Navigation Links
Brain Lesions Predict MS Progression
Date:8/28/2007

Finding could lead to better diagnoses and therapies, researchers say

TUESDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Certain types of lesions on the brains of multiple sclerosis patients may help predict the severity of disease progression and the accompanying disability, researchers are reporting.

"This is a new way to try to understand what is changing in the tissue of the patient's lesions," said lead researcher Dr. Rohit Bakshi, associate professor of neurology and radiology at Harvard Medical School and director of Clinical MS-MRI at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Partners MS Center, in Boston.

The new findings, based on magnetic resonance images of the brain, may help doctors both diagnose multiple sclerosis more accurately and identify patients at greater risk for disease progression and disability, said Bakshi, a neurologist and neuroimager and senior author of the study, published in the September issue of the journal Radiology.

"The standard MRI measurements are poor at telling us how severe the disease is and telling us how patients are likely to do several years later, how the disease is going to progress and respond to therapy," Bakshi said.

Bakshi and his colleagues used an MRI image called a T1-weighted image and found that specific lesions on that image seemed to predict how severe the disease would get.

"The type of lesions we are describing are relatively new," he said. "Called T1 hyperintense lesions, they look bright when you look at the image." They are different than the lesions known as T2 hyperintense lesions, he said.

MS affects about 400,000 people in the United States, most of them women between the ages of 20 and 50, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society estimates. The disease is chronic and marked by the destruction of myelin, the protective layer surrounding the body's nerve cells. As the disease progresses, it can affect many bodily functions and can result in visual and speech problems, memory loss, muscle weakness, loss of coordination and other problems.

"This is the first time that hyperintense T1 lesions have been correlated with the progression of disease," Bakshi said.

The two most common types of multiple sclerosis are called relapsing-remitting and secondary-progressive disease. People with relapsing-remitting MS have flare-ups of symptoms, followed by periods when the disease does not worsen. Those with secondary-progressive MS have a period of relapsing-remitting disease and then get steadily worse.

In the study, Bakshi reviewed the T1 MRI data of 145 patients, 112 women and 33 men. Of those, 92 had relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, 49 had secondary-progressive MS, and the status of four patients wasn't known.

The researchers found 340 T1 hyperintense lesions in 123 patients. These lesions were more likely to be found in patients with secondary-progressive disease. The researchers also found that 71percent of those with secondary-progressive MS had multiple T1 lesions, but just 46 percent of the relapsing-remitting patients did.

The more T1 hyperintense lesions a person had, the more likely they were to be physically disabled, to have disease progression and to have brain atrophy, another marker of the disease.

"Seventy-eight percent of the patients had at least one T1 hyperintense lesion," Bakshi said. "The average number was three per patient."

While researchers have known about hyperintense T1 lesions for years, it is understandable that it has taken a while to find the link between them and disease status, Bakshi said. "The hyper-intensity is not very obvious to the casual observer, so finding it is subtle. Unless you have a trained eye, you will miss it."

Bakshi concluded: "Patients who have a more severe form of MS have a median number of three [hyperintense T1 lesions]; the relapsing-remitting patients have only one."

Dr. John Richert, executive vice president for research and clinical programs at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, praised the study findings and said they could prove useful. "To my knowledge, this is the first time anyone has made this correlation," he said.

"The correlation was modest, but it was there," he added, and needs to be replicated by other groups of researchers, just as all scientific research should.

"This is potentially important, because it will stimulate more research into what it [the hyperintense lesion] actually represents in the damaged tissue," Richert said.

Tracking the lesions may also turn out to be useful when evaluating new drugs for MS, he said.

More information

To learn more about MRIs, visit the American College of Radiology.



SOURCES: Rohit Bakshi, M.D., associate professor of neurology and radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston; John Richert, M.D., neurologist and executive vice president for research and clinical programs, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, New York City; September 2007, Radiology


'/>"/>
Copyright©2007 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Use of Cellular Phones associated with Increased risk of Brain Tumors
2. Brain death – How to cope with it
3. Multi billion-dollar suit filed against cell phone firm for causing brain tumours
4. “Brain fingerprinting”- The new lie detectr
5. Nasal Spray Could Take Drugs Direct to Brain.
6. Two doctors suspended for wrong brain surgery
7. The brain loves a surprise
8. Virus Combats Brain Tumour
9. Increase in sugar...decrease in brain function!!!
10. Alcohol shrinks brain
11. Roller coaster takes brain for a big ride!!
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/23/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... May 23, 2017 , ... London, ... was honored to serve earlier this month as a Guest Speaker and Contributor to ... British Royal Family and Common Purpose. , Walter Schindler and ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... By all indications, and due to months ... officials call for diligence, asking homeowners to scout for any open water sources that ... with the annoying buzz of mosquitos is the buzz associated with potential infections stemming ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... MedTech ... in the modern ART laboratory, to provide hands-on training utilizing cutting-edge equipment at ... NextGen LifeLabs, a MedTech Group Purchasing vendor , will provide specialized equipment ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... New patients from Charleston, SC, are ... dentist practicing in Mt. Pleasant, SC, with or without a referral. A full mouth ... with missing teeth in Charleston, SC. Those who suffer from gum disease, ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... May 23, 2017 , ... New ... gums and chronic bad breath, can now receive laser gum disease treatments from the ... Douglas Campbell and David Landau are raising awareness of the importance of receiving qualified ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/9/2017)...  Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ORMP ... focused on the development of oral drug delivery ... Office has granted Oramed a patent titled, "Methods ... patent covers Oramed,s invention of an oral glucagon-like ... incretin hormone that stimulates the secretion of insulin ...
(Date:5/6/2017)... IRVING, Texas , May 5, 2017   Provista ... 1994 with more than 200,000 customers, today announced Jim ... brings a wealth of executive and business experience to Provista, ... a compounding pharmacy in California . He ... "Jim is a great fit for Provista," says ...
(Date:5/4/2017)... , May 4, 2017  A recent study ... Ultraviolet-C light as a means of ... ability to reduce bioburden on anesthesia workstations. In ... on high-touch, complex medical equipment surfaces contaminated with ... "This study further validates the body ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: