Navigation Links
Breast cancer screening may lower mortality and disease burden in India
Date:9/9/2008

Regular screening of women between the ages of 40 and 59 could substantially reduce breast cancer mortality in India, according to a study in the September 9 online issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Breast cancer screening programs are regularly used in developed countries where the incidence of breast cancer is highest, and an extensive health care system is in place. The value and practicality of such screening programs in the developing world is less clear. Although the developing world has a lower breast cancer incidence rate, women tend to have more advanced disease at diagnosis and a greater risk of dying from their disease.

To estimate the ability of screening in a developing country to reduce the number of deaths and the stage of disease at diagnosis, Harry J. de Koning, M.D., Ph.D., of Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, and colleagues used a Microsimulation Screening Analysis model to estimate the impact of screening with clinical breast exams or mammography in India. The researchers estimated the cost-effectiveness, which is the cost of screening per life year gained, for each screening approach in international dollars (Int$), which are used by the World Health Organization and has the same purchasing power in India as a U.S. dollar does in the United States.

A single clinical breast exam for women at age 50 was estimated to reduce breast cancer mortality by 2 percent at a cost-effectiveness of Int$793 per life-year gained. If women had clinical breast exams every five years between the ages of 40 and 60, mortality reduction would increase to 8.2 percent and the cost-effectiveness would grow to Int$l,l35 per life-year gained. The investigators estimated that annual screening with clinical breast exams would lead to nearly the same mortality reduction as biennial mammography screening but at half the net cost.

"Our results indicate that every-5-year, biennial, and annual [clinical breast exams] for women aged 40-60 all lead to considerable reductions in mortality and high numbers of life years gained," the authors write. However, India and other developing countries have significant competing demands for their health care resources. Therefore, even though the breast cancer rate is increasing substantially in the developing world, implementation of a screening program is likely to be challenging.

In an accompanying editorial, Sue Moss, Ph.D., of the Institute of Cancer Research in Surrey, UK, cautions that although studies show that mammography screening can reduce breast cancer mortality, no such data exists for clinical breast exams. "Potential barriers to effective screening also include lack of necessary infrastructure and sociocultural influences on compliance," she writes. "For screening to succeed, a high level of compliance is necessary, not only with initial screening but also with referral for further investigation in those screened positive, and with treatment in those with confirmed diagnosis." Trials in the developing world indicate that this may be difficult.

A key benefit of a screening program may be to improve the overall quality of care, according to the editorialist, "but whether screening is the best means of achieving these important aims needs further exploration."


'/>"/>

Contact: Liz Savage
jncimedia@oxfordjournals.org
301-841-1287
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Eating fish while pregnant, longer breastfeeding, lead to better infant development
2. Formula Samples Hinder Breast-Feeding Efforts
3. Yoplait(R) Celebrates 10th Anniversary of Save Lids to Save Lives(R) and Sustained Commitment to Fight Against Breast Cancer
4. Drug Re-Sensitizes Breast Tumors to Treatment
5. Breast Cancer Drug Not Tied to Cognitive Decline: Study
6. Hospitals provide formula sample packs while medical organizations encourage breastfeeding
7. Komen Travels to Republican Convention to Raise Awareness of Breast Cancer Issues
8. Superbug breast infections controllable in nursing mothers, UT Southwestern researchers find
9. Komen Travels to Democratic Convention in Denver to Raise Awareness of Breast Cancer Issues
10. Taking Codeine While Breast-Feeding May Harm Infant
11. Breastfeeding, other factors may affect risk of breast cancer type
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... , ... Delta Dental of California and its affiliated companies announced today that ... who recently retired as president and CEO of Delta Dental of California and its ... Year , helped lead the effort to raise funds for studies to strengthen pancreatic ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... Discover the Rocky Mountain region’s ... booths and 700 companies. Attendees also get to see the most incredible gardens ... & Home Show , at the Colorado Convention Center - 700 14th St. Denver ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Vegas, NV (PRWEB) , ... February 08, 2016 , ... ... on February 9th, 10th and 11th, 2016 in honor of his birthday on February ... and true happiness. Mahendra Trivedi is known by over 250,000 people from over ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) , ... February 07, 2016 ... ... its new MyDecision™ program. MyDecision™ empowers employers and organizations with the tools and ... , MyDecision™ combines three elements to cut the cost of providing employee healthcare ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... , ... Shark Finds and Kevin Harrington, along with the Product ... with Belly Bands. , Having a dog is great—except when it wets every couch, ... nothing works, get Belly Bands, the easiest way to stop dogs from wetting ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... ISELIN, N.J. , Feb. 8, 2016 ... ), a medical device company focused on ... technologies, today announced today announced that it ... on Wednesday, February 17, 2015 at 9:00 ... and to discuss its corporate strategy, advancements ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , Feb. 8, 2016 In a historic vote among ... plans to construct a medical cannabis cultivation facility and dispensary on tribal ... of New York as a provider for patients in the ... York as a provider for patients in the state,s Medical ... 29% (34) to approve the project and pursue designation from the ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Switzerland and PALO ALTO, Calif. , Feb. ... and chemical manufacturing, and Kodiak Sciences Inc., a biopharmaceutical ... of retinal disease, announced today agreements for the clinical ... will manufacture material at multiple sites, including Slough (UK), ... --> --> Retinal diseases, such as ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: