Navigation Links
Brain MRI in children: 'Incidental' findings yield disclosure dilemmas for doctors, patients
Date:6/14/2010

Pediatricians whose patients undergo "routine" brain MRIs need a plan to deal with findings that commonly reveal unexpected-but-benign anomalies that are unlikely to cause any problem, reports a research team led by Johns Hopkins Children's Center investigators.

"Doctors need to figure out what, if anything, they want to share with patients about such findings because they seldom require urgent follow-up," says senior investigator John Strouse, M.D., Ph.D., a hematologist at Hopkins Children's.

In a report published online June 14 in the journal Pediatrics, Strouse and team describe the results of what they believe is the largest study to date of the frequency and type of unexpected brain findings in children who get MRI tests for reasons unrelated to these benign anomalies.

The most common reasons for MRI testing in children are seizures and headaches or as a prerequisite for enrolling in certain studies. The patients in the Hopkins study, all of whom had sickle cell disease and were predominantly African-American, had brain MRIs before enrolling in a research study about their condition. The investigators emphasize that none of the brain anomalies discovered in the study were related to the patients' underlying condition, meaning the findings may apply to healthy children in general.

Of the 953 children, ages 5 to 14, in the study, 63 (6.6 percent) had a total of 68 abnormal brain findings. None of the children required emergency treatment or follow-up, and only six children (0.6 percent) needed urgent follow-ups. The urgent findings involved changes suggestive of slow-growing tumors and a structural defect called Chiari malformation type 1, in which brain tissue extends into the spinal canal. None of the six children with urgent findings had any clinical symptoms suggestive of the anomalies.

Because stumbling upon such unexpected findings especially ones of unclear clinical importance can lead to more, often unnecessary, tests and fear, the Hopkins study highlights the need for pediatricians to prepare for such discussions, Strouse says. And in the absence of guidelines on how to deal with such findings, many pediatricians, Strouse adds, feel so unprepared that they may forego the discussion altogether and simply refer the patient to a neurologist or a neurosurgeon for consultation.

"Helpful as it is, imaging technology can open a Pandora's box, sometimes showing us things we didn't expect to see and are not sure how to interpret," says lead investigator Lori Jordan, M.D., Ph.D., a pediatric neurologist at Hopkins Children's.


'/>"/>

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-516-4996
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. NYUs Movshon receives Champalimaud Vision Award for work on how brain reconstructs images
2. FDA approves first human neural stem cell clinical trial to treat brain tumors
3. Protein lets brain repair damage from multiple sclerosis, other disorders
4. Targeted Therapy Shows Promise Against Deadly Brain Cancer
5. Adolescent brains biologically wired to engage in risky behavior, study finds
6. Brain Volume Lost to Anorexia Reversible
7. Deep Brain Stimulation Works in Two Sites for Parkinsons Disease
8. Molecular Signatures in Post-Mortem Brain Tissue of Younger Individuals at High Risk for Alzheimer's Disease
9. Childhood Brain Tumors May Respond to Measles Virus
10. Cold sore virus may contribute to cognitive and brain abnormalities in schizophrenia
11. Martek Biosciences and the National Center for Creative Aging Introduce New Brain Health Awareness Campaign, "Beautiful Minds: Finding Your Lifelong Potential"
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... February 06, 2016 , ... With the FCPX LUT: Summer ... to their footage. A LUT is a Lookup Table that contains a mathematical formula ... indicated by the table. By manipulating each pixel, LUT's can change each color range ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... , ... February 06, 2016 , ... ... of eating disorder treatment helps to reduce the frequency and level of relapse. ... Recovery Phase: Re-Establishing Healthy Identity and Purpose,” will explore the critical tasks of ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... , ... Love is in the air at King Kullen! The local grocer ... This staple for Valentine’s Day is a must-have, and can be picked up with ... only are long-stem roses available, but also other flower bouquets, elegantly wrapped and ready ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Today, the Whole-Food Warrior ... that the much-anticipated feature with author Jahnavi Foster, specialist in healthy vegetarian cuisine, will ... , Each week, on his weekly Whole-Food Warrior TV show, Frank Davis highlights Whole-Food ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 05, 2016 , ... The event is being held on April 7, 2016 ... Minn. Triumph Over Parkinson’s will fund nearly $100,000 for research for the care and ... Parkinson’s disease and is the architect of this informative event to raise awareness and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... 2016  The Senior Care Pharmacy Coalition (SCPC) ... Chairman Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) and Ranking ... hearing , "Developments in the Prescription Drug Market," ... questions about abusive pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) pricing ... Ranking Member Elijah Cummings (D-MD) are diligent, serious ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... , Feb. 4, 2016  Montoya Love is recognized ... the field of Pharmaceuticals. Montoya is the Regulatory Systems ... Manufacturing and selling ... Becton Dickinson provides healthcare institutions, clinical laboratories and ... fifty countries across the globe. ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... -- Mettler-Toledo International Inc. (NYSE: MTD ) today ... the highlights: , Sales in local currency ... year.  Reported sales decreased 3% as currency reduced sales ... earnings per diluted share as reported (EPS) were $4.44, ... EPS was $4.65, an increase of 10% over the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: