Navigation Links
Breast cancer patients experience fewer side effects from anticancer drug
Date:12/23/2013

A new analysis has found that both real and sham acupuncture treatments may help alleviate side effects of drugs commonly used to treat breast cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may help clinicians improve care for cancer patients. The results also raise the question of whether sham acupuncture is truly inert or may, like real acupuncture, have beneficial effects.

Breast cancer patients who take a type of drug called an aromatase inhibitor (which inhibits the enzyme that produces estrogen in postmenopausal women) often experience side effects, including joint/muscle pain and stiffness, and menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes. To see if acupuncture could help alleviate patients' symptoms, Ting Bao MD, DAMBA, MS, of the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center in Baltimore, and her colleagues recruited 47 breast cancer survivors taking aromatase inhibitors and suffering from joint/muscle discomfort to participate in a clinical trial. About half of the patients received eight weekly acupuncture treatments, and the other half received a kind of fake (or "sham") acupuncture that involved non-penetrating retractable needles placed in sham acupoints (non-acupuncture points).

Both groups experienced lessening of their symptoms, especially hot flashes, but there was little difference in benefits between the real acupuncture and the sham acupuncture. "It could be that there is no difference, or it could be that in this small trial we just didn't have enough patients to detect a significant difference," said Dr. Bao. Notably, no patients experienced any significant side effects from either type of acupuncture treatment. "This is important because other treatments for symptoms often do have side effects, so showing that this treatment works without side effects could be a big improvement in the treatment of cancer survivors," explained Dr. Bao.

Although the researchers did not plan to look at racial differences, after the trial was completed they found that women who were African American experienced a greater reduction in the severity and frequency of hot flashes if they had real acupuncture rather than sham acupuncture when compared to non-African American women. "This kind of result is not definitive, but it does suggest that we should probably look further into the possibility that acupuncture may work better in some ethnicity groups than others," said Dr. Bao.


'/>"/>

Contact: Amy Molnar
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-8844
Wiley
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Eliminating the good cholesterol receptor may fight breast cancer
2. Veggies Like Broccoli, Cabbage May Help Fight Breast Cancer: Study
3. Researchers develop a new cell and animal model of inflammatory breast cancer
4. Scientists uncover multiple faces of deadly breast cancer
5. Depo-Provera Birth Control Might Raise Breast Cancer Risk
6. Routine mammograms may result in significant overdiagnosis of invasive breast cancer
7. Mayo Clinic launches whole genome breast cancer study
8. Breast cancer patients suffer treatment-related side effects long after completing care
9. Teen Drinking May Boost Odds of Precancerous Breast Changes
10. Stress contributes to cognitive declines in women with breast cancer, researcher says
11. Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects May Last for Years
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/24/2017)... Hatboro, Pennsylvania (PRWEB) , ... March 24, 2017 ... ... and recycling solutions for contaminated soil, dredged material, and hazardous and non-hazardous materials ... headquartered in Allentown, Pennsylvania. This acquisition will add four additional processing facilities ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... Mediaplanet today announces distribution of ... current obstacles facing infection prevention and offer strategies for the health care community ... , The print component of “Fighting Infection” is distributed within the Friday, ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... 24, 2017 , ... Digital Scientists, a software innovation lab specializing in web ... Greenville, South Carolina location. The lab has set up shop at the ... working with South Carolina clients for years from our office here in Atlanta,” explains ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... ... According to a new study by NCPA Senior Fellow John R. Graham, ... Congress has directed the CBO to follow. The CBO itself previously recognized Obamacare would ... estimates a reduction in employer-based coverage due to the GOP reform, which is not ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 24, 2017 , ... The iaedp ... and other medical professionals caring for those suffering from the full spectrum of disordered ... 800, as eating disorders professionals from nearly all 50 states and several countries converged ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/27/2017)... FinancialBuzz.com News Commentary  ... a new report by Arcview Market Research, the legal cannabis consumer spending ... billion and can be expected to grow at a 27 percent compound ... billion in 2016, to $22.6 billion in 2021. This more than tripled ... a doctor,s recommendation. Voters in California , ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... 27, 2017   Pulmatrix, Inc . (NASDAQ: PULM), a ... serious pulmonary diseases, today announced that it has added two ... and asthma to its Scientific Advisory Board . ... Richard B. Moss , MD, former chief of the Pediatric ... Fibrosis Center at Stanford University, and ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... SAN FRANCISCO , March 27, 2017 ...  is expected to reach USD 16.0 billion by 2025, ... Inc. The growing prevalence of chronic diseases is anticipated ... clinical chemistry analyzers, which thereby widens the scope for ... of geriatric and bariatric population, which is highly susceptible ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: