Navigation Links
Breakthroughs in nanotechnology on edge of 'knowledge frontier'

COLUMBIA, Mo. University of Missouri scientist Kattesh Katti recently discovered how to make gold nanoparticles using gold salts, soybeans and water. Kattis research has garnered attention worldwide and the environmentally-friendly discovery could have major applications in several disciplines.

Gold nanoparticles are tiny pieces of gold, so small they cannot be seen by the naked eye. Researchers believe gold nanoparticles will be used in cancer detection and treatment, the production of smart electronic devices, the treatment of certain genetic eye diseases and the development of green automobiles.

While the nanotechnology industry is expected to produce large quantities of nanoparticles in the near future, researchers have been worried about the environmental impact of typical production methods. Commonly, nanoparticles have been produced using synthetic chemicals. Kattis process, which uses only naturally occurring elements, could have major environmental implications for the future. Since some of the chemicals currently used to make nanoparticles are toxic to humans, Kattis discovery also could open doors for additional medical fields. Having a 100-percent natural green process could allow medical researchers to expand the use of the nanoparticles.

Typically, a producer must use a variety of synthetic or man-made chemicals to produce gold nanoparticles, said Katti, professor of radiology and physics in the School of Medicine and College of Arts and Science at MU, senior research scientist at the MU Research Reactor (MURR) and director of the University of Missouri Cancer Nanotechnology Platform. To make the chemicals necessary for production, you need to have other artificial chemicals produced, creating an even larger, negative environmental impact. Our new process only takes what nature has made available to us and uses that to produce a technology already proven to have far-reaching impacts in technology and medicine.

The new discovery has created a large positive response in the scientific community. Researchers from as far away as Germany have commented on the discoverys importance and the impact it will have in the future.

Dr. Kattis discovery sets up the beginning of a new knowledge frontier that interfaces plant science, chemistry and nanotechnology, said Herbert W. Roesky, a professor and world-renowned chemist from the University of Goettingen in Germany.

Katti and his long-time collaborator and colleague, Raghuraman Kannan, assistant professor of radiology, sowed the seeds of Nanomedicine at MU through their groundbreaking discoveries in 2004. MU now has an internationally recognized research program in nanomedicine. The research was funded by grants from the National Cancer Institute and the National Institutes of Health.

Kattis research in the field of nanomedicine, biomedicine, cancer diagnostics/therapeutics and optical imaging have earned him numerous awards and recognition. The latest honor bestowed upon Katti is the Outstanding Missourian award, which he will receive Tuesday, March 4 in Jefferson City. The award is presented as acknowledgement of the most accomplished citizens of the state of Missouri and for making an outstanding contribution to his state or nation. He is scheduled to receive the award at the beginning of the morning session of the Missouri House of Representatives.

In a recent interview, he expressed his gratefulness for the recognition, but attributes much of the credit to others, including his wife, Kavita Katti, who is a senior research chemist at MU, and his parents in India who supported him in his education.

I feel excited about the recognition, and I attribute my selection to our institution, my research group and my collaborators, Katti said. This award is the culmination of several factors, including departmental leadership, a plethora of outstanding collaborators at MU, the deans and, of course, the chancellor. A faculty member could not possibly succeed just by his or her own efforts. We have been very blessed with this team effort. I am very excited to receive this recognition. I think it speaks highly of our school and of our nanomedicine program.


Contact: Bryan E. Jones
University of Missouri-Columbia

Related medicine news :

1. Physics breakthroughs on tap at New Orleans conference
2. TIME Magazine Names GeneSearch(TM) One of the Top 10 Medical Breakthroughs in 2007
3. New Round of Lupus Research Institute Awards Brings Promise of More Breakthroughs
4. Federal toxics disclosure law could help inform public of nanotechnology risks
5. Cleaner water through nanotechnology
6. Nanotechnologys future depends on who the public trusts
7. UCLA-industry partnership to develop, commercialize new nanotechnology
8. Food and Drug Law Institute, Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies Co-Sponsor Major Conference on Nanotechnology Law, Regulation and Policy
9. Nanotechnology: not just for geeks
10. Old dogs: Prior knowledge affects how consumers accept new information
11. Parents Identify Health Topics They Want Doctors to Discuss with Kids - New Research for University of Michigan Conducted by Knowledge Networks
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/12/2015)... , ... October 12, 2015 , ... Advera Health ... no charge to qualified Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) in order to provide health plans, ... into their decision making process. In addition, the DSM is also being offered to ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... October 12, 2015 , ... To ... announced its charitable donation to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. The National Breast ... by breast cancer through early detection, education, and support services. , The annual ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... ... Clara dentist , Dr. Alan Frame, shares his insight on today’s dental hygiene and the ... “I want each one of my patients to be at their optimum level of health, ... implants dentist , Dr. Frame. He mentions, "As the white paper mentions, oral health care ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... October 12, 2015 , ... ... receive a Eugene Washington Engagement Award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) ... the research community. , The project, entitled “Training Patients with Asthma to ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... October 12, 2015 , ... ... secured a new corporate headquarters, located at 485 Madison Avenue, New York, NY ... and increased emphasis on cloud-based technology. , “Care to Care is a dynamic ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2015)... the United States . By early next year, ... the United States . By early next year, ... The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Elekta and ... Tesla) MRI-guided linear accelerator in the United States ... a non-clinical capacity. Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... -- Use this report to: - Learn ... the medical membrane devices market. - Analyze the present ... medical membrane devices market including hemodialyzers, membrane oxygenators, intravenous ... devices. - Gain information on newly approved products, recalls ... Use this report to: - Learn about the performance, ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... CRANBURY, N.J. , Oct. 12, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... that a securities fraud class action complaint was ... of New Jersey.  The complaint alleges that officers and ... Securities Exchange Act of 1934 between September 15, 2015 ... misleading statements about Amicus Therapeutics, business prospects.  Amicus is ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: