Navigation Links
Bullying Starts Before School Years Begin, Study Finds
Date:8/25/2014

By
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Aug. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that illustrates the complexity of bullying, Dutch researchers report that obese boys are more likely to bully and be bullied than their thinner peers and the vicious cycle begins before these children ever step foot inside a school.

Past research has shown an association between bullying and weight, but most of those studies focused on older children or teens. The average age of the children in this new study was 6.

"I was very surprised by how young these kids are," said Rachel Annuziato, an assistant professor for clinical psychology at Fordham University in New York City. "I think our understanding of bullying is that it's something that starts a little later cognitively and developmentally, but this suggests that isn't the case. From the day kids walk into school, this is a concern."

She said researchers have typically thought of bullying as a school-based phenomenon in which students learn bullying behavior from other kids. But these findings imply that kids are learning this behavior outside of school.

Annuziato said she also found it interesting that obesity increased the risk of being both a perpetrator and a victim for boys.

"Kids who are being picked on might start to think this is the way to fit in, to pick on other kids," she suggested. "That becomes their way to assert themselves after they've experienced bullying."

The link between being a bully and a victim of bullying may also offer clues to the link between bullying and obesity, said Susan Tortolero, a professor of public health at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston.

"A lot of these risk behaviors may have to do with self-regulation, self-discipline and decision-making, which gets into the executive functioning of the brain," Tortolero said. "It could be that poor coping is going on here, too. They could be expressing aggression because they're being bullied and they don't know how to cope with it or express it."

This possibility was also raised by the researchers, whose earlier work showed that being overweight or obese can lead to social problems among children. Having difficulty managing their emotions might be contributing to both the peer problems and to abnormal eating behaviors, the researchers suggested.

In the new study, more than 1,300 Dutch children and their teachers were surveyed to learn which children were bullies or victims, how often bullying occurred and what form it took: physical (hitting, kicking); verbal (teasing, name-calling); relational (being excluded or shunned); or material (personal items hidden or broken). The children were classified as having a normal weight or being overweight or obese based on their body-mass index, a measurement used to assess a person's healthy weight for their height.

Lead researcher Pauline Jansen and her colleagues at Erasmus University Rotterdam took into account other factors that might increase the risk of bullying or being bullied. Those factors included age, sex, national origin and mother's level of education, as well as whether the child had siblings or lived with a single parent.

The findings were published online Aug. 25 in the journal Pediatrics.

Although the children in the study were from the Netherlands, Tortolero said she would expect to see similar findings among U.S. children.

One way to address bullying behavior is to model healthy social relationships and build children's self-confidence, Tortolero said.

"If your child has a risk factor for kids picking on them, it's really important to give them skills to cope with those things and to build their self-esteem," she said. "If you teach your children to problem-solve and how to make decisions, then they will be more successful."

In addition to addressing the health issue of obesity by helping children make better choices with eating and physical activity, parents can help children find activities and hobbies they excel in, Tortolero said.

More information

Visit the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for more on bullying.

SOURCES; Rachel Annuziato, Ph.D., assistant professor, clinical psychology, Fordham University, New York City; Susan Tortolero, Ph.D., professor, health promotion and behavioral sciences, the Allan King Professor of Public Health and director, Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston; September 2014 Pediatrics


'/>"/>
Copyright©2014 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Building Supportive Relationships to Create a Positive School Climate. Professionals Working with Youth to Stop Bullying are Meeting in San Diego to Make a Difference
2. Study finds online bullying creates off-line fear at school
3. Stigma: At the root of ostracism and bullying
4. Scores of bullying victims bringing weapons to school
5. National Voices for Equality, Education and Enlightenment (NVEEE) to Host 3rd Annual “Not on My Watch” VIP Reception Benefiting Bullying and Suicide Prevention Efforts
6. Dr. Kathy Gohar’s Beverly Hills Spa Helps Suppress The New Wave of Child Bullying Through an Otoplasty Procedure
7. Miami-Based Bullying Prevention Organization Partner with Organization Committed to Lasting Solutions through Communication to Offer Solutions to Miami Dolphins
8. MTV, AP-NORC Center survey finds that online bullying has declined
9. Leading Wilderness Program for Girls Offers Tips to Recognize Signs of Bullying Abuse in Young Girls
10. Bullying Prevention Interview with Birmingham Maple Clinic on FOX 2 News
11. Explosive New Book Aims to Eliminate Bullying
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Bullying Starts Before School Years Begin, Study Finds
(Date:6/25/2016)... Montreal, Canada (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... the pursuit of success. In terms of the latter, setting the bar too high ... low, risk more than just slow progress toward their goal. , Research from ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her son James, eight, was out of ... verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he couldn’t control his emotions,” remembers Marcy. ... throw rocks at my other children and say he was going to kill them. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Comfort Keepers® of San Diego, CA is ... Road To Recovery® program to drive cancer patients to and from their cancer treatments. ... the highest quality of life and ongoing independence. Getting to and from medical ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Haute ... Dr. Barry M. Weintraub as a prominent plastic surgeon and the network’s newest ... world, and the most handsome men, look naturally attractive. Plastic surgery should be ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Venture Construction Group (VCG) sponsors Luke’s Wings 5th ... Woodmont Country Club at 1201 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland, 20852. The event raised ... have been wounded in battle and their families. Venture Construction Group is a 2016 ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... Any dentist who has made an implant supported ... Many of them do not even offer this as a ... laboratory costs involved. And those who ARE able to offer ... high cost that the majority of today,s patients would not ... Zadeh , founder of Dental Evolutions Inc. and inventor of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016  In a startling report released today, ... their residents by lacking a comprehensive, proven plan to eliminate prescription ... definitive ranking of how states are tackling the worst drug crisis ... four states – Kentucky , New ... Vermont . Of the 28 failing states, three – ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the ... 2016 - Forecast to 2022" report to their offering. ... up to date financial data derived from varied research sources ... with potential impact on the market during the next five ... comprises of sub markets, regional and country level analysis. The ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: