombosis, according research from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston.

Both studies were published Sept. 10 in the online edition of Circulation.

When surgeons operate off-pump, the heart continues to beat, and it's a "little bit like changing the spark plugs when the engine is running," said Puskas, an associate chief of cardiothoracic surgery at the Atlanta center. It's a newer technique that's not as frequently used elsewhere as it is at Emory, especially among older surgeons who may have developed their expertise using the traditional heart-pump approach, he added.

"We find there are other benefits" to the off-pump surgery such as "lower transfusion requirements, quicker times out of intensive care, quicker times out of the hospital, lower risk of kidney problems," Puskas said.

In the study, women who had bypass surgery at Emory using the traditional heart-lung machine had a 2.5 times greater likelihood of dying than in the "off-pump" mode, Puskas said.

Men also did better with the off-pump technique, but their benefit was of a smaller degree than that seen in women, he said.

Bypass surgeries already have a good record for safety and effectiveness, but if the mortality rate is reduced "by one-third to one-half, we're trying to make something that is very good even better," Puskas said. "Off-pump is a way to do that, especially for women."

The better results for off-pump surgery were not due only to lowered risk factors, Puskas added, because higher risk patients were also done off-pump.

Researchers for years have been trying to figure out why women tend to fare worse after heart surgery compared to men. One explanation was that female patients tended to be older, and their arteries were smaller in size.

The Emory study gets no further at explaining why off-pump surgery made such an improvement, Puskas added.

Last year, a University of Michigan study reported that 96 percent of the gender gap in mortality rates for women and men within 100 days of coronary artery bypass surgery might be explained by higher infection rates in women.

Puskas, however, said that infection rates did not play a role in results of the Emory study.

If the Emory results are replicated in additional studies, "they will change the practice patterns for women going for bypass, so these are highly significant findings," said Dr. Elizabeth Jackson, a cardiologist and assistant professor of medicine at Michigan. The Emory study now raises questions about "what kind of procedures benefit women more than men and vice-versa." added Jackson, who did not play a role in the Michigan infection study.

Another expert believes that women should be careful not to pressure their heart surgeons to do off-pump procedures.

"The surgeon's comfortability comes into play. I think, down the road, more off-pump surgeries will be done on women, but, ultimately, it will be the choice of the surgeon," said Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, director of Women and Heart Disease at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

The difference between cardiovascular disease in women and men also affects venous thromboembolism (blood clots in the veins), said Steinbaum, because women have smaller arteries that can raise bigger problems in terms of blood clots and stroke.

But the new vitamin E study, which comes from an analysis of Women's Health Study data, suggests the supplement might reduce the risk of deep vein or pulmonary blood clots, particularly for women with a prior history or who have genetic mutations that predispose them to these events. The study looked at a decade's worth of data from almost 27,000 U.S. women.

Robert J. Glynn, the study's lead author and an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said his team was "somewhat surprised to find this result" after prior findings that vitamin E did not lower risks for either cardiovascular disease or cancer in the same research subjects.

Jackson said that, pending further research, women at higher risk should not replace current therapies with vitamin E.

More information

There's more on women's heart health at the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: John D. Puskas, M.D., associate chief, cardiothoracic surgery, Emory University, Atlanta; Robert J. Glynn, Ph.D., Sc.D., associate professor, medicine (biostatistics), Harvard Medical School, Boston; Elizabeth Jackson, M.D., assistant professor, medicine, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor; Suzanne Steinbaum, D.O., director, women and heart disease, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Sept. 10, 2007, online edition, Circulation

Copyright©2007 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Bypass Heart Surgery Performed Without General Anesthesia
2. Older Men Surviving Coronary Bypasses
3. Heart bypass-mental decline link
4. Screening bypasses radical breast surgery
5. Bypass Surgery & Pleural Effusion
6. Life after Bypass not so Promising for Women.
7. The Reason For Loss Of Appetite After Gastric Bypass
8. Twisted bypass grafts work better
9. Gastric bypass surgery reduces risk of heart disease
10. Obesity better handled with gastric bypass surgery
11. Bypassing open heart bypass surgery...
Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom preaches the ... In terms of the latter, setting the bar too high can result in disappointment, ... just slow progress toward their goal. , Research from reveals ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... June 19, 2016 is World Sickle Cell Observance Day. ... the benefits of holistic treatments, Serenity Recovery Center of Marne, Michigan, has ... , Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a disorder of the red blood cells, which ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Global law firm Greenberg ... Legal Elite. The attorneys chosen by their peers for this recognition are considered among ... Greenberg Traurig Shareholders received special honors as members of this year’s Legal Elite Hall ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... NY (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Topical BioMedics, Inc, makers of Topricin ... companies that call for a minimum wage raise to $12 an hour by 2020 and ... This will restore the lost value of the minimum wage, assure the wage floor does ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... NY (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... Haute Living, is proud to recognize Dr. Barry M. Weintraub as a prominent ... “the most beautiful women in the world, and the most handsome men, look ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... Mass. , June 24, 2016   Pulmatrix, ... pharmaceutical company developing innovative inhaled drugs, announced today that ... Russell Investments reconstituted its comprehensive set of ... "This is an important milestone for Pulmatrix," ... will increase shareholder awareness of our progress in developing ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... HOUSTON , June 23, 2016  MedSource ... platform as its e-clinical software solution of choice.  ... the best possible value to their clients by ... nowEDC.  The preferred relationship establishes nowEDC as the ... pricing for MedSource,s full-service clients.  "nowEDC has long ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... Chemical (Sugar, Petrochemical, Glycerin), Inorganic Chemical), Functionality (Filler, Binder, ... Forecast to 2021" report to their offering. ... excipients market is projected to reach USD 8.1 Billion ... forecast period 2016 to 2021. The ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: