Navigation Links
Brain Scans Using New Dye May Predict Alzheimer's

WEDNESDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Brain scans using a new radioactive dye can detect early evidence of Alzheimer's disease in people who show little or no signs of the disease and may help predict future mental decline, a new study says.

It included 151 people who completed thinking and memory tests and underwent a PET (positron emission tomography) brain scan with the new dye called florbetapir (Amyvid). They were then followed for three years.

The dye binds to amyloid plaques that occur in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, enabling doctors to see if patients have the plaques and how much.

At the start of the study, 69 patients had normal mental function, 51 had mild impairment and 31 had Alzheimer's disease.

After 18 months, thinking and memory test results of patients who started off with mild impairment and whose brain scans revealed evidence of amyloid plaques worsened to a greater degree than those who had mild impairment but had no evidence of plaques at the start of the study.

The patients with amyloid plaques at the outset were also more likely to go on to develop Alzheimer's. After three years, 29 percent of the plaque-positive patients with mild impairment developed Alzheimer's compared with 10 percent of those with mild impairment who had no plaques at the start of the study.

Among participants with normal mental function at the start of the study, those with evidence of brain plaques showed more mental decline after 18 months than those with no sign of plaques.

"Even at a short follow-up of 18 months we can see how the presence of amyloid plaques affects cognitive [thinking] function," study co-leader Dr. P. Murali Doraiswamy, a professor of psychiatry at Duke University, said in a university news release. "Most people who come to the doctor with mild impairment really want to know the short-term prognosis and potential long-term effect."

There is no cure for Alzheimer's, but being able to detect the early stages of Alzheimer's could help advance efforts to find ways to fight the disease and enhance the care and treatment of current patients, he explained.

"For the most part we have been blind about who would progress and who wouldn't, so this approach is a step toward having a biomarker that predicts risk of decline in people who are experiencing cognitive impairment," Doraiswamy said.

The study, published online July 11 in the journal Neurology, was funded by Eli Lilly/Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, which markets Amyvid. Doraiswamy receives advisory and speaker fees from Lilly/Avid.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Amyvid was approved in April for use in imaging tests for patients being evaluated for Alzheimer's.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about Alzheimer's disease.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Duke University, news release, July 11, 2012

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Study Suggests Vaccine May Help Kids With Brain Cancer
2. Epilepsy Leads to More Brain Abnormalities Over Time
3. UCLA Brain Injury Research Center gets NCAA funding for research on sports concussions
4. Why is traumatic brain injury increasing among the elderly?
5. Brain Falters Near End of Life, but Games, Puzzles Might Slow Decline
6. Dental X-Rays May Be Linked to Benign Brain Tumors
7. Nonsurgical Method to Measure Brain Pressure Shows Promise
8. Researchers Map Brain Regions Linked to Intelligence
9. Football-related catastrophic brain injuries on the rise
10. Brain Tumor Vaccine Shows Promise in Early Trial
11. Brain Surgery Might Ease Tough-to-Treat OCD
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Apple Rehab Shelton Lakes , which specializes ... of the facility as part of a disaster drill on October 3rd. , Apple ... Shelton City Emergency Manager, as well as the Connecticut Long Term Care Mutual ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House of Yahweh, ... and least understood books in the Holy Scriptures, Revelation. The Book of Revelation paints ... for centuries. Many have tossed it off as mere rubbish, but Yisrayl Hawkins says ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... WILMINGTON, Del. (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 ... ... technology and advisory services for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range ... and National Association for Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... ... The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) will present the 2017 Morris F. ... AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. AMIA’s Annual Symposium is taking place ... the field of medical informatics, this prestigious award is presented to an individual whose ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Leading pediatric oncology experts at Children’s National Health System ... Congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) Oct. 12-15. Chaired by ... and Blood Disorders at Children’s National, and Stephen P. Hunger, M.D., Chief of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/2/2017)... , Oct. 2, 2017  AllianceRx Walgreens Prime, ... formed by Walgreens and pharmacy benefit manager Prime Therapeutics ... new brand, which included the unveiling of new signage ... , as well as at a few other company-owned ... new brand to patients, some of whom will begin ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... , Oct. 2, 2017 The Rebound mobile ... the struggle to reverse the tide of prescription drug addiction. ... regulating their medicine intake and stepping down their dosage in ... to launch in December 2017; the first 100,000 people to ... more at ...
(Date:9/28/2017)... Cohen Veterans Bioscience and Early Signal Foundation ... and home sensors for real-time monitoring of patients with ... nonprofit organization focused on disruptive health solutions for rare ... system to record and integrate behavioral, cognitive, physiological and ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: