Navigation Links
Brain MRI in children: 'Incidental' findings yield disclosure dilemmas for doctors, patients
Date:6/14/2010

Pediatricians whose patients undergo "routine" brain MRIs need a plan to deal with findings that commonly reveal unexpected-but-benign anomalies that are unlikely to cause any problem, reports a research team led by Johns Hopkins Children's Center investigators.

"Doctors need to figure out what, if anything, they want to share with patients about such findings because they seldom require urgent follow-up," says senior investigator John Strouse, M.D., Ph.D., a hematologist at Hopkins Children's.

In a report published online June 14 in the journal Pediatrics, Strouse and team describe the results of what they believe is the largest study to date of the frequency and type of unexpected brain findings in children who get MRI tests for reasons unrelated to these benign anomalies.

The most common reasons for MRI testing in children are seizures and headaches or as a prerequisite for enrolling in certain studies. The patients in the Hopkins study, all of whom had sickle cell disease and were predominantly African-American, had brain MRIs before enrolling in a research study about their condition. The investigators emphasize that none of the brain anomalies discovered in the study were related to the patients' underlying condition, meaning the findings may apply to healthy children in general.

Of the 953 children, ages 5 to 14, in the study, 63 (6.6 percent) had a total of 68 abnormal brain findings. None of the children required emergency treatment or follow-up, and only six children (0.6 percent) needed urgent follow-ups. The urgent findings involved changes suggestive of slow-growing tumors and a structural defect called Chiari malformation type 1, in which brain tissue extends into the spinal canal. None of the six children with urgent findings had any clinical symptoms suggestive of the anomalies.

Because stumbling upon such unexpected findings especially ones of unclear clinical importance can lead to more, often unnecessary, tests and fear, the Hopkins study highlights the need for pediatricians to prepare for such discussions, Strouse says. And in the absence of guidelines on how to deal with such findings, many pediatricians, Strouse adds, feel so unprepared that they may forego the discussion altogether and simply refer the patient to a neurologist or a neurosurgeon for consultation.

"Helpful as it is, imaging technology can open a Pandora's box, sometimes showing us things we didn't expect to see and are not sure how to interpret," says lead investigator Lori Jordan, M.D., Ph.D., a pediatric neurologist at Hopkins Children's.


'/>"/>

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-516-4996
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. NYUs Movshon receives Champalimaud Vision Award for work on how brain reconstructs images
2. FDA approves first human neural stem cell clinical trial to treat brain tumors
3. Protein lets brain repair damage from multiple sclerosis, other disorders
4. Targeted Therapy Shows Promise Against Deadly Brain Cancer
5. Adolescent brains biologically wired to engage in risky behavior, study finds
6. Brain Volume Lost to Anorexia Reversible
7. Deep Brain Stimulation Works in Two Sites for Parkinsons Disease
8. Molecular Signatures in Post-Mortem Brain Tissue of Younger Individuals at High Risk for Alzheimer's Disease
9. Childhood Brain Tumors May Respond to Measles Virus
10. Cold sore virus may contribute to cognitive and brain abnormalities in schizophrenia
11. Martek Biosciences and the National Center for Creative Aging Introduce New Brain Health Awareness Campaign, "Beautiful Minds: Finding Your Lifelong Potential"
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... Coveros, a leader in agile coaching ... contract by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The Enterprise Agile ... of Agile methodologies in a consistent and high value manner across CMS programs. ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... sleep apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As many as 18 ... characterized by frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can offer significant relief to ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... , ... The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) will present the 2017 ... Session of AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. AMIA’s Annual Symposium is ... pioneer in the field of medical informatics, this prestigious award is presented to an ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... HMP , a leader ... a 2017 Folio Magazine Eddie Digital Award for ‘Best B-to-B Healthcare Website.’ Winners were ... 11, 2017. , The annual award competition recognizes editorial and design excellence across a ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Health Literacy Innovations ... literacy software tool, and the Cancer Patient Education Network (CPEN), an independent professional ... announce a new strategic alliance. , As CPEN’s strategic partner, HLI will ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/28/2017)... Sept. 28, 2017 Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: ... conference call and webcast on Friday, November 3, 2017, ... and ending at approximately 8:30 a.m. (CDT) / 9:30 ... company,s 2017 financial performance and guidance for 2018, Hill-Rom ... to enhance operational performance, and long-range financial outlook through ...
(Date:9/25/2017)...   Montrium , an industry leader in ... IQPC Trial Master Files & Inspection Readiness Conference ... Clinical Services has selected eTMF Connect ... EastHORN, a leading European contract research organization (CRO), ... to enable greater collaboration with sponsors, improve compliance ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... , Sept. 22, 2017 AVACEN Medical (AVACEN) ... is now successfully helping those with the widespread pain ... Fibromyalgia diagnosed Amanda in Essex, England ... washing my hair, experiencing no sleep at all, tremendous ... spasm… I cannot recommend [the AVACEN 100] enough, how ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: