Navigation Links
Bullying Takes Toll on High School Test Scores
Date:8/8/2011

MONDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Students attending high schools dominated by bullies are more likely to have lower standardized test scores, a new study shows.

In fact, researchers in Virginia found that schoolwide passing rates on three different standardized exams (Algebra I, Earth Science and World History) were 3 percent to 6 percent lower in schools where students reported a more severe bullying climate. The findings, they added, highlight the fact that bullying is a pervasive problem in schools.

"Our study suggests that a bullying climate may play an important role in student test performance," Dewey Cornell, a clinical psychologist and a professor of education at the University of Virginia, said in a news release. "This research underscores the importance of treating bullying as a schoolwide problem rather than just an individual problem."

In conducting the study, researchers compiled surveys about bullying from more than 7,300 ninth graders and about 3,000 teachers at 284 Virginia high schools. The researchers pointed out that even a 3 percent to 6 percent drop in test scores associated with bullying is significant.

Under the federal No Child Left Behind Act, students must receive a passing grade on these standardized tests to graduate. Moreover, in the state of Virginia at least 70 percent of a school's students must pass the tests for the school to keep its state accreditation.

"This difference is substantial because it affects the school's ability to meet federal requirements and the educational success of many students who don't pass the exams," said Cornell. "This study supports the case for school-wide bullying prevention programs as a step to improve school climate and facilitate academic achievement."

The researchers argued the poor academic performance was due to the fact that students are less engaged in learning when they are afraid about bullying. They also suggested bullying leads to a greater level of school disorder, which may have negatively affected test scores.

The study authors noted bullying programs should not only provide help for victims, but also counseling and discipline for bullies. Bystanders, they added, should also be discouraged from supporting bullying.

"We have always had bullying in our schools. What has changed is we have become more aware of bullying due to a series of high-profile tragic cases involving school shootings and suicides," concluded Cornell. "Our society does not permit harassment and abuse of adults in the workplace, and the same protections should be afforded to children in school."

The study was to be presented on Sunday at the American Psychological Association annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics provides more information on bullying.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: American Psychological Association, news release, Aug. 7, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Cyberbullying a Big Worry for Parents: Survey
2. Bullyings Scars May Last a Lifetime, Experts Say
3. School bullying, violence against LGBT youth linked to risk of suicide, HIV infection
4. Student Bullying Linked to Family Violence: CDC
5. Bullying May Accompany Drive to Be Popular
6. For Many Gay Youth, Bullying Exacts a Deadly Toll
7. Bullying Assembly Uses Comedy to Reach Students
8. There Oughta Be A Law: NY Poised to Lead U.S. in Fight to Stop Workplace Bullying
9. Only 17% of Children Trust Dad for Advice About Bullying
10. New study reveals prevalence of cyberbullying and its psychological impact on nonheterosexual youth
11. Writing DNR orders takes longer, death more likely when surrogate decision-maker involved
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Bullying Takes Toll on High School Test Scores
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to a possible lice infestation, as reported ... head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from a human host, and to infest ... in the event that lice have simply gotten out of control. , As lice are ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... On Friday, June 10, Van Mitchell, Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health ... of their exemplary accomplishments in worksite health promotion. , The Wellness at Work Awards ... at the BWI Marriott in Linthicum Heights. iHire was one of 42 businesses to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her son James, eight, was out ... family verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he couldn’t control his emotions,” remembers ... would throw rocks at my other children and say he was going to kill them. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Topical BioMedics, Inc, makers of Topricin and ... that call for a minimum wage raise to $12 an hour by 2020 and then ... will restore the lost value of the minimum wage, assure the wage floor does not ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Strategic Capital Partners, ... economy by obtaining investment capital for emerging technology companies. SCP has delivered ... already resulted in more than a million dollars of capital investment for five ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... Ill. , June 23, 2016  In a startling report ... are failing their residents by lacking a comprehensive, proven plan to ... a definitive ranking of how states are tackling the worst ... to only four states – Kentucky , ... Vermont . Of the 28 failing states, three ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... DUBLIN , June 23, 2016 ... "Key Pharma News Issue 52" report to their offering. ... need in influenza treatment creates a favourable commercial environment for ... and growing patient base that will serve to drive considerable ... flu vaccine would serve to cap sales considerably, but development ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016  Astellas today announced the establishment of Astellas Farma Colombia (AFC), a new affiliate ... in Latin America . ... ... ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: